Irrelevant UN warns ACT on marijuana legalisation

The ACT government passed laws in September that legalise the use, possession and growing of small amounts of cannabis. The federal government has indicated that it may use its powers to have the ACT’s legislation struck out, with the new laws being at odds with Commonwealth legislation, while the United Nations’ (UN) International Narcotics Control Board has warned the legislation may contravene a number of international con­ventions to which Australia is a signatory to:

The International Narcotics Control Board has written to the federal government asking for clarification over the laws, citing concerns they contravened at least three international con­ventions to which Australia was a signatory…

It suggested the ACT government’s laws passed last month ­appeared in legal breach of the 1961 convention on narcotics drugs, which was amended under a 1972 protocol, the 1971 convention on psychotropic substances and the 1988 UN convention against illicit traffic in narcotic drug and psychotropic substances. “The board has noted with concern recent reports regarding the legalisation of cannabis possession, use and cultivation in small amounts in the Australian Capital Territory, effective 31 January, 2020,” the letter read…

“The board wishes to recall that cultivation, production and distribution of cannabis for non-medical purposes is inconsistent with the provisions of the 1961 convention as amended, in particular article 4(c), which requires state parties to limit the use of narcotic drugs exclusively to medical and scientific purposes.

“The board wishes to reiterate that the legalisation and regulation of cannabis for non-­medical use, including in small quantities, would be inconsistent with Australia’s international legal obligations.”

Earth to UN: Canada has already legalised the use and sale of recreational marijuana, as have eleven states across the United States (where the UN is headquartered).

US Democratic Presidential candidate, Bernie Sanders, has also pledged to legalise marijuana nationally during his first 100 days in office, whereas Germany’s Government is also mulling legalisation.

The UN are ‘unrepresentative swill’ of wealthy bureaucrats. They have no jurisdiction over state and territory laws, and can take a hike.

Unconventional Economist

Leith van Onselen is Chief Economist at the MB Fund and MB Super. Leith has previously worked at the Australian Treasury, Victorian Treasury and Goldman Sachs.

Comments

  1. Fishing72MEMBER

    Give it a few years and watch the Australian people become subjugated by these unelected bureaucrats.

    • As long as house prices stay up and interest rates stay low, nobody will feel subjugated.

      In fact, they’ll be writing thankful letters to the powers that be.

  2. lol
    instead of legalizing cannabis (or any other chemical/plant/fungi/ …) via special laws one can do it just by erasing it from drug registers

  3. Stewie GriffinMEMBER

    The UN are ‘unrepresentative swill’ of wealthy bureaucrats. They have no jurisdiction over state and territory laws, and can take a hike.

    The UN is so much more than that – the sooner Western Nations wake up to the fact that the UN is leading them their progressive nose rings to their doom, the better.

    The fastest and easiest way to take over the world, is to take over the body that was set up to prevent anyone taking over the world.