Labor demands Australia surrender to China

China continues its assault on Australia today:

And this:

WeChat have censored Scott Morrison’s post to the Chinese public, on the grounds it “involves use of content that incites, misleads, has non objective facts” or “fabricates societal/historical issues”, as the stoush between China and Australia continues apace.

On Wednesday night, people were blocked from viewing the Prime Minister’s post, and were instead met with a message which said “Unable to view this content because it violates regulations” in English before continuing in Mandarin.

“Involves the use of inciting, misleading, or contrary to objective facts, text, pictures, videos, etc.,” the WeChat warning said. “Fabricate social hot spots, distort historical events, and confuse the public.”

Obviously, it is high time we banned WeChat. It is a Beijing edited mode of media control for the Chinese diaspora.

Joe Biden declared he would not lower Chinese tariffs until a full review and his incoming defense secretary tweeted support along with the US ambassador:


But it is at home where Chinese pressure is bearing rich fruit. After hawks have won the propaganda war for a few weeks, today’s media suggest that far from it being over, many cowards and cringers have been lurking in the shadows waiting for their chance to sell the country out. Today they come forth, encouraged by Anthony Albanese, leader of the Labor opposition:

“I remember Prime Minister [Kevin] Rudd giving a speech in China, in Mandarin, of course, which was critical of human rights issues, but done so in a way that also was designed to make clear our values but not designed to offend for offence sake,” he said.

“And what we were able to do, and the Howard government was able to do as well, is have relationships that built that economic interaction that was very important for us.

“This government seems to have presided over a complete breakdown of relationships.”

Did any of them face a rapacious Xi Jinping? No. Was it the same world? No.  To underline the point, which of China’s 14 conditions of Australian surrender does Albo endorse for peaceful co-existence?

I guess, all of them, given that is the only way that China will “pick up the phone.”

But wait, there’s more. So much more Labor treason. The Labor state premiers are unbelievable. From Manchurian Dan:

He said that image was “just beyond the pale”.

“It’s wrong. I condemn it,” he said. “I would hope the rhetoric, the commentary, social media posts, comes to an end.”

…“This relationship is far too important to farmers, to manufacturers, to workers, to profits for Victorian companies and therefore prosperity for our state,” Mr Andrews said.

“This is not just our biggest customer, but it is all about jobs. We need a good relationship but it has to be a fair and respectful one.”

Mark McGowan:

“I just want us to continue to have good, friendly relationships with our long-term trading partners.

“They buy an enormous amount of our products, we buy a much smaller amount of their products.

“It’s been a beneficial relationship for both countries and I think we need to make sure we have cool heads and work things out by discussion and not confrontation.”

Anastasia Palaszczuk:

“What the mining companies are saying to me is the last thing they want to see are mines closed in Queensland,” Ms Palaszczuk said.

“That could have an impact on Queensland jobs.

“It’s not just Queensland — it’s Western Australia … private companies are saying to us, as heads of government, that they are concerned for local jobs — and we are seeing that across now a whole different variety of sectors, so it is a national issue.

“We have National Cabinet next week, so I’m quite sure it will be raised at National Cabinet.”

Presumably, they all endorse China’s 14 conditions of Australian surrender as well.

Treasurer Josh Frydenberg made the apposite point:

The Treasurer on Thursday said Mr Albanese should say whether he was ready to muzzle free speech or water down foreign interference laws in response to China’s demands.

“If the Labor Party wants to play politics with this, it’s only fair they explain which of the 14 grievances that China has listed that they would back down on?” Mr Frydenberg told ABC News.

“When it comes to a free press, that goes to the heart of our identity and our society. When it comes to a democratically elected Parliament and the ability of MPs to speak their mind, that’s also at the heart of our democracy.

“When it comes to foreign investment and putting in place of protections for the national interest, I’m sure they have bipartisan support and other elements of national security and foreign interference.

“What we have done is try to defend and preserve and enhance the national interest as you’d expect us to do.”

Exactly. Which essential pillars of a free society is Labor prepared to sell to Beijing? China has made it plain that we must meet them all for good relations so by Labor demanding action to repair the relationship is ipso facto agreeing with all 14.

At the end of the day, it doesn’t really matter anyway. If you give in on one then you give on all. China will simply threaten trade again whenever it needs a Labor errand.

Frydenberg also warned that decoupling will cost the recovery which is true enough. But how much? Jason Murphy provides a terrific chart at Crikey:

Can Australia break its dependence on trade with China? There are precedents. Not all of them are hopeful.

Australia has had a single dominant trading partner before. We were locked into the UK economy first and then, much later, to Japan.

As the chart shows, China’s outsized relevance to our national wealth is not without precedent. Japan had a similarly big role in the 1970s and before that the UK was even more dominant.

There you have it. We’ve done it before without all of today’s hysterics. Arguably it will be easier as well. Chinese demand isn’t diminishing like Japanese did. It is shifting to other suppliers which means they will leave holes in other markets that we can fill. It’s entirely manageable. So what if it costs us a few dollars and jobs for a few years.

All of my worst fears have come true. Australian Labor is now the effective functioning arm of the Chinese Communist Party in Australia.

It must NEVER see power.

Houses and Holes
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Comments

  1. What a strange year 2020 has been. Bushfires, coronavirus, and now I find myself agreeing with Josh Frydenberg.

    • yes, all those jokes about him being bukake princess werre in poor taste! we need to rally around Josh, c’mon guys!

      • That’s the unsettling feeling of ALP abandonment. As they unburden themselves of labour principles to ride off further into the sunset on their service economy and China fantasy, Frydenberg, Creepy Pete and Scotty from Marketing are the only ones standing, holding out a turd sandwich for the Australian public – hoping that people will get hungrier.

        This is how it ends, not with a bang but a whimper.

    • Sadly, modern Australia is not that different to China.
      The lawyer who exposed the war crimes is still facing 60 years in jail. The other SAS member who exposed the crimes was assassinated in Perth in 2018.

    • Never thought I’d hear myself wholeheartedly agreeing with Frydenberg but here we are. ALP need to grow some balls and stand up to the CCP (and actually stand for something) or be forever the party of opposition.

      Which let’s face it, they have been for 25 years now. I’m now 41 and John Howard came to power when I was in Grade 11 and aside from six mostly turbulent years the ALP have sat on the opposition benches despite competing against utterly woeful governments led by Abbott, Turnbull and Morrison.

