Australian Dollar

Australian Dollar Analysis, News and Forecasts

The Australian dollar, Aussie dollar (AUD) is one the world’s great commodity currencies. Founded in 1966 and floated in 1983 the Aussie “battler” is the 5th most traded currency in the world despite the economy being only the 12th largest by GDP.

The Australian dollar spent much of its first two decades post-float consistently devaluing from the pre-float value of $1.48 US dollars in 1974 to a low of 47 cent in 2001.

Subsequently it broke this huge downtrend with the rise of the Chinese economy and it’s insatiable demand for raw materials – especially those inputs into steel production, iron ore and coking coal – which Australian was endowed with in abundance. It topped this enormous turnaround in 2011 at $1.11 versus the US dollar.

As the super cycle entered decline so too did the Aussie, falling to a low of 68 cents in 2016 and still falling.

However, the Australian dollar  had became popular as a small reserve currency holding with foreign central banks. As the value of the currency virtually halved during the bust they kept buying. Because global central banks were fighting both low inflation and oversupply worldwide, many engaged in an overt currency war, deliberately devaluing their currencies to capture or protect global market share of production. This was exacerbated by private sector flows pursuing the “chase for yield”.

This proved a challenge to Australian macroeconomic managers as the commodity bust persisted. Without the lower value, the Australian economy was unable to compete in non-resource sectors. The Reserve Bank of Australia embarked on a series of interest rate cuts, jawboning and, eventually macropudential policy, to bring the Australian dollar to fair value.

There are five drivers to the currency. Australia’s relative position vis-a-vis Chinese and its own growth; interest rate differentials, the strength or otherwise of the US dollar; the terms of trade and sentiment. Each of these tips into any fair value model but over time the primary driver is the terms of trade. The relative strength of each waxes and wanes with wider trends. For instance, during the “tech bubble” of the late nineties the Australian dollar was battered lower by poor sentiment as it was seen as a pre-tech dinosaur. After the “tech bust”, the currency rapidly recovered as sentiment turned favourable for real assets like commodities.

MacroBusiness covers all apposite data and wider analysis of these issues daily.

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Macro Afternoon

Stock markets are once again oblivious to real world macro settings as the Dictator-in-Chief sends the USD plummeting against major currencies at a similar rate of decline of the US standing in the world. The RBA maintained its historically low interest rates, not going negative as many economists are pushing locally, while Bitcoin breached the

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Macro Morning

By Chris Becker  Stock markets continue to diverge from economic reality with Wall Street lifting higher despite rising civil unrest and growing tensions with China over Hong Kong and other trade disputes. The latest ISM manufacturing survey had some glimmer of hope within but still showed extremely weak conditions across the US as unemployment ravages

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Macro Afternoon

A modest start to the week as Chinese equity markets react to the wet lettuce rhetoric from Trump on China’s boot on Hong Kong’s neck as most capital cities in the US burn, which should send housewares/DIY/retail stocks up when Wall Street opens later tonight. The USD is falling sharply, particularly against the Aussie dollar,

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Australian dollar hits 0.67

A new post-COVID high for the AUD this morning: Bonds are stable: XJO is soft with S&P futures: Big Iron is up and away: Big Gas is struggling to believe: As is Big Gold: Big Banks are undoing the surge: A Big Chunt struggles: Westpac’s fair value model has lifted a little but remains well

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Macro Morning

By Chris Becker  Action on markets on Friday night was centered around the US reaction to the Chinese boot on the neck on Hong Kong, with Trump unable to enact anything but hot air in response which calmed stocks on Wall Street somewhat even though the headline Dow fell slightly. The weekend race riots across

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Macro Afternoon

A flat end to the week as the window dressing month end meme takes place across risk assets with most stock markets pulling back here in Asia. Besides the usual end of month reshuffle, risk is still waiting Trump’s policy announcement on China, but it seems he’s too busy having a dummy spit about Twitter

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Macro Morning

By Chris Becker  The risk edifice continues to push higher, helped along by a reduction in continuing jobless claims in the US even though all the other economic markers show the world’s biggest economy in a deepening recession. Wall Street stumbled at the finish due to some Trump remarks with US Treasury yields rising slightly,

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Macro Afternoon

A busy day in Asia with lots of economic reports confirming the impact the coronavirus is having on world economies, with the RBA all but ruling out negative interest rates as the local appetite for capital expenditure falls sharply. Despite the economic reality, the unrelated share market rally’s continue across the region, save for embattled

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Macro Afternoon

A mixed mood in Asia despite the orgy of buying still going on in the northern hemisphere with only Japanese stocks advancing on the whiff of more stimulus measures. Meanwhile the Chinese Yuan hit a new low versus USD again, with offshore trading pushing through the 7.17 handle as other majors kept firm against USD

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Macro Morning

By Chris Becker  The return of Wall Street sent risk sentiment higher overnight as stock markets continued their push to return back to normal overinflated bubble like status before the COVID-19 pandemic. The USD took a big hit against the majors with Pound Sterling back to a two week high and the Australian dollar pushing

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Macro Afternoon

A solid up day here in Asia despite the lack of a lead from US and UK markets with a sea of green across stock markets. The USD is weakening against all the majors, save Yen, with gold still asleep on the sidelines. In mainland China, the Shanghai Composite closed 1% higher to 2846 points,

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Macro Morning

By Chris Becker  Even a closed Wall Street couldn’t keep the bulls away overnight with European markets surging as the prospect of more economies opening up post-COVID19 overshadowed any concerns over the Chinese/US tensions. Currency and bonds were relatively stable, although gold lost further ground while industrial commodities lifted with oil prices hitting another new

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Macro Afternoon

Despite the rising tensions with China and the West over Hong Kong and the and a long weekend for US markets, risk is going all in again in Asia, starting the week with a flourish outside of the Middle Kingdom. In mainland China, the Shanghai Composite is off a handful of points, still hovering above

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Macro Morning

By Chris Becker  The Trading Week ended with a whimper on Friday night on Wall Street as tensions over the US/China relationship continued to simmer over as the rhetoric ramped up going into the CCP’s national congress. Meanwhile, the long weekend caused many traders to pare their positions with US stocks ending mixed, and Treasuries

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Macro Afternoon

It looks like the risk complex has had enough of buying, with all stock markets coming up against resistance and unable to push through, the catalyst today being the Chinese revision in official GDP growth targets, coupled with the clear death of freedom in Hong Kong. The USD continues to firm against all the majors

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Macro Morning

By Chris Becker  Risk sentiment just can’t seem to get above the current elevated levels on stock markets around the world and are snaring back to reality everytime a macro issue raises its head. US stocks fell back nearly 1% overnight on US/China tensions and the rising coronavirus case load, with the USD reasserting itself

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Macro Afternoon

Stocks are slipping again, coming up against significant buying resistance as other risk assets like oil are still flying ahead as caution spreads across Asia. Gold also fell back as the USD strengthened against all the major currencies, with the Aussie also back to its prebreakout high. In mainland China, the Shanghai Composite is selling

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Macro Morning

By Chris Becker  Risk markets re-engaged the buy levers again with the release of the latest FOMC minutes providing a catalyst for further advances, Wall Street lifting nearly 2% while other risk assets like the Australian dollar and oil rose in kind with industrial metals mixed. Treasury yields fell back to historic lows again while