Foodora joins the endless list of migrant wage thieves

Via News:

Bicycle-based food delivery company Foodora faces thousands of dollars in fines after it allegedly put riders and a driver on sham contracts.

The ombudsman has filed an action in the Federal Court alleging the three workers in 2015 and 2016 were presented as independent contractors when they actually did the work of permanent employees.

The two Melbourne riders were aged 19 at the time, while the Sydney driver, an Indian migrant who is now an Australian permanent resident, was aged 30.

Blow me down with a feather. The evidence of migrant wage abuse running rampant nationally is overwhelming. Since the 7-Eleven migrant worker scandal broke in 2015, there has been a regular flow of stories emerging about the systemic abuse of Australia’s various migrant worker programs and visa system. Here is a sordid summary of what has occurred, as documented on this site:

  • The issue culminated in 2016 when the Senate Education and Employment References Committee released a scathing report entitled A National Disgrace: The Exploitation of Temporary Work Visa Holders, which documented systemic abuses of Australia’s temporary visa system for foreign workers.
  • Mid last year, ABC’s 7.30 Report ran a disturbing expose on the modern day slavery occurring across Australia.
  • Meanwhile, Fair Work Ombudsman (FWO), Natalie James, told Fairfax in August last year that people on visas continue to be exploited at an alarming rate, particularly those with limited English-language skills. It was also revealed that foreign workers are involved in more than three-quarters of legal cases initiated by the FWO against unscrupulous employers.
  • Then The ABC reported that Australia’s horticulture industry is at the centre of yet another migrant slave scandal, according to an Australian Parliamentary Inquiry into the issue.
  • The same Parliamentary Inquiry was told by an undercover Malaysian journalist that foreign workers in Victoria were “brainwashed” and trapped in debt to keep them on farms.
  • A recent UNSW Sydney and UTS survey painted the most damning picture of all, reporting that wages theft is endemic among international students, backpackers and other temporary migrants.
  • A few months ago, Fair Work warned that most of Western Sydney had become a virtual special economic zone in which two-thirds of businesses were underpaying workers, with the worst offenders being high-migrant areas.
  • Dr Bob Birrell from the Australian Population Research Institute latest report, based on 2016 Census data, revealed that most recently arrived skilled migrants (i.e. arrived between 2011 and 2016) cannot find professional jobs, with only 24% of skilled migrants from Non-English-Speaking-Countries (who comprise 84% of the total skilled migrant intake) employed as professionals as of 2016, compared with 50% of skilled migrants from Main English-Speaking-Countries and 58% of the same aged Australian-born graduates. These results accord with a recent survey from the Bankwest Curtin Economics Centre, which found that 53% of skilled migrants in Western Australia said they are working in lower skilled jobs than before they arrived, with underemployment also rife.
  • The Australian Bureau of Statistics (ABS) latest Characteristics of Recent Migrants reportrevealed that migrants have generally worse labour market outcomes than the Australian born population, with recent migrants and temporary residents having an unemployment rate of 7.4% versus 5.4% for the Australian born population, and lower labour force participation (69.8%) than the Australian born population (70.2%).
  • ABC Radio recently highlighted the absurdity of Australia’s ‘skilled’ migration program in which skilled migrants have grown increasingly frustrated at not being able to gain work in Australia despite leaving their homelands to fill so-called ‘skills shortages’. As a result, they are now demanding that taxpayers provide government-sponsored internships to help skilled migrants gain local experience, and a chance to work in their chosen field.
  • Then there is new research from the University of Sydney documenting the complete corruption of the temporary visas system, and arguing that Australia running a “de-facto low-skilled immigration policy” (also discussed here at the ABC).

The above bullet points are only a fraction of the various cases of migrant abuse that MB has documented. But you get the picture.

The migrant labour scam is huge. So big, in fact, that it has lowered Australian wages and inflation plus interest rates, driving up house prices and allowing us to over-consume these very same services. It’s become a structural adjustment. There’s no regulating it. It can only be cured with less migrants.

The ACTU needs some good old fashioned labour nationalism, not the wowserish apostasy of Sally McManus. She’s too busy campaigning for Labor to care:

The union movement will intensify its campaign on penalty rates in the next three weeks to highlight an imminent cut to conditions, as it uses the issue to mobilise voters against the Coalition ahead of five federal byelections next month.