      • Hopefully the good Lord has passed the hand of God to ScoMo now that Maradonna is done with it😉

      • Its 2020.
        Of course the Chinese have us saying “How good is ScoMo?”
        Anyone would think they are trying to drive his approval rating above 80%.
        The 14 item surrender list, the slap in the face doctored image that socially offends all of us, mocks us when Twitter doesn’t censor the offending image and then underlines the point by censoring him on WeChat.
        All of that pulls us behind the PM. Poor Albo must be wondering what black cat walked across his path.
        Speaking of cats, it seems that Pooh strokes a white cat.

  2. Where’s Totes?

    I’ve gone from probably voting Labor in the next Fed election, to most likely voting independent (not PHON, thx)…because of this issue. Nice one, Labor.

    What is wrong with you?

    • Ditto. Already vote for independents where there is a good option but Labour is now going under the Libs in preferences.
      You would have thought at the very least they should look at what the majority of Australian’s think about Xi’s China and go with the wind accordingly. Dumb dumb dumb. Writing to my MP.

      • Don’t write to Labor. Let it dawn on them election night.

        Meanwhile take the $2.80 lay bet Labor.

        • Already did. They may be too dumb to figure it out for themselves so have to help them out. Otherwise their pundits may tell them it was because they aren’t woke enough and didn’t have enough female/minority representation that they lost…
          Told my MP that there are a number of reasons why I would vote for Lab over Lib but if they continue with this she will lose my vote.

      • You see, it’s not the ALP’s problem, but the Sinophobic bigots and racists who don’t like the ALP social engineering plan. The ideologically possessed ALP ostrich is not for turning, even if it has buried its head on the railway track. The likes of Terri Butler, Katy Gallagher, Shaoquett Moselmane, Dan Andrews etc etc are deeply ideologically invested in a ‘progressive’ model of social reform where Sino-centricism was a virtue that allowed you to prove your anti-racism, tolerance, acceptance, global and economic credentials. It was a one-stop holy cow that allowed the renovation of labour principles. Hence, a ‘study tour’ in China was a right of passage where a vision of the Hawke-Keating Brave New World could be glimpsed. It was in effect compulsory for ALP politicians to visit the China economic Godhead and get the CCP to reciprocate to hug a koala.

        The removal of the Chinese made sheep’s clothing has been a body blow to the ALP more than the LNP. This was their entire economic strategy and jewel in the progressive crown that they crowed about endlessly. Without it they are knackered.

    • The only question left in my mind is if I put Labor after Liberal on the ballot, only just ahead of any religiously aligned party. I will number every damn box if I have to to ensure anyone and everyone gets my vote before this sad lot!

    • Ive been a Labor Voter my whole adult life as is everyone in my family, i will not be voting for them either, cant beleive im gonna preference them lower than Libs, also cant believe im aggreeing with JF.

    • I shall write to my local MP Gladys Liu and thank her for the wonderful work her party is doing in pushing back against the CCP. 🙂

    • I will never give an established party a first preference vote ever again.
      And as for that beachtowel senate paper I vote below the line for the 16 candidates as specified and not one of these candidates will be from an established party either.

    • Unfortunately in our fooked up electoral system, even if you put LibLab/LabLib last, like I always do, the one who you put second last always gets your vote.

    • Under a preferential voting system you cannot not vote for Labor. The question is whether you will preference them ahead of the liberals.

    • Why were you going to vote for them before all of this? What policies did they have that warranted your vote?

    • The only chance anyone has of impacting the political system with their vote in the Fed election is the senate, if you vote independent/minor party for lower house you’re more than likely voting for the LNP. In the senate race these smaller parties have a better chance of getting up and having an impact.

      A hostile and diverse senate can hold either side of the two party system at bay and potentially force change. But as we’ve seen too many times these parties horse trade for worthless crumbs.

      Sure, vote independent, but don’t expect to see anything changing though. Sure LNP are conveniently not China friendly right now, but they’ve also trashed this country and sucked the China teet as much as anyone…

  3. Labor knows the electorate don’t want this. Its obvious there’s far more at stake.

    If this continues, China will release names and detail of who they own in Australia’s Parliament.

    I couldn’t be happier about the way this is unfolding.

  4. For a democratic society we need an opposition. Labor must change their approach and not look for political point scoring on this.

    • Labor seem to be “opposing” the liberal position on this. It’s really the first significant point of differentiation for a long time so I’m not really sure what you mean.

  5. Will be putting Labor last at the next state and federal elections due to this issue.

    Is anyone looking at CCP connections with unions?

    Edit: there should be a trade penalty for any country gov which goes “leader for life”.

    • IMO we’re better off with Labor as state governments, despite that idiot in Vic. State LNP are just too ruthless. As long as Morrison stops the belt and road along with asset sales, State Labors better IMO.

      • yeah valid point with state LNP.
        Hopefully there’s an independent or someone else better than the Liberal candidate.

        • Great. Me too. It’d be great to come up with a way to harness all the votes for independents and minor parties and direct them away from Labor, Greens and LNP.

          It can be done, it just has to be coordinated.

          • lols.
            How did the great independent saviour Ms Hanson work out?
            The reality is she is clearly a better operator than the majority of “independents” up for election given her longevity in politics.
            Let THAT sink in for a while.

          • bjw678

            My hatred for Labor is multi layered. Only some of the layers are for what’s good for Australia.

            Many of the layers are about justice. The sitting MPs must lose their seats.

          • bjw678

            No, that’d be incorrect.

            The future i seek is independents across Australia with a tiny handful of unshakeable, non negotiable CORE POLICIES.

            They’d only provide LNP with supply on condition of the core policies being met.

            Simple stuff. No holes. It absolutely can be achieved. Hopefully before it’s too late.

            Here’s the thing. They’ll meet the criteria or not next term, or they’re out.

            You protest too much.

            BJW? Any Labor staffers or MPs with those initials?

            Mmmbop.

          • You really are an ID 10 T totes. Labor is a group of people with a few CORE policies. you just don’t like them.
            What you are describing is a political party. A group of independents is a rabble at best.
            Who do you think will enter politics in your world where you have to give up your career to enter for a term or 2 if you are lucky.
            You won’t even get the calibre of people the liblab duopoly currently attracts, and that’s a very low bar.

          • “You really are an ID 10 T totes”

            I don’t respond well to that. What I’m saying is so obvious, so logical, so 2plus2=4, so solid you can’t argue against it, yet I’m being called that?

            “Labor is a group of people with a few CORE policies. you just don’t like them”

            No. Labor are a household brand name we’re used to voting for. They are a generational vote grabber. Their policies are no longer in the interests of Australia. Labor are a party and collectively decide what policies they like and are in their interests, not ours.

