Is Albo the Manchurian Candidate?

Albo is clearing the decks on China:

“Whoever’s in government, it will be a difficult relationship,” Albanese said. “It will be difficult because the posture of China has changed. It is China that has changed, not Australia that has changed.”

“I don’t … blame the government and never have for the current circumstances,” Albanese added.

…Albanese said a Labor government would deal with China “in a mature way. Not by being provocative for the sake of it to make a domestic political point.”

“I don’t argue that a change of government will simply change the relationship. Because that’s just something that we have to deal with,” Albanese said.

That sure sounds like blaming the Morrison Government to me. As he has done repeatedly:

“I remember Prime Minister [Kevin] Rudd giving a speech in China, in Mandarin, of course, which was critical of human rights issues, but done so in a way that also was designed to make clear our values but not designed to offend for offence sake,” he said.

“And what we were able to do, and the Howard government was able to do as well, is have relationships that built that economic interaction that was very important for us.

“This government seems to have presided over a complete breakdown of relationships.”

That statement followed China issuing its 14 conditions for the end of Australian democracy. If ever there was a moment in history for an opposition leader to join the government it was that one. Albo squibbed it horribly, illustrating both poor judgement and pro-China bias.

Even recently, Albo’s shadow foreign affairs minister, Penny Wong, was still busy blaming the Government for the state of affairs between the two nations.

Neither has Albo been particularly visible or stern on Labor’s many China corruption scandals.

Then there are Labor’s greybeards, embedded like ticks in the former architecture of the relationship. They have amply demonstrated their inability to adapt to a “changing China.”

Finally, China has recognised the failure of coercive economic campaign and is now making overtures:

China’s new ambassador to Australia, Xiao Qian, has extended an olive branch months out from the federal election and described his ambassadorship as a “noble mission”.

After arriving in Sydney on Australia Day, Mr Xiao said the China-Australia relationship was at a “critical juncture facing many difficulties and challenges as well as enormous opportunities and potentials”.

Mr Xiao, who follows the firebrand Cheng Jingye as China’s 15th ambassador to Australia, said he would work closely with government officials and business leaders to “jointly push the China-Australia relations back to the right track”.

“I see my ambassadorship as a noble mission and, more importantly, a great responsibility,” Mr Xiao said.

“I look forward to working with the Australian government and friends in all sectors to increase engagement and communication, enhance mutual understanding and trust, eliminate misunderstanding and suspicion, promote mutually beneficial exchanges and co-operation in all areas between the two sides.”

Ignoble is more like it. There is no engagement with the CCP without its expanding tentacles of corruption.

This is a dangerous moment for Australia.  The last thing we need to do is backtrack on a policy setting of active Chinese disengagement, only postponing it for a more precipitous and severe adjustment later.

I don’t believe Albo regarding China. Nor has Labor earned Australia’s trust on the issue. Given it is most likely going to win in a historic landslide, Australians will have to watch him like a hawk.

Houses and Holes

Comments

  1. Arthur Schopenhauer

    Nor has Labor earned Australia’s trust on the issue.

    Please remind us who sold the Port of Darwin, facilitated the takeover of the Australian food processing industry and destroyed advanced manufacturing. (Hint: not Labor.)

  2. It’s difficult to conceive of a situation where Labor moves closer to the CCP without the US spy state having a bit to say to Labor on this to reorient them.

    Methinks this is Labor throwing some crumbs where needed to make themselves electable. I think this is overworrying things.

    At present, unfounded fears on this are less an issue than very real issues like ICAC, climate and job casualisation etc.

    PS: what Arthur S said.

    • Hopefully ICAC can address the CCP subterfuge of both LibLab that has been/is going on (Dastyari Robb etc)

    • At present, unfounded fears on this are less an issue than very real issues like ICAC, climate and job casualisation etc.

      Doesn’t matter.

      The accepted narrative is that the hypothetical bad things a (nominally) left-wing Government might do, are always a bigger threat than the real bad things a right-wing Government is actually doing.

  3. ErmingtonPlumbingMEMBER

    “Given it is most likely going to win in a historic landslide, Australians will have to watch him (Albo) like a hawk”

    Concerned Australians can wield more oversight and censure over the ALP and Albo from within than Sooking from the out side.

    You know what you must do if you love our country,
    🇦🇺

    https://www.alp.org.au/about/join-labor/

    • A mail order Carcano Model 38 is a better way to fix the governance, and greater show of love, for our country.

      • ErmingtonPlumbingMEMBER

        That’s the rifle George Orwell used when fighting for the Anarcho syndicalists in the Spanish civil war,…I think.
        Or might have been the one that shot him in the throat.
        I can’t remember.
        Homage to Catalonia ‘twas a good read.
        Let’s hope the same shenanigans described in that text don’t occur here

        • I think there’s a more famous use of the rifle….

          Let’s hope the same shenanigans described in that text don’t occur here

          It shouldn’t, but let’s hope it does require the radical shift in politics to be what resolves the woke problem.