ACTU national secretary Sally McManus will take the campaign to the key Tasmanian electorate of Braddon in a bid to put pressure on the government while holding Labor to its pledge to reverse the controversial cuts to penalty rates which are due to take effect from July 1.

The campaign is backed by polling for the peak union body showing that two thirds of voters support arguments for new laws to overturn cuts to penalty rates by the industrial umpire.

Career politician in the making.

Comments

  1. bbagodicsGhost

    lol, can’t believe anyone belongs to the ACTU with a limp, vacuous and mentally invalid clown like ‘ole Sally’ at the helm.
    Doing a great job for XXXX workers in Milton, LOL !

    • You are not seeing the bigger picture. Foodora, Uber, Freelancer. They are attempting to subvert minimum wage laws by turning everyone into an independent contractor. These are test cases to prevent every company attempting the same.

      If riding a bicycle is simple then hire a 16yo to do it.

      • bbagodicsGhost

        I’d love my company to be able to class me as a contractor….trust me – I’d be the one raping them, not the other way round.

      • @bbagodicsGhost,
        so quit, and offer to come back as a contractor then.
        Then you’ll find out what you are really worth.

    • How much do you think someone should be paid to ride a bicycle?

      Well since we have minimum wage laws, I’d say $25 per hour + $1 per km (first 10km in the hr free)

      Enough to raise a family on?
      It would depend. If the rider is required to pay for their fair share of natural resources such as land off elites who have greedily and illegitimately claimed it as their private property, then I would expect the rider to struggle.
      If however the rider is granted a fair share of land, water, etc, then I would expect them to be able to raise a family (and we could also drop the minimum wage laws).

      Do me a favour.
      Sure, what can I do for you?

      • So someone should be paid enough to raise a family on for doing a paper round! Hilarious!

    • DominicMEMBER

      This is the issue. The minimum wage brigade believe that people simply rolling out of bed and turning up at a ‘job’ should qualify them to earn a decent living. All the while they dismiss the link between remuneration and the real value added.

      If someone earning $50k a year is only adding $25k of value in that period, no amount of moral righteousness is going to make the sums add up.

      • Agreed. What they’re doing is making jobs which generate less value than that minimum figure illegal, which hurts young workers starting out in the world of work. Then they complain about youth unemployment. Then about how the robots have taken over. Then everyone needs a unicorn basic income from the government because the robots have taken over.

      • What about when someone has a salary of over $1 million per year? Are they all adding at least $1 million of value?

        https://www.news.com.au/finance/work/australias-highest-paid-ceos-revealed-in-new-2017-report/news-story/cd67998c31533b91568c4e2a2327b2f4

        The minimum wage is not $50k/year. It is $18/hour here and even higher in San Francisco. It is a crude way to improve the lot of the poor. A much better way would be to abolish the minimum wage and put in a UBI – but you are against UBI…so you are stuck with the minimum wage law and unfair dismissal laws. Congratulations.

      • drsmithyMEMBER

        Agreed. What they’re doing is making jobs which generate less value than that minimum figure illegal, which hurts young workers starting out in the world of work.

        No, what they’re doing is setting a baseline value for a full day’s work that society considers acceptable.

        If you can’t generate enough external “value” from that full day’s work to meet said baseline, then maybe you need to reconsider your business model.

      • drsmithyMEMBER

        What about when someone has a salary of over $1 million per year? Are they all adding at least $1 million of value?

        Of course. By definition, if they are being paid $X then they must be adding >$X in value, or they wouldn’t be being paid $X.

      • Jacob, what we have is a situation where private businesses HAVE to be profitable or they disappear (along with all jobs tied to that business). One minor caveat is that very large businesses can carry some deadweight, but only for so long — when the economic winter arrives the deadweight is necessarily ejected. The only employer of consequence that can afford to employ people not pulling their full weight is the public sector — at least in the medium term. In the long term the public sector will fail for this very reason. I don’t know what age you are currently but if you’re under 50 you will likely witness a wholesale restructuring of the strayan public sector in your lifetime — and it won’t be a 10% ‘adjustment’, it’ll be 50%+.

      • @Andrew – you scoff at making a living from riding a bike around, well fair enough. But automation does mean that increasingly a lot of jobs will be out of reach for members of our society. What is your threshold for when someone should be able to live in dignity?