            Labor have a few minor policies that attract the plebs vote but are so overwhelmed by their other policies it’s ridiculous.

            They MUST be replaced to save Australia and most people know that.

          • “Who do you think will enter politics in your world where you have to give up your career to enter for a term or 2 if you are lucky”

            Have you ever voted? There’s always high numbers of people wanting to become politicians/Independents.

          • What the absolute [email protected]#k do you think a group of independents will do if they actually manage to act together?
            ” collectively decide what policies they like and are in their interests, not ours.”
            No one is going to the trouble of getting elected to not act in their own interests. I’ll ask again, when are you running as an independent, and if not why not?

          • “Have you ever voted? There’s always high numbers of people wanting to become politicians/Independents.”
            But very few who have the intelligence, resources or drive to get anywhere near actually doing it. It simply costs too much in time and money to actually do successfully for altruistic reasons. This is why our parliament is full of the people it is.

          • “No one is going to the trouble of getting elected to not act in their own interests”

            Of course they will. Have you ever met a human? BTW, there’s enough self interest in just being a politician.

            “I’ll ask again, when are you running as an independent, and if not why not?”

            I’ve told you a few times. Only an idiot would be a politician. I have no reason other than saving my country, and frankly doesn’t deserve the effort I already make. I’ve already got a career.

            “But very few who have the intelligence”.

            None of them do.

            “resources or drive to get anywhere near actually doing it. It simply costs too much in time and money to actually do successfully for altruistic reasons. This is why our parliament is full of the people it is”

            I’ve already told you I believe there’s plenty of people willing to do it. And I’ve already told you my idea of the ones we select sharing preferences. Give me the courtesy of listening to what i say huh?

            I know you love the Labor party. I don’t.

          • So you think a bunch of people you know are idiots are going to do what you want in parliament.
            Do you think that sounds like a logical argument?

          • bjw678

            It’s infinitely better than the status quo, and it’s infinitely better than all the other ideas I’ve heard.

            It ticks every box.

            It’s doable, and that’s what has you ssssooo rattled.

  6. Let’s have all dual Australian/Chinese citizens relinquish the one they value the least.

    We cannot accept there are disloyal Australians among us.

  7. Believe me when I tell you, I’ll vote LNP if I have to in order to destroy Labor. That’s how serious it is and I am. (sorry Ermo)

    • With respect, this should have occurred to you llllooonnngg ago.

      But why vote LNP? Vote for independents STRATEGICALLY and in a coordinated way to control LNP.

      • We need to help people, and indepedents, find ways to organise against the majors. I thought a catchy title for a website/organisation would be “Don’t vote laberal”.

  8. I’ve got a euphoric vibe going on, similar to Charlie.

    Labor are finished even earlier than i thought.

  9. rob barrattMEMBER

    Interesting reading some of the above. ” I voted Labor all my life as did my dad & granddad etc etc.”
    The canaries down the mine era ended years ago. Since the 70s there has been not one iota of difference between the 2 major parties. If you look at the stats for senior polies convicted for fraud etc you will get the point. If anything, the stats show the LNP crimos have been rather better at covering their tracks…
    Once again, there is NO difference between them. All politicians’ words semantically reduce to zero. They’re in it for themselves. Period.
    Vote strategically – every time. Don’t give an F for who your dad voted for.

  10. Shades of MessinaMEMBER

    I remember Rudd getting on his soapbox to lecture the Chinese in Mandarin – the blowback was instantaneous.

    It certainly taught the Labour Party to keep their mouths shut on anything to do with China.

    • Exactly. It’s all been fun and games for the last few months as Twitter has censored Trump tweets they disagree with. Heck, the last four years the mainstream media conducted a concerted smear campaign on Trump with baseless allegations and taking soundbites completely out of context.

      • Imagine a candidate that won around half the votes facing such concerto of a smear campaign from the mpst powerful groups in the US.
        If they went after Biden, we’d be discusing if someone remembers whodafck Biden was?!?!

    • That’s not influence, it’s an oppressed minority ’empowering’ itself against all the Australian racism that the ABC reports on as endless anecdotes gleaned from conversations with idiots on public transport.

      Australians must self-censor, whilst the CCP engages in a private conversation with its diaspora and censors those who don’t understand that information ghettos and thuggery are the belt and road way.

      Dan Andrews is totally cool with it apparently.

  11. Ethics aside, all the apologies have presumed that a positive end to this remains a possibility.

    But reason doesn’t work with insecure and unreasonable people.

  12. TailorTrashMEMBER

    Guess China has answered the question raised in the second point of the terms of surrender

    Why would Australia be wary of China owned communications companies ? Surely we chat owned
    by tencent ( a privately held ?? company ) would never take instructions from the China government and censure the Australian prime minister

    Never never ..trust us ….really ..

  13. Totes has now become the sensible centre. WTF! I am a long term Labor supporter. They have lost my vote.

  14. If enough people are prepared to help out, it is possible for the minor parties to claw an increased amount of the vote. I handed out flyers at the Groom by-election (a very conservative federal seat) for Sustainable Australia and got 13% of the vote at my polling station last weekend. Other stations without volunteers from Sustainable got around 5 to 6.5% of the vote. Having help and support makes a big difference.

    • Wow. That is impressive. Good on you.

      Can you tell me about the day, and anything leading up that might have contributed? Posters? Engaging in discussion? A uniform? Just you or more?

      • Pre-polling is a big thing now- I didn’t do any of the days leading up to election day but a significant number of people voted before. On election day most people voted early; if you do the morning session (8am to midday) you are getting the majority of the votes for that station. It wasn’t a big deal. Not one voter asked who Sustainable Australia were, they simply used the QR code on the flyer to see what Sustainable stood for… I was by myself for most of the time (my 15 year-old daughter started off with me but got too hot), but it was fine, the other volunteers from the other parties were friendly and it ended being a morning talking about Australia’s challenges with another volunteer. I picked up a t-shirt, flyers, and a cap beforehand and was asked to read the volunteer guidelines on the Sustainable page. It was seriously easy, all the voters were polite and friendly, and it was no big imposition. I would do it again. You just need to smile and say good morning to everyone and hand them a flyer. That’s it.

        • Thanks for that. I might try and meet one of them and see if they can help me with this independents idea along with sharing preferences with them.

          Either way, I’m definitely getting involved the coming election.

          • @winning

            I’ve achieved a whole heap in my life. My idea is evolving, I want to get it right, and I’m not at all interested in putting my name or face to anything. Whatever I end up doing politically will be considered and devastatingly effective.

            I have nothing to prove, my motive is Australia’s future, and I shouldn’t have to defend BS comments from someone with as little depth in anything such as yourself.