  4. TailorTrashMEMBER

    said the China-Australia relationship was at a “critical juncture facing many difficulties and challenges as well as enormous opportunities and potentials”.

    Those enormous opportunities and potentials will be just like they are in Cambodia and Laos …..a tad one sided with a nice little earner for the traitorous elites …….

      • So why do you think 1000 voices will be listened to when 100 aren’t?
        It’s just the same in the libs as well, see other article.

  5. That’s why we must vote in large numbers for independents & minor parties! Both the LNP & Labor primary vote is only in the 30’s so it’s doable, but only if preferences don’t flow to the majors.
    For example Flux will not preference anyone!

  6. « China » might corrupt our government? Have you seen what the current government has got up to?

    Even assuming both sides were corrupt, basic competence would help. At this point I don’t care about ideology any more – I’d vote for an inanimate carbon rod over the current lot; at least it would not actively make things worse through bumbling, lying and general ineptitude.

  7. “I remember Prime Minister [Kevin] Rudd giving a speech in China, in Mandarin, of course, which was critical of human rights issues, but done so in a way that also was designed to make clear our values but not designed to offend for offence sake,”

    lol, one should simile and be polite when discussing human rights abuses, but attending at an awards dinner (for which this time around you are not being honoured) with the full intention of creating “offence for offence sake” is to be applauded.

    sure, ok

    • lol, one should simile and be polite when discussing human rights abuses, but attending at an awards dinner (for which this time around you are not being honoured) with the full intention of creating “offence for offence sake” is to be applauded.

      Well, are you taking into account the privilege associated with this expression?

    • Just checking – you think Grace Tame not being a good little girl and smiling with a PM who clearly has not taken the issue she won the award for seriously, is causing offence for offence sake? Do I have that right?

      • No one asked her to be ‘a good little girl’, most of the criticism could care less about respect for scummo! That narrative is just a bit of faux sexist gaslighting that plays well in the press.

        It’s a pretty basic argument of ‘there a time and place’ and all the media drama that suggests some other deep and meaningful message behind it and the subsequent criticism is just BS. As if simply having an opinion that the behaviour was in poor taste and has subsequently diverted attention from those whom the event was celebrating immediately renders you some sympathiser for the patriarchy.

        My comment was simply pointing out that it is (apparently) well accepted that in certain situations and events there is level of decorum that is expected and cognitive dissonance that applies when the same people demand that this decorum be applied to dealing with dictators and human rights abuses but not during a non partisan, celebratory public event.

        • “There is a time and a place” is the antithesis of pretty much every effective protest movement in modern history.

          I thought Tame’s reaction was a bit petty (why turn up, act the petulant child and then stay shtum on why you did it?) but it certainly wasn’t inappropriate.

        • That decorum is to “stand next to the person, shake hands and take a picture” which Grace Tame did. She did all of that.
          What you are asking for is her FEELING good about it and conveying those feelings on her face or body language. Sorry noone gets to demand that from another person. Her feelings are her choice, not scummos right.

          And noone did the same with justice Hayne when he refused to engage in the same way with frydenturd at their press conference for Banking RC. He turned up, handed over the findings folder, shook hands but absolutely refused to smile or show warmth. Noone called him out. Everyone cheered that on as a correct response in the situation. Noone had a go at the person who swatted away scummos hand during bushfires and refuse to shake scummos hand for paying no respect to the issue they were facing saying “oh but it is rude not to shake hands when a camera is pointing at you”.
          This is the benefit of a democracy, if someone is an a$$hole that doesn’t respect the very thing that you stand for, like a fixing the banking industry or holding a hose or standing up against [email protected], then you may have to at most take a photo with them, but you don’t have to extend any warmth to them. It is your choice and here’s what it looks like when a woman doesn’t want to play nice with a man in power that is a rape culture propagating a$$hole.
          I can’t believe she managed to get through it without spitting in his face.

  8. but done so in a way that also was designed to make clear our values but not designed to offend for offence sake,” he said.

    There is no place for Chinese-Han (yellow?) supremacy. They need to be made aware of, and adapt to, our cultural differences because offence is only ever taken, not given.

    Which leads to….

    Finally, China has recognised the failure of coercive economic campaign

    There’s a bloke in the history books called Neville Chamberlain who is used as the example of why you don’t try to appease evil.

    We have the ALP trying to ally us with said evil.

    Xiao Qian is not saying sorry to the institute of the Australian government, just the incumbent party.

    After arriving in Sydney on Australia Day, Mr Xiao said the China-Australia relationship was at a “critical juncture facing many difficulties and challenges as well as enormous opportunities and potentials”.

    Recent times have shown the opportunities China gives to Australia to be mostly fungible. We’d be wise to make that a valuable lesson.

    The only (latent) opportunity China offers is a market size in one hit, so we’re limiting ourselves to taking the easy option.