        Certainly digging holes (laborer, mining) , ‘carrying things’ (mover, packer, laborer), ‘stacking things’ (convenience store worker), ‘driving places’ (taxis, uber, truck drivers, train drivers) etc are all “simple” jobs that automation threatens.

        CNC machines will continue to take out machinists and fitters.

        cashless society takes out tellers, grocers etc.

        So what is left? Some programming, design, and maintenance jobs? When there are too many ppl vs number of jobs, those jobs will be so valuable to acquire that they won’t be worth much to have. You can already get programmers out of China and India for $2 a day, and that requires knowing all kinds of things.

        Society must decide for itself what its goals are. It might sound stupid to hire humans to do what machines can more cheaply do. But anyone who has visited Japan and seen how healthy their society is despite decades of ‘recession’ as a result of too many jobs would be pretty stupid not to doubt the alternative. Japan will use 5 guys to guide 1 car to park. It has guides and excess staff everywhere. Jobs that simply haven’t existed in the west for ages. It seems to work for them. If they werent such ‘face’ people they could even cut their hours right down and enjoy things.

        If the job requires the use of adults, an adult ought to be able to live off of the job. That is where Australian society landed. You want cheap hands? Use teenagers. If teenagers aren’t available or are too expensive, you’re not offering anything society really needs.

      • drsmithyMEMBER

        Jacob, what we have is a situation where private businesses HAVE to be profitable or they disappear (along with all jobs tied to that business).

        Nobody disagrees that businesses need to be profitable to survive.

        They disagree that a business which can only be profitable by not paying workers a living wage (ie: essentially by relying on an indirect government subsidy or charity) should be considered economically viable, and morally and ethically permissable.

        (This is one of the bad points of a UBI – it would support and encourage otherwise unviable businesses.)

        If you cannot afford to pay your workers minimum wage, you need to consider how much you’re charging, how much profit you’re taking, and consequently whether or not your business model is fundamentally sustainable.

      • Nobody denies that there are unscrupulous businesses out there that seek to be more profitable than they already are. But I’ll bet you any sum you like that the number of businesses that are motivated by mere survival far outweigh the former. Smithy, your statement, “… you need to consider … whether or not your business model is fundamentally viable” sums things up perfectly. Business owners WANT their businesses to be viable for a number of reasons, including: 1) capital at risk 2) it is their livelihood AND 3) many actually give a damn about the people (staff) who rely on them for their livelihood.

        The Brisbane entrepreneur who started up Eagle Boys Pizza looked to open a bakery chain after that first success but, in the end, he concluded it would never be viable because of weekend penalty rates. How many jobs were never created because this guy couldn’t make the numbers add up? To suggest that greed is central to entrepreneurs wanting to pay a pittance to their workers is wide of the mark.

        The reality is that, via the financialisation of real estate and increased costs of owning property has crushed disposable incomes and is squeezing retailers badly. Dominoes Pizza is wildly popular because it’s so cheap but how much margin do they really have to play with (to pay higher wages)? If all businesses paid higher wages they would have to increase the prices of everything. Will people servicing $500k-$1m mortgages really be that keen to pay higher prices for everything? Will they even have the ability? The general retail sector is basically doomed (along with wages) as the FIRE sector hoovers up an ever greater proportion of people’s income.

      • drsmithyMEMBER

        Business owners WANT their businesses to be viable for a number of reasons, including: 1) capital at risk 2) it is their livelihood AND 3) many actually give a damn about the people (staff) who rely on them for their livelihood.

        Well, guess what ? Paying staff minimum wage is part of the viability calculation. Right alongside rent, utilities, regulatory compliances, materials, etc, etc, etc.

        Why is this so difficult to grasp ? Paying workers minimum wage is no less an issue of law than not stealing all your raw supplies or not squatting in some premises without paying rent.

        The Brisbane entrepreneur who started up Eagle Boys Pizza looked to open a bakery chain after that first success but, in the end, he concluded it would never be viable because of weekend penalty rates. How many jobs were never created because this guy couldn’t make the numbers add up?

        From the description you’ve just given, none. You just outlined an unviable business model. At least, I’m assuming he also did the maths of charging more on weekends to cover the penalty rates (as some places do), and decided that customers would not have been prepared to pay extra to cover it.

        Or, in simpler terms, he found there was insufficient customer demand for his product.