            I am a life long proven achiever; you are the opposite.

        • bolstroodMEMBER

          Anthony Greene reckons having people manning the polling stations , handing out how to votes adds 3-4% to that party’s vote.
          So your effort was a very good result.
          Congratulations

      • I don’t know, but that opinion is easy to come to given we don’t collectively vote for his party (which was called Sustainable Population Party).

        I’m certain population is important to him, given he’s a scientist, and started the party.

  15. Australia should have never got rid of its tarrifs and never allowed anywhere near the mass migration we have had in recent years. The liberal party is all hype on this issue though, they had previously never seen a free trade agreement they didn’t love. They will also continue to be free trade zealots after the bluster on China wears off. They are just trying to score a few points against the ALP in the meantime. In fact I would not be surprised if the LNP capitulate in the future, if the Chinese blockade starts to significantly affect their donors.
    All that being said, China is right (albeit hypocritically) when it comes to Australia’s human right standards. There is not a war that America can’t order Australian soldiers into at a moments notice. Australia should not have gone to Afghanistan, or Iraq, or Syria, or Vietnam, or any other place in the last 60 years or so. None of the countries are better off for having the pleasure of there people being murdered in their own lands by our soldiers. Also Australia is not free by a long shot, just look at our pathetic politicians acquiescence to the jailing of Assange.

    • You are the reason the Labor party are what they are, ergo what LNP are doing to us.

      We have no choice but to do what America tell us to do militarily. Get that through your head and with this going on, thank God we did.

      Grow up leftist. The world isn’t perfect.

      • Not sure he is a leftist.
        Tariffs- tick
        Mass migration- tick
        LNP on FTA- tick
        LNP may capitulate if sponsors say so -(students?)- tick
        Australian soldiers in US wars- tick.
        Gutless on Assange- tick

        These are not L-R issues. Accurate observations in the most part.

        • I just saw the references to doing what America wanted us to do militarily and cracked it. I can’t handle it.

          It’s just reality of the modern world, and that anyone would side with Labor over this, i just see red.

          There’s many reasons Labor are in opposition and this is one of them. Australia doesn’t trust them when it comes to America and China.

          • “Murdered” is OTT. Then again, not too many prisoners taken by either side on the Kokoda track.

          • Lol there’s that impulse control issue again. You say you’re a “tested genius” and yet you couldn’t even read a whole post before, by your own admission, “seeing red” and posting a retort that was based on an incorrect assumption. Is that how a genius mind works?

          • @winning

            Did you read it?

            “Australia should not have gone to Afghanistan, or Iraq, or Syria, or Vietnam, or any other place in the last 60 years or so”

            You crack me up. You so want to catch me out. So desperate. “Paging forklift aisle 5, aisle 5”

  16. Australian Labor is now the effective functioning arm of the Chinese Communist Party in Australia.

    I’m just glad to see that the Labor party has some function, it certainly isn’t interested in the Politics of representing Australian worker interests, so it’s good to see that it has found its calling
    Now that we know Labor’s true function, let vote accordingly and forever rid ourselves of these Political hypocrites

    • It’s a mistake to the think the ALP are functioning at anything. They may be the Australian branch of the CCP, but they’re not even doing a very good job of that.

      • Can someone explain and educate me why Labor – in the modern era – are so keen to befriend and be lo loyal to Chynnna?

        It makes no farrrken sense. BONKERS. Seems a deliberate moronic position to take. Go figure? Clive?

        • If you ask me the sole reason is that the CCP hasn’t completely lost its own ideological roots and therefore has a natural tendency to support Labour movements in other countries. Our Labor party is not blind to this potential money tree and is shaking down it for all it is worth.
          Labor is corrupt, from A to Z they’re corrupt bunch of ba5tards, if they can sneak their fingers into anyone’s pants pockets then they’ll have a go at it.
          Corrupt ba5trads one and all.!

  17. All of my worst fears have come true. Australian Labor is now the effective functioning arm of the Chinese Communist Party in Australia.”

    Your position is extreme. It’s far more likely that Labor is simply doing what all oppositions have done for some time – throw mud and disagree. That has been the template for some time on both sides of politics. Yes it is piss weak but, it’s also hardly surprising given that’s been a well-established political norm for success in the past. Assuming political opportunism and the wrong doings of a few to be indicative of all is a bridge too far.

    The reality is both sides are responsible for this situation. China’s reversion to historical norms is no surprise. It has happened before in history. They both permitted our indigenous manufacturing capacity to go overseas, hollowed out our economy and allowed our dependence on China to grow to the extent it has. They both also assumed that making a totalitarian regime an economic and technological powerhouse while simultaneously weakening the hegemonic power of the US wasn’t going to have consequences. The problems in Russia should have signalled their naivety but, like every government we have had for at least a generation, they embraced the free trade doctrine without question and justified it with the flimsiest of assumptions.

    “We’ve done it before without all of today’s hysterics. Arguably it will be easier as well. Chinese demand isn’t diminishing like Japanese did. It is shifting to other suppliers which means they will leave holes in other markets that we can fill.”

    Yes we have done it before but, you’re not providing a complete picture. With the UK it took many generations. With Japan we had our own indigenous manufacturing as part of a more balanced economy that took decades to cultivate behind tariff barriers. Unlike China, Japan actually invested money in developing our own manufacturing as those tariff barriers incentivised that investment. Today our economy is dominated by powerful interests that have done well in the near borderless world of trade that has been cultivated by successive governments. To change that now with our hollowed out economy, means a lot of pain both economically and politically for anyone that wants to change things. I think Scott Morrison knows this is the case.
    He certainly deserves our support as he fights this battle but, lets be clear eyed about what’s ahead. A lot of traditional domestic allies may turn on him if things get ugly and China starts taking aim at key industries like mining. The risks for ScoMo are huge as this will demand a rapid change to our trade/ economy on a completely different timescale to the one you have presented above. You seem to think there is little chance of that because they are dependent on our ore and they will suffer job losses. I disagree.
    They are a totalitarian regime which has complete control of the information their people receive and much of the economy. Unlike ScoMo, there are no powerful interests that can temper Xi to the same extent. You seem to think there is but, Xi has demonstrated time and again he will take a firm and brutal line with anyone that challenges central rule. Anyone that wants to challenge him risks swift and severe retribution. Any domestic economic fallout will quickly be blamed on Australia el al and there will be little opportunity for anyone to say otherwise.
    They have probably already worked out ScoMo’s position is weak in relative terms, so they will play hard knowing they have the upper hand. The power bubble Xi lives in is also most likely full of sycophants propping up this view, so don’t assume rationality will win the day. I believe we should support ScoMo regardless but, we need to be upfront about these challenges if we’re going to last the distance. When that happens, we might even be able to question the merits of certain “sacred cows” like the recent free trade agreement signed.

