Links 10 September 2019

Global Macro / Markets / Investing:

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Comments

    • Stewie GriffinMEMBER

      Wokesters only see the world in Black and White and the ‘Professor’ is among the worst of them.

      Your comment and argument was entirely reasonable, but you failed to prostrate yourself before the morally virtuous by sufficiently condemning our history and the people who founded our nation…. unless they are completely condemned and stripped of all credit for carving our nation out of the dust, then it becomes harder to disposes those born to the nation they built and support the cultural genocide taking place today.

    • Blaming the people is a bit rich when most democracies are more akin to electoral dictatorships, with little to no possibility for the people to exercise democracy outside of regular and infrequent elections.

      Democracy isn’t devouring itself, it’s being destroyed by people explicitly undermining and disassembling it, exploiting the areas where it is weakest due to non-democratic structures.

      • Exactly, and I think they naturally want to move to more of a communism system with even more power over the people. Just look at the US with Rep/Dem openly supporting and owning big tech surveillance with truth gone out the window and even to question them is terror or far (something). We’re probably just as bad here IMO.

        • The world is heading towards something akin to feudalism (optimistically) or fascism (pessimistically).

          “Communism” isn’t anywhere to be seen outside of Fox News bogeymen.

          • I’ll go for the optimistic, but it does look like we’ll get something different and probably Orwellian if you look at what happening to the surveillance economy and mostly govs don’t really push back. I keep my sanity by consuming almost zero MSM.

  1. “Over the past year, there has been a 38.72 per cent rise in the number of people over 65 looking for full-time work, but only an 11.12 per cent jump in those finding it.” WOW. Some nice spin on the reality that low interest rates, the slow dismantling of the age pension and the massive cost of living have completely F**ked the chances of an average fella from living a comfortable and dignified retirement. Get a job you lazy bastard septuagenarian c**t. Such progress we have made.

    • Interesting, thanks for linking.
      Not so sure that I agree with all the conclusions (including the big one that EV’s eventually win out) but it’s certainly worth considering the issues. EV’s don’t have to become ubiquitous to cause massive dislocations within the car component supplier networks. It’s worth bearing in mind that Component gross margin is usually a function of the age (how long ago the function was invented/mainstreamed) and how universal it’s usage is. Newer things like Turbo Chargers have much higher margins than components like nuts and bolts or even car radios. For the component manufacturer this means that many of the high margin components (that keep them in business) may not be used on EV’s and that change will often lead to the collapse of the whole component chain associated with that manufacturer. Imagine the dislocation if a company like say Garrett stops making turbo chargers (suddenly all those Turbo Hybrid designs need a little redesigning).

  2. NEW ZEALAND: Is the NZ Government aware of the serious social costs of dense apartment slums ? …

    … Michael Joseph Savage and John A Lee of the 1st Labour government were … and had no intention of bringing the British density failures to New Zealand …

    Build-to-rent apartments must not become slums, property specialists warn …Marta Steeman … Stuff NZ

    https://www.stuff.co.nz/business/115666909/property-specialists-at-massey-university-warn-buildtorent-apartments-must-not-become-slums?cid=app-iPad#comments

    Property specialists at Massey University caution that mass rental housing like apartment blocks need to be well managed and good quality to avoid becoming slums.

    Debate is building on the benefits of “build-to-rent” housing, often large scale apartment blocks overseas, as a way of tackling New Zealand’s housing crisis.

    New Zealand has little mass rental housing like these apartment developments which are viewed as solid and steady investments by large investors overseas. New Zealand developers build apartment developments to sell rather than rent. … read more via hyperlink above …
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    Learning from the British … a documentary classic …essential viewing …

    Inquiry. The Great British Housing Disaster (Adam Curtis, 1984) – YouTube

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Ch5VorymiL4
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    The ‘New Zealand Dream’ is still alive … Wendell Cox … New Geography
    ( noting the important Westpac Bank Dwelling Preference Survey)

    http://www.newgeography.com/content/006327-the-new-zealand-dream-still-alive

    … extract …

    … The New Westpac NZ Housing Preferences Survey …

    … Among the respondents, nearly one-half (49 percent) considered a back yard “essential,” while another 42 percent rated the back yard as “nice to have.” Only nine percent considered a back yard to be “not important.” Among first home buyers, there was an even greater larger 55 percent considered a back yard as “essential.”

    A house with a yard is even more important that one close to work. Only 18 percent of respondents considered proximity to work to be “essential,” well below the 49 percent wanting a backyard. While nine percent of respondents considered a backyard to be “not important,” nearly four times as many said that proximity to work was “not important” (33 percent).

    House location also scored much lower in proximity to schools or child care, which was considered “essential” by 22 percent of respondents and parks/recreational facilities, “essential” to 21 percent. Only 11 percent considered living in social hubs (with “eateries and bars”) to be “essential.”

    Finally, access to mass transit was considered “essential” by only 28 percent of respondents and “not important” to 26 percent. This contrasts with the 65 percent who considered a “lock-up” garage “essential” and only four percent who considered it “not important.”

    These results are not surprising for a high income nation. … read more via hyperlink above …

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