Trade deal “stalled because of Hong Kong legislation”

Via AXIOS:

 A week ago, U.S. sources close to the China talks indicated they were on the precipice of a “Phase One” deal. But that optimism now seems premature, if not misplaced.

  • Congress sent legislation to Trump’s desk that angered Beijing, interrupted the trade talks, and telegraphed support for democracy and human rights in Hong Kong. The new Hong Kong Human Rights and Democracy Act requires the president to impose sanctions on people who violate human rights in Hong Kong.
  • Trump begrudgingly signed off, as the legislation passed with veto-proof majorities.
  • Beijing responded with predictable fury and threats, even as Trump took pains to downplay the bill and to flatter President Xi in his signing statement.

Behind the scenes: A source close to Trump’s negotiating team told me the China deal was now “stalled because of Hong Kong legislation” and that time is needed “to allow Xi’s domestic politics to calm.” The “Phase One” deal with China would probably happen “year-end at the earliest,” and Trump is expected to hold off on his planned December tariffs to keep the deal alive.

  • Two other sources close to the China talks said several substantive obstacles remain, including how much of his tariffs Trump will roll back, what mechanisms will enforce the agreement, and how the Chinese will guarantee enormous purchases of U.S. agriculture products that Trump has already said they will make.
  • There are also logistical complications. The Trump team has bandied around possible locations to sign the deal — ideas have included Iowa and Camp David — but has struggled to find a mutually acceptable venue.

The bottom line: Most of my sources close to both trade negotiations — both Democrats and Republicans — say they expect both deals to ultimately come through. But there are plenty of reasons to remain wary about these predictions.

David Llewellyn-Smith

David Llewellyn-Smith is Chief Strategist at the MB Fund and MB Super. David is the founding publisher and editor of MacroBusiness and was the founding publisher and global economy editor of The Diplomat, the Asia Pacific’s leading geo-politics and economics portal.

He is also a former gold trader and economic commentator at The Sydney Morning Herald, The Age, the ABC and Business Spectator. He is the co-author of The Great Crash of 2008 with Ross Garnaut and was the editor of the second Garnaut Climate Change Review.

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