    • Good post, and let’s hear lots more discussion about FTAs from all sources. The public don’t seem to have picked up on this.

    • “Labor is simply doing what all oppositions have done for some time”

      BS. If that’s the case you’d have to agree they’ve comprehensively misread the room. You don’t seriously believe that do you?

      • +1.What’s wrong with saying we support the Prime Minister on this issue. The 14 demands are absurd and could not be tolerated in a free society. They might be fine for a totalitarian state such as China.

      • bolstroodMEMBER

        To paraphrase your commment.
        Them’s weasel words. LAbor is fully endorsing Chinese appeasement which is stark raving mad.
        If on the other hand we go flat out confrontation we will come to
        THE END.
        There is the middle ground , .

          • bolstroodMEMBER

            Don’t get me wrong Fitz, this is deadly serious.
            Those 14 points are the least of it.
            A Chinese navy battle group invited itself into Sydney Harbour a few years back,
            their crew lining the decks were all armed with automatic weapons.
            That was in response to our navy’s first freedom of navigation exercises thru the South China Sea.
            Our leaders didn’t seem to know where they came from.
            We must assume a considerable 5th. column.
            We are totally unprepared for any untoward eventaulities.
            That there have been no major wars in the last 70 years has been acase of good luck and international trade.

      • Weasel words! Sorry you feel that way David. Perhaps I can make it clearer for you. I certainly don’t think Australia should capitulate on the 14 demands but, resolving this wont be easy and least of all for ScoMo who has in part built a political brand on standing up to China. So as much as it is great to see him standing up to a bully, the “do more and talk less” philosophy when it comes to mixing it with a big power might actually have more merit than you are prepared to admit. We also need to learn from these events on every level.
        I also find the label of treason being thrown about with little to no evidence worrying. I’m aware of what the intelligence agencies have said in government briefings David, I just think we are better than that.

  18. Wechat censoring a comment is no different to Twitter censoring a comment from Trump that they disagree with.

    People can’t have it both ways here.

    • Most of the Trump tweets are fact checked under the tweet. Wechat didn’t “fact check” (i.e provide the official govt line) of the specific parts of Scomo’s tweet and chose to ban the tweet instead. So there is a large difference.

      • Those “fact checks” can’t be relied on. Any claim by Trump about voter fraud has been labelled a “baseless allegation” and censored on Twitter. No there is voter fraud proven. There are massive statistical anomalies.

        When the Hunter Biden leaks happened social media and MSM went to great lengths to bury the story. It was effectively censored.

        • Hate to say it, but the people who work for the “MSM” are professionals. They are trained to verify, check sources, confirm facts – not just spray BS all over the place. That’s why the Hunter Biden stuff wasn’t reported on much. Because it was false. It was unverifiable BS with no way of checking it.

          Your “massive statistical anomalies” are in the same category here. The claims are BS, as anyone with any knowledge of statistics and how the voting progressed and was counted could explain to you if they could be bothered.

          • Yes they are professionals with PHDs in fact checking…

            There’s no bias at all and hold both sides of politics to the same level of scrutiny…

          • “They are trained to verify, check sources, confirm facts – not just spray BS all over the place. ”
            hahahahahahahahahahahahahahahaha.
            So why are you here again?

          • “Hate to say it, but the people who work for the “MSM” are professionals. They are trained to verify, check sources, confirm facts – not just spray BS all over the place.”

            LOL, I literally wet myself laughing at this.
            Solid gold!
            I will take if for my compilation of pearls from comentariat.

        • Yeah sure…nothing that can change the result… as attested to by 2 GOP governors. Just can’t get over the fact that Trump lost despite the fact that your fearless leader promised “so much winning you will be tired of winning”.

    • Twitter doesn’t censor, it just provides a disclaimer questioning the veracity of the tweet.
      There’s nothing stopping a person from viewing what was posted.

      • why would they need to check anyone on anything on this 100% opinion perdling platform?
        In news media, opinion pieces are labelled as such (e.g. OpEd etc) and that implies “caveat lector”

    • “People can’t have it both ways here”

      Yes they can.
      It is called bigotry and dual standards.
      Well oiled machine by now.

  19. This photo from the BBC shows why things opened up in the 2002-11 period… the person facing the camera directly is Wen Jaibao. He worked for Zhao Ziyang, the Premier at the time of Tiananmen Square. He was a liberal and a reformer. Now, we have a Maoist. Everything Xi does is inspired by Mao.

    The game has changed and our Quislings and useful idiots just don’t want to see that…

    https://www.google.co.nz/amp/s/www.bbc.com/news/amp/world-asia-china-50097221

  20. Australia probably needs to know when to keep its gob shut.

    Our troops committed horrific war crimes in Afghanistan for laughs basically and now we have our knickers in a twist about a cartoon specifically designed to bait us.

    We’ve got troops drinking out of a trophy prosthetic limb for crying out loud.

    Go back a few years and the SAS deeply insulted our nearest neighbour by mocking the principles of which Indonesia is founded upon.

    Now we’re busy riling up the West Papuans after getting involved where we shouldn’t have with East Timor. There will come a day where Indonesia has a better military and substantially bigger economy than us and we won’t be dictating terms to them.

    Abbott is 2014 was talking about “shirt fronting” Putin.

    We talk a big game for a country with practically no defence of our own.

    • IMO and not excusing either, what China does in Tibet, Xinjiang and Inner Mongolia pales in comparison to what some members of our SF did overseas.

      That being said, I 100% agree. Australian exceptionalism is the biggest cultural cringe and the only thing positive about all this chest beating from China is, it’s exposing that we talk a massive game but can’t really back it up either. Hopefully it red pills some of our folks but I’ll remain cynical.

    • Absolutely we should have gone into East Timor. We saved thousands of peoples lives as a result, with the undoubted help from the US.

      The CCP caused the death of 45 million in China
      https://www.independent.co.uk/arts-entertainment/books/news/maos-great-leap-forward-killed-45-million-in-four-years-2081630.html

      The SAS members will at least get a trial. Perhaps we shroud wait for that before condemning anyone. I am still waiting for anyone to be charged for killing the students at Tiananmen Square.

      • Shades of MessinaMEMBER

        Probably would have been better if we also then didn’t steal their gas deposits.

        Unless of course that was the end game all along….