        Strangely, one finds bakeries open on a Sunday. So presumably some people can make it work.

        To suggest that greed is central to entrepreneurs wanting to pay a pittance to their workers is wide of the mark.

        Uh huh. That’s why you nearly always find “entrepreneurs wanting to pay a pittance to their workers” going hand in hand with high salaries and bonuses for said “entrepreneurs”.

        If all businesses paid higher wages they would have to increase the prices of everything.

        Or take less profit. (Strange how this is never an option even though it balances the equation just as well.)

        The general retail sector is basically doomed (along with wages) as the FIRE sector hoovers up an ever greater proportion of people’s income.

        So, obviously, the solution is to pay the lowest income earners even less. Brilliant !

      • DominicMEMBER

        Smithy, we clearly grew up reading different economics text books. The one I found most useful (and most closely associated with reality) posits that unemployment levels are directly related to the presence of govt regulation and minimum wage legislation — which makes sense — as the minimum wage has a tendency to price certain people out of the market. Ditto regulations pertaining to the additional costs imposed upon businesses of hiring someone they find they no longer want.

      • drsmithyMEMBER

        And my grade ten physics textbook posited the idea of a perfect frictionless surface, along with numerous ideas and problems built on that assumption.

        But you don’t find frictionless surfaces in the real world.

        It’s hilarious that you raise decreasing incomes as a problem, yet you think a massive and systemic downward pressure on wages would be a good idea.

      • DRsmithy and others who feel that local business must pay minimum wage, why do we accept goods and lately, services from abroad who receive poverty wages if at all? What a bunch of hypocrites Australians are. Let’s even the playing field before there won’t be any small business paying anyone anything. All those in government or other cushy jobs can pay for the welfare of the rest. Nice!

      • DominicMEMBER

        “Paying staff minimum wage is part of the viability calculation. Right alongside rent, utilities, regulatory compliances, materials ..”

        By this logic you may as well set the minimum wage at $100 per hour or even $1,000 and state to the market: “It is what it is so suck it up” Sounds like a great business model — i.e. one with no customers!

        The issue is that you cannot bend economic laws to your will — something has to break. The thing that breaks first is the element that is easiest to manipulate / change. You can’t change the price of utilities, Govt-imposed costs etc so is it any wonder that wages are a target? Rents are more sticky but they will inevitably bust when retailers shut their doors in significant numbers. All costs that can come down will come down until goods and services can be provided at a price that is affordable by sufficient numbers of people. This is Econ 101.

        Consider this: perhaps if the Govt didn’t impose such an absurd burden on businesses (both financial and regulatory) the businesses may have more leeway to hire more people and raise da wages? Instead the deal looks like this: Govt says “hand us the fees, the taxes, levies, charges that we’ve demanded or go to f#cking jail, pleb!”

        Is it any wonder that employees are taking it in the rear end in an environment like that. And it’s hardly likely to improve as the blood-sucking parasites always need more.

      • drsmithyMEMBER

        By this logic you may as well set the minimum wage at $100 per hour or even $1,000 and state to the market: “It is what it is so suck it up” Sounds like a great business model — i.e. one with no customers!

        No, that would be an argumentum ad absurdum.

        The issue is that you cannot bend economic laws to your will — something has to break.

        Implied in the insistence we cannot pay living wages to people is the argument that we are literally incapable of producing enough goods to sustain our population. What, do you think, are the most significant constraining resources in that equation ?

        Consider this: perhaps if the Govt didn’t impose such an absurd burden on businesses (both financial and regulatory) the businesses may have more leeway to hire more people and raise da wages?

        LOL. Right up there with “cut our taxes and we’ll hire more people and pay them more, pinky swear !”. Something else you’ll find in a textbook that doesn’t happen in real life.

      • drsmithyMEMBER

        DRsmithy and others who feel that local business must pay minimum wage, why do we accept goods and lately, services from abroad who receive poverty wages if at all?

        Because the people making the rules (and the ones lobbying them) are the ones benefiting from the imbalance.

  2. the Sydney driver, an Indian migrant who is now an Australian permanent resident, was aged 30.

    Therein lies a huge problem. PR visas are given out way too quickly – they should be ordered to live in a regional area for 8 years first. Alternatively, bring in South African farmers who know how to farm instead of males from an even more corrupt nation.