    Mining hollowing out all other Australian industry, and the punishment of all younger generations to aid the baby boomers by way of a property bubble says we need to stop with easy options.

  9. Despite all the rhetoric, who else will buy Australia’s dirt? Where are all our white goods made? Right now, where does our RAT kits come from? So Albo is 100% correct is saying ScoMo is being provocative toward China for the political purpose, while his policies only makes Australia even more dependent on China.

    Albo needs to start by bringing back local manufacturing. Otherwise Australians will be buying 10 year old second-handed fridges for $2k on gumtree when relationship with China hits the rocks.

    • Yes, he’s certainly tried to win votes with some of his actions, they should have been done more diplomatically & professionally, but Albo is right it’s Xi’s CCP that has changed & started the rot in our relationship.

      We certainly need to bring back manufacturing, even if it was the US who was doing it all, manufacturing is essential for a modern prosperous, complex economy, equality & a national security issue, whether defence, energy, medical etc

    • Despite all the rhetoric, who else will buy Australia’s dirt? Where are all our white goods made?

      Anyone who needs it. It is the most generic of commodities and its sale is contigent on the total global demand for it, not anyone who has a fetish for a green boxing kangaroo logo.

      White goods are made wherever it is cheap to do so, if you’re following global trends, its moving out of China.

      It wouldn’t take much in terms of currency to have Fisher&Paykel to increase capacity once again.

      If X-billion tonnes of Iron ore are required to fulfil global demand, Australia is going to occupy much of the total because our iron ore is cheap to extract, and no other reason. There’s a small logistics drag, and unless global manufacturing moves en masse to the east coast of Canada, we will be fine.

      Right now, where does our RAT kits come from? So Albo is 100% correct is saying ScoMo is being provocative toward China for the political purpose, while his policies only makes Australia even more dependent on China.

      I remember a party which professed itself to be for the benefit of workers, so much so they were the ones historically insistent on tariffs.

      Imagine if you will, there was a 2 year window of supply chain shocks, limited human travel and you lived through the realised risk of (lack of) economic self sufficiency… to align with today’s date we’ll call this hypothetical situation COVID-2022.

      I for one would look to prioritise the onshore manufacturing of medical consumables, thinking this would be the worst thing to have happen to regards to economic dependency, in a nation like Australia.

      Imagine such a benign, yet populist, policy coming from ‘the party of the workers’. How far above their most basic of core tenets would you think thety’d have to be, to come up with this one?

      If they’re not thinking this, would I be out of place to think they don’t “have their finger on the pulse” in terms of being a workers party?

      Albo needs to start by bringing back local manufacturing. Otherwise Australians will be buying 10 year old second-handed fridges for $2k on gumtree when relationship with China hits the rocks.

      So you’re saying the way a workers party gets a handle on this “pulse” is when there is a 2-3 year drag on the life-cycle of products and the population is screaming at them?

      Wow, it a policy response involves being hysterical and screaming at the ALP… no wonder they are woke,

  10. The new CCP ambassador might act nicer but her will still be trying to achieve the 14 demands for a ethnic genocide dictatorship intent on destroying ALL opposition in order to prevent any sort of alternative narrative from gaining traction. The CCP have shown this countless times both internally & through international organisations. To engage with them on the quite is exactly what they want, and will allow the naive graybeards who obviously don’t actually understand Chinese culture (I’ve seen more street arguments in China than the rest of the world combined, hows that for loss of face or subservient women!), the only successful way is the Aussie way, speak your mind. If they loose face for thier own poor judgment, too bad, they have failed to understand Aussie culture, it’s a two way thing, the possibility of them “loosing face” will apply pressure to the CCP to make better decisions.

  11. Mr Morrison has no chance of loosing the next election which will definitely have strong khaki tinge. Chinese dripping with wickedness will be scurrying about everywhere and only Mr Morrison will be there to save us all. There’s going to be wall to wall press coverage just like last time.
    If the best the ALP can do is refer to Mr Rudd’s notorious “zhengyou” speech then there’s no hope for them.

  12. Q: If the CCP runs a direct or indirect campaign that criticizes a particular Australian political party or their actions during this election cycle, do we collectively loose our minds over foreign election interference or is one side the the spectrum happy to let it slide? No big deal, nothing to see here, sounds like an alt-right conspiracy theory..?

    I’m genuinely interested in views here. Mine is that the beneficiary will happily call out and feign outrage at the CCPs actions, while immediately shifting the narrative to ‘yeah, but the truth in the arguments is……’ before dismissing any impact said campaign would have on results.

    • It’s all about teams, look at the 2016 US election.

      Hysteria based on what over what is now proven to be an actual conspiracy with ” muh Russia”… when the Australian government (via do0wner) and ABC media interfered more than Russia actually did ($600 of facebook ads)

      It can, and will be overlooked based on the team(s) involved.

    • Yes, the side gets any support will be happy.
      Gov could get ahead & ban CCP controlled apps since scomo has no right of reply