        • People are alive today who otherwise would be dead. The Australian Justice System and Bernard Collaery will sort out the tappers. Try doing that in China.

    • “Australia probably needs to know when to keep its gob shut.”

      You like keeping people quiet there bloke?

      The people of each country should be free to say what they want.

      And you disagree because……?

  21. Ah yes, the old MB sleight of hand.
    True, Labour are currently useless.
    But The Libs have been in power for 18 of the past 24 years. 18. Labour was in charge over the GFC.

    So surely a party who’s been in power for 75% of the time since the mid 90s is more than somewhat responsible for the predicament this country finds itself in now?

    • IMO this is often a copout argument from Labor voters. Real question is why have Labor been so unelectable for 18 of 24 years? They support identical economic policies to the LNP. You have to be beyond awful to be worse than the LNP and that’s what they are.

      Labor could win in a landslide by scrapping FTA’s, slashing migration and going protectionist but they won’t because they’re captured by the same neolib corporates with a few token nods to different social issues. When you’re going to an unloseable election with a policy of unlimited parental visas for elderly migrants you deserve to be annihilated.

        • It’s not due to immigration policy though.
          Their primary vote has been spiraling down ever since the Keating disaster epoch.

          What does my head in is people who supported Keating, still defend Keating and then claim that Labor has lost support due to recent immigration policy.
          Look at any data on Labor electoral support over the past 40 years. They lost support when Keating embraced neoliberalism.

          • I fully agree with you Keating was the start of the end.

            That link is not just about immigration, and includes such things as “Australia’s globalising transition and its impact on voters.”.

            Well worth a very good look. Take the time to read it.

          • ErmingtonPlumbingMEMBER

            Along with his Tariff busting, increased Mass immigration was a predictable outcome of Keating’s neoliberal embrace.

          • They lost support when Keating embraced neoliberalism.

            Keating is a vain puppet who embraces elitist dogma. If rich elites went off elephant shooting for sport, then Keating who be all for elephant shooting for sport. Ditto any other disgusting elite fad.

            It just so happened that elites were pushing neoliberalism at the time that vile opportunist seized power from the dopey old crybaby.

            The only thing I can say in Keating’s defence is that he can’t really be blamed for neoliberalism in Australia. It was a worldwide phenomenon driven by globalist elites. If Keating hadn’t been there at the time, some other empty-headed egotist would have brought it in – just like Thatcher and Reagan did to their countries.

          • ErmingtonPlumbingMEMBER

            John Howard as treasurer wanted to take us there in the 70s
            Malcolm Fraser, who thought Howard a Grub, wouldn’t let him.

        • Still seems to me that a lot of Lib supporters and MB are engaging in the act of misdirection.

          18 out of 24 years with your guys in charge. The country is stuffed. Labour are useless in opposition but maybe just maybe they’d be better in power.

          In effect you are all arguing that a hypothetical situation (Labour winning the election) would be far worse than the sh#*show REALITY we are living in now- THIS reality with the LNP having held power for so long.

          • LNP are not “my guys”. I spend all day attacking every policy they have other than China.

            I also consistently note that Labor has a superior economic policy platform.

            But if it is going to give in to China then that is a no-brainer fuck off on behalf of my kids.

          • ALP and LNP have the same socio-economic goals. The only difference being LNP is doing the speed limit, Labor is going twice as fast – the destination is the same. Engaging in team red/blue partisanship is nonsense when one is diahrrea, the other is solid faecal matter.

            It’s rusted on Labor voters who still won’t accept the real party died in the 1990’s when it hitched it’s wagon to globalist deregulation and “Asianisation” which has led to the current mess on a number of fronts. Instead, they continually blame the voters and other noise (but but SFM, Murdoch, etc) instead of taking a look at themselves. They scrubbed any mention of the elderly parent visa policy from the internal review they had at the last election – couldn’t even face it. Pathetic.

          • “It’s rusted on Labor voters who still won’t accept the real party died in the 1990’s”

            Died in the 80s. 1983-84 to be exact when an ambitious Treasurer formed the Martin Committee of Review to endorse the recommendations of the Cambell Report lock stock and barrel.

            Also Murdoch is not noise and it’s no accident that that problem originates with the same man who deliberately made him the “prince of print” in 1987 screwing up the media ever since.

          • Back to school for you.

            Totes has been banging on for years how an ineffectual Labor Party are allowing a rampant LIberal Party. A team can only play as well as its opposition allows. How can you not understand this? FM. Muppet central.

        • Don’t forget that for the few years that Labor were in power they were so busy knifing each other in the back that they had little time for any well thought out policy.
          When one faction (of Labor) or the other actually tried to get worthwhile policy through Parliament, it degenerated into an internal sh!t fight.
          Everything was about “the Numbers” every policy, every thought, every challenge, everything… and as we all now know the numbers were all determined by branch stacking.
          Labor is no longer a political party with a worker focused Ideology . Labor no longer even tries to pretend, so why does the electorate.

          • And even with all that knifing and carry on Gillard’s minority govt was the most successful govt in this country’s history at the actual business of “governance”. I’m not a big fan of Gillard but getting that much legislation passed with a minority govt is pretty impressive considering how farcical our politics has become.

      • Why is the dole so low and why won’t it change? The lack of ALP govt and why the LNP keep winning are tied up in that question.

        ALP and LNP policies are very similar but not exactly. Most voters in this country are short sighted and selfish. That’s really it for me, that’s all you need to know.

    • Much of what was good about the country was wrecked by Keating.
      Since then governments from either side have just administered the country rather than changing it.

      • What put each party off attempting change though? Was the LNP put off after the rodent got destroyed because of work choices? What stopped ALP? Genuine questions, it’s only just now I’ve realised what you’re saying.

        • Everything had already been done, except the consumption tax.
          Howard pretty much admitted that.
          Keating undid everything and created a new orthodoxy or what journalism calls “consensus”
          In order:
          Deregulated finance, deregulated the product market, deregulated the media, deregulated the pension system, removed public ownership, removed active fiscal policy (“inoculating all future Treasurers”), deregulated higher education, started inflation targeting, deregulated the labour market, abandoned and demonised the welfare state as a “welfare bag of policies” in favour of market liberalism.

          I mean that’s it; that’s really all a federal government in this country can do apart from Health which he couldn’t touch because Hawke aways campaigned and won elections on Medicare.

          he removed the old regime and created the new one, and governments post have simply be working within the new regime and politicians have become more and more unpopular because people confuse a well justified dislike of the new regime (which doesn’t work) for a dislike of politicians administering it.