  3. “ABC Radio recently highlighted the absurdity of Australia’s ‘skilled’ migration program in which skilled migrants have grown increasingly frustrated at not being able to gain work in Australia despite leaving their homelands to fill so-called ‘skills shortages’. As a result, they are now demanding that taxpayers provide government-sponsored internships to help skilled migrants gain local experience, and a chance to work in their chosen field.”

    I see that Innes Willox has just released a new compact with the ACTU where he promises to employ each and every one of the highly skilled taxi drivers in AiGroup companies – who will pay for all the education needs of this group. His son is getting the website organised now with all the exciting details.

    Before the site goes up I suggest that all underemployed brain surgeons and other badly needed professionals should immediately phone Willox’s organisation and claim their entitlement:

    1300 55 66 77 (ask for Innes Willox)

    Or visit his office at:

    Level 2 / 441 St Kilda Road
    Melbourne VIC 3004

    (Willox has offered to pay for your meter by CabCharge. Underground parking is available for the first 50 and his secretary will provide lunch. Let her know if you have special food requirements).

    The AiGroup and ACTU accept that it is clearly racist if people who got here via a visa program (who don’t actually have the unique skills they were supposed to have) are not given funds from private industry and the union movement to develop those skills here in Australia. Because the reason that we have highly skilled mathematicians, physicists and innovators driving taxis in Australia is almost always about skin colour, racism and bigotry. The AiGroup and the ACTU are going to foot the bill for this as they accept that those sponsoring and promoting immigration programmes must take responsibility for their policies.

  4. DarkMatterMEMBER

    The problem is that many small food business now rely on the delivery services to keep the doors open. Even if they take 30% of a $20 pizza, it is turnover.

    The low wages of the deliverers on push bikes is now baked into the system. If you try and get them $25 and red taped up with Fair Work etc, then the delivery system will fall in a heap.You can’t sell a $50 pizza, and you can’t make one that earns $5 after paying the delivery guy.

    There are two ways out of this – close down the fast food industry, or wait 5 years and let the robots deliver the pizza for $2.

      • DarkMatterMEMBER

        The low wages of the deliverers on push bikes is now baked into the system. If you try and get them $25 and red taped up with Fair Work etc, then the delivery system will fall in a heap.You can’t sell a $50 pizza, and you can’t make one that earns $5 after paying the delivery guy.

        That is the point – if the govt has the “balls” to enforce the wages, then the food business will fall over.

        Would you pay $30-50 for a delivered pizza so the delivery guy gets fair wages?

      • You miss the point DarkMatter. You may as well be arguing that a break even business could consider employing several people (migrants or otherwise) for no wages at all, just coz they are busy but can’t afford the wage bill. If they cant pay their workers the right amount, close the bloody doors. The response is not to just ignore the laws and get the tacit support of government by them turning a blind eye to it all. It’s pretty straight forward – since when did we become apologists to businesses that cheat?

      • DarkMatterMEMBER

        No, you missed the point. It is a Mexican Standoff.

        Just saying that the government should enforce the wage laws doesn’t work in reality. You might as well say the government should just lower the cost of housing. It is too late to “just” do stuff.

        “It’s pretty straight forward – since when did we become apologists to businesses that cheat?” Probably about the same time we became apologists to banking, housing and immigration ponzi. It is not straight forward at all, and simplistic black and white thinking doesn’t help.

        I don’t care much. Fine, let’s get the govt to man up and enforce wages for all these little guys. Watch the fun as this ripples through the various industries and doors get closed. Perhaps it will fix itself and the magic market will discover a way to have $25/hr deliverers, million dollar houses and $10 pizzas all happily co-existing.

        So, lets say you enforce the wages on deliveroo and uber-eats and so on. Next step they (try to) pass these cost on to the Hand Cooked Pizza shop. Hand Cooked Pizza shop knows nobody will buy a $30 pizza, so they cancel deliveries. The delivery guy has no job and the Pizza shop just fired half their staff or closed up. All these unemployed people now will be looking for $25+/hour jobs – and nobody can afford them because they bid up their house price to a million dollars and the bank is sucking them dry. It is a impasse. Think it through.

        As Flawse likes to say, “the answers lie back in time”. If we didn’t want a broken economy where wages and prices just don’t add up, we should have pulled the plug on our politicians 20 years ago. Magical thinking where you poke one little bit of the mess (that you are currently angry about) is probably not helpful.

      • DominicMEMBER

        This argument has parallels with the hand-wringing and angst by the Champagne lefties over ‘child labour’ many years ago. The children all eventually lost their jobs, along with the income they were providing their dirt-poor families and the Western (white) campaigners toasted this ‘success’ (with bubbly, of course) while the affected families starved. In modern parlance: winning!

        An example close to home: a mate of mine was working on a case here where a metal-fabrication company was in voluntary administration and the administrator was looking to keep the business running on a sustainable basis. A key element of this was negotiating a 10% pay cut with the union which would have saved most jobs (c. 100). The union official refused point blank, the company was closed for good and every single person lost their job. More ‘winning’!

        Dark Matter is simply describing a similar situation: if a business cannot be profitable it must, by definition, shut down. It’s cold, hard fact that a minimum wage (particularly one set at an unreasonable level) will lead to higher levels of unemployment — businesses have no choice to shut down, or, as we’re seeing in the U.S. staff get replaced by robots and automation.

      • drsmithyMEMBER

        The elephant in the room, of course, is the vast increase in incomes that have gone to the top few percent, to profits and to rent seekers.

        Deliveroo riders aren’t getting shortchanged because their jobs are untenable, they’re getting shortchanged because of greed.

      • DarkMatterMEMBER

        It is not OK.

        Nevertheless, can you see how crazy it is to suggest that the government enforce minimum wages while at the same time that same government has its hand firmly on the immigration spigot making the problem worse? Do you see the irony there?

      • drsmithyMEMBER

        Nevertheless, can you see how crazy it is to suggest that the government enforce minimum wages while at the same time that same government has its hand firmly on the immigration spigot making the problem worse?

        It’s not crazy to suggest minimum wage laws be enforced, regardless.

        It is silly not to also suggest they reduce immigration since that also has a negative impact on employment and wages.

        However, they are independent issues. Addressing one does not necessarily fix the problems of the other. Even without high immigration, we still need minimum wage laws.

        We can chew gum and walk at the same time.

    • Do you realise that some people tipped the driver $10-20 per delivery in 2004? Do you realise that people do not just order 1 pizza at a time?

      Some even get the pizza shop to deliver bottles of alcohol!

      Raising the legal minimum price of a delivery to $10 is not a profound change.

    • I understand your point of view, but at a macro level if you allow the argument “but jobs will be lost!” what happens if companies keep pushing lower and lower and you can’t stop it because citizens are being held hostage. Meanwhile businesses that *could* have operated at a higher level are closing their doors (and yes, sacking workers) because they can’t compete with the penny pinchers who keep tightening the belt.

      I’ve worked for a lot of companies that applied maximum pressure to employees, and frankly violated labor laws repeatedly. That money just goes to the business owner’s pockets. There are a lot of businesses that simply aren’t even trying to share the pie. They have developed an attitude that workers are indentured and ought to be thankful to have a job at all. It isn’t that they didn’t have the money, its that they didn’t want to share.

      In the case of the business you mentioned, maybe the union would genuinely rather keep the doors open for employers that aren’t cutting staff salaries, rather than allow one to remain open that is unhealthy and threatening the margins of their betters. Maybe its an out of touch moron union rep who thinks the business is secretly loaded, or maybe not. I’ve yet to meet a business that didn’t cry poor, including one that spent $20,000 per chair in its lobby.

      • DarkMatterMEMBER

        As above –

        Can you see how crazy it is to suggest that the government enforce minimum wages while at the same time that same government has its hand firmly on the immigration spigot making the problem worse? Do you see the irony there?

        My point has been that suggesting the government enforce fair wages is absurd given that they are actively causing the problem. When people say things like “the government should grow some balls and enforce fair wages”, it sort of suggests that the government is a useful tool for fixing things. If we could apply some “should” sauce to them, then we “should” have applied it to their immigration policy some time ago.

        Many people seem to still believe that we are a rules based society where policy like minimum wages and similar notions set the standard. That may just be wishful thinking, and reality for most people is quite ad hoc.

  5. The Wealth Navigator

    This all gets back to what you want to pay for things. If you are happy to pay say $10-$15 delivery then they can get a fairer deal. Also are you happy to pay a surcharge for sunday service then we can pay loadings.

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