    • The LNP are in power more because of how sh!t the opposition is and was. If you read MB enough, they hammer the LNP and are not currently suggesting the LNP are good… more that they are less sh!t than Labor and currently a lot less sh!t.

  22. I think Labor is largely unelectable in Australia because they don’t actually represent Labor anymore. They represent civil servants and fringe groups with a hard-left ‘social wars’ agenda. Not only have they lost touch with ‘middle-Australia’ they actually have contempt for them, and for the values of the middle class…

    • Anything which fractures and disorients the working class is not a “hard left” agenda.
      it isn’t even a political agenda imo.

      • Hard left, like hard right, is anti democratic and totalitarian in nature.

        Far from being too ‘left wing’, the ALP have embraced neoliberalism and ‘free trade’ to such an extent that they’re no different to the LNP.

        • disagree.
          Anarchism and Syndicalism were considered to the left of Communism (Marxist-Leninist) and they were anti authority anti state tendencies.
          This stuff has all been completely muddled by the likes of Peterson, Twitter etc.

          • ErmingtonPlumbingMEMBER

            Some of that is true enough Sweeper.
            The problem is when all these “well meaning” “left leaning” ideologues are happy to have their policies implemented against the Democratic will of the people.
            Regardless of whatever altruistic intent, this “right to rule mentality”, this right to control, is the very essence of what it is to be “Right wing” and conservative.
            A true left isn’t lead by a great leader,..it informs and leads tself. Democratically.
            That’s not just anarchism it’s Marx as well.

            The idea that the Totalitarian USSR was Left Socialist is one of the greatest Propaganda deceptions in all of history.
            Interesting how the spin doctors of the “Left” and right perpetuate these myths for their own nefarious reasons.
            One of my favourite Chomsky clips speaks to this perfectly,
            https://youtu.be/yQsceZ9skQI

          • they aren’t left leaning though.
            They are perfectly happy with oppression by economic means carried out at scale and not just in terms of wealth but in terms of control. That is incompatible with leftism.
            It’s just a veneer which was adopted by social democratic parties when they lost popular support and had to compete for the “middle” on a-political issues. Keating mastered it in the early 90s.

          • That may be so, but established extremes like communism and fascism have very similar features.

            I wouldn’t say today’s ALP are anything but centre right on economic policy and their immigration stance is just one feature of this along with their China kowtowing.

            They’re a ‘free trade’ and ‘open border’ supporting party just like the LNP, but go to such extremes that even the trickle down Tories can wedge them on national security and sovereignty.

            Keating’s embrace of neoliberalism effectively killed Labor federally and made Howard’s job of reconstructing Australia’s economy into a hollowed out, Thatcherite, service based shell a lot easier.

    • ErmingtonPlumbingMEMBER

      Well Peter,
      the solution seems simple to me.
      All the Working and middle class patriots here at Macrobusiness.com.au and elsewhere across our great country need to join THEIR ALP and overthrow this compromised ALP leadership from within.
      Its the only chance we have of reinstalling Working class representation and Democracy to Australia.
      “Independents” who do not have to answer to a demanding rand empowered rank and file within their own parties will be just as easily beguiled and purchased by money and power as any of the current crop in parliament.
      aA Real Democracy requires constant participation and Work.
      https://www.alp.org.au/about/join-labor/

    • I think Labor is largely unelectable in Australia because they don’t actually represent Labor anymore. They represent civil servants and fringe groups with a hard-left ‘social wars’ agenda.

      No, Labor represent the Unions. That is, after all, their purpose

      Note that there’s a difference between “the Unions” and “the workers”. In particular, only about 15% of “the workers” are still in Unions.

      “Hard-left ‘social wars’ agenda” doesn’t even make sense, but Labor’s contemporary social policies aren’t particularly radical.

      Not only have they lost touch with ‘middle-Australia’ they actually have contempt for them, and for the values of the middle class…

      Uh huh. Like what ?

      • Agree mostly. However in your view do you think the country would be better or worse off if Labor returned to being a party focused solely on economic justice as it was really before Whitlam and left the social agenda to community groups and minor parties?
        Not that they would disagree with progressive social views, just tactically leave that campaign to others?

        • I don’t think I agree with your premise. I believe the same underlying ideals and motivations drive the struggles for social and economic just1ce. The fight for one will inevitably produce the fight for the other (which is not to guarantee either will be successful).

          Despite contemporary soci4l just1ce issues being _relatively_ minor either in scope or demographic (as opposed to, say, older ones like emancipation, male and then female suffrage, abolishing child labour, etc), they’re still significant to the people they impact – and in a two-party system must be supported by one major party or the other to be legislated. The same sex marriage debacle is an obvious example of why your suggestion wouldn’t produce good outcomes.

          As I said initially, to me, working for soci4l just1ce is a natural and obvious progression out of working for economic just1ce (and vice versa). I am always a bit mystified when I run into people who insist only one of them matters.

          *Conceptually*, I would argue economic just1ce is actually a subset of soci4l just1ce, though practically speaking I think the former is pre-requisite to the latter.

          TL;DR: I don’t think your idea _could_ work (soc1al just1ce issues would inevitably be introduced into party policy), more importantly I don’t think it would produce good outcomes for the country because it would prevent soc1al just1ce issues from being addressed in a timely fashion (eg: what we saw with same-sex marriage) and finally I don’t think there’s any real justifiable reason to create a separation.

          • It is the difference between a leftist and a liberal imo.
            a leftist doesn’t believe you can achieve liberty without removing or limiting underlying oppression.
            a liberal thinks you can have oppression by economic means and still have widespread liberty. I think that is delusional.

            “believe the same underlying ideals and motivations drive the struggles for social and economic just1ce”

            struggle for economic justice definitely creates space for social justice issues.
            Does it work the other way around? Doesn’t appear to or offer the same threat to the status quo.
            eg. it is very easy to work social justice into the marketing budget of a large corporate, it’s a lot harder to work in increasing the minimum wage, re-unionising the workforce, enforcing company tax etc. into the same budget.

            “they’re still significant to the people they impact – and in a two-party system must be supported by one major party or the other to be legislated”

            legislating is one thing. A heap of things which get almost no coverage are legislated on. Why does it have to be campaigned on as a central message if you are a traditional labourist party is the question. And tactically does it make more sense to leave to minor parties and groups outside parliament?

          • Well put smithy

            Edit: and interesting rebuttal sweep.

            Glad to see it was worth scrolling all the way down to see some thought provoking input instead of the “rabbble rabble China, rabble rabble never vote ALP”.

          • It is the difference between a leftist and a liberal imo.
            a leftist doesn’t believe you can achieve liberty without removing or limiting underlying oppression.
            a liberal thinks you can have oppression by economic means and still have widespread liberty. I think that is delusional.

            Seems reasonable. A leftist is interested in protecting society, a liberal is interested in protecting individuals.

            struggle for economic justice definitely creates space for social justice issues.

            So this is where I make a distinction between conceptual and practical. Practically speaking, you almost certainly need a relatively economically fair society so that people are able to consider soc1al just1ce issues without a “struggle for survival” context.

            Conceptually, I would argue economic just1ce is an aspect of the larger idea of “soc1al just1ce” (others might be religious, gender, racial, etc), but I appreciate this might be perceived as just an issue of nomenclature. My larger point is that conceptually I think they are all inter-related and ultimately peer issues.

            Does it work the other way around? Doesn’t appear to or offer the same threat to the status quo. eg. it is very easy to work social justice into the marketing budget of a large corporate, it’s a lot harder to work in increasing the minimum wage, re-unionising the workforce, enforcing company tax etc. into the same budget.

            Really ? Because the status quo generally pushes back against any attempts at meaningful (as opposed to symbolic) improvements in this space as well. But I take your point – it’s probably easier to pay lip service to s0cial justic3 with less risk of it getting out of control.

            I’d come back to my original point though, pursuing a soc1al just1ce struggle is eventually going to raise issues around [un-]employment, income inequality, opportunity, etc. I’d also argue that pursuing these sorts of issues through unionism is a sub-optimal path – people shouldn’t have strong rights as workers because they’re in a union and the union can strike or otherwise intimidate/threaten employers, they should have strong rights as workers because they’re people living and working in our society.

            legislating is one thing. A heap of things which get almost no coverage are legislated on. Why does it have to be campaigned on as a central message if you are a traditional labourist party is the question. And tactically does it make more sense to leave to minor parties and groups outside parliament?

            Well I guess it depends on whether you want to appeal to traditional labourist voters, or cast the net a little wider. 😉

            Tactically I’d say it does not make sense to leave it to minor parties – these issues tend to be significant to the yoof, they align with the broader goals of the party, there’s arguably little to be lost from formally supporting them, and not supporting them means you’re losing voters to the parties that do.

            The far larger problem here, in my opinion, from a messaging perspective is that a largely conservative-controlled media gets to control the narrative. This has a much bigger impact than what constitutes the primary vs secondary aspects of policy.

  23. https://www.news.com.au/travel/travel-updates/fight-over-pristine-whitsundays-beach-reaches-fever-pitch/news-story/c9afd2dfa76e36e46fc1def63d319101

    Land-based access to sections of the national park have been “locked” or blocked with boulders; keep out signs have been erected along the foreshore.The airstrip is no longer accessible and, worst of all according to locals, one of the island’s most majestic public beaches is off limits.The picturesque playground in the Coral Sea is being controlled by a Chinese developer who has gone to ground after purchasing the 96-year lease for 117 hectares with plans to develop a tourist resort to accommodate 3000 people.
    News.com.au approached Mackay Regional Council which refused to comment. They handballed the issue to the Palaszczuk Government on the grounds that “the long-term lease is between them and China Bloom”.
    A Queensland Government spokesman told news.com.au the developer is being urged to do the right thing.

  24. Labour are going to get the big end of town backing, and everyone will accuse ScoMo of economic mismanagement… you will have everyone from the ABC, BHP and think tanks putting the inevitable upcoming economic malaise on ScoMo shoulders! And much of the proletariat will listen and follow that advise.

    The Elites will sell us out, which is not the surprising bit; it will be how cheaply they will do it for… the price of freedom isn’t what it used to be. I hope I am wrong.

  25. The ALP’s strategy of winning the next federal election based on the regaining of central and northern QLD regional state seats is doomed.
    Regional QLD is overwhelmingly against increasing Chinese influence in Australia, especially the buying of prime agricultural land and other rural assets.

    • “western politicians … do not accept the idea that other races are on an equal footing with them.”

      Western politicians or Chinese worldview?

  26. I need much better men here to add context and substance to the following pub analysis. Just wondering whether we are witnessing a monumentally complex and – up to very recently – subtly implemented strategy fall apart due to sheer cult of personality and nationalism, both gone mad (kind of hand in hand stuff).

    China had been exploiting the catastrophic fallout of the GFC, watched the old establishment gently crumble with Brexit and El Trumpo and just saw great opportunities in the major cracks that followed, progressively took control of UN, WHO and the lot, created vast international networks of scholars reporting valuable knowledge back to China in a one-way scenario (note to Universities Australia: provide tangible proof of reciprocity please), created vast international networks of political influence, made massive investment in infrastructure and foreign aid filling the gaps left by the retreating West for equally valuable returns (particularly a powerful web of military installations) and am sure am missing heaps of other key matters in trade and finance…and then along comes the wolf warrior hyper-nationalistic madness to blow the lid up and reunite an increasingly divided West and Indo-Pacific region against what is now unanimously seen as a common threat (bar ACRI & similar folks of this world)??

    I’d be really interested to know the opinion of the many experts that populate this blog.

  27. Quick Albo get down to the pub in an attempt to appear human, just don’t order the Tsingtao this time.

  28. working class hamMEMBER

    A Scumo led lighthorse charge.
    Whatever happens in the next 12 months, it’s going to be interesting.

    • CCP has a formidable army of “supporters” as they have essentially allowed a select group of its population to get rich by bending the rules. If any of them dare to criticise the party, then the rules no longer remain bendable. Then it’s either a death sentence or life in prison from corruption/ fraud charges. Yes, the CCP are scumbags.

      • Thats exactly right.

        Mao was a bandit who Stalin believed that he could promote and use. Between the two of them, they set up their respective administrations along the lines of organised crime. Essentially, the CCP is a mafia organisation who uses the Chinese Nation as its piggybank and its people as slaves. Now its attempting to export that model and it sees recent US weakness as an opportunity to exert global power. If we give in, we will become strangers in our own home.

  29. LOL, interesting that the harshest and most loud critic of everything-Chi1na is actually peddling the very exact thing that Ch1na is accused of:

    Obviously, it is high time we banned WeChat. It is a Beijing edited mode of media control for the Chinese diaspora

    Next step: Books burning

    D, L and S for President of Australia!

  30. Talk is cheap. I’ll believe Morrison is serious on China when students, property purchases and iron ore exports are banned.

    • Fishing72MEMBER

      I agree. It was only recently that he was holding Gladys Liu’s hand aloft in our parliament and declaring Australia racist for doubting her United Front supplied resume.