Leith van Onselen talks mass immigration on Bolt Report

Above is the video of my appearance on The Bolt Report last night discussing the efficacy of Australia’s mass immigration program. Enjoy!

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Unconventional Economist
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      • The Traveling Wilbur

        LvO on the blot report! What other pending signs of the apocalypse can we expect next?

        PS Your head looks fine.

      • You’ve got a great voice, you could do very well on radio/tv media
        You look very young though

        But PLEASE unbutton your suit when you sit down
        And consider wearing a tie
        And orange is not the best choice of shirt colour

        • “You look very young though”

          I can’t help that. I’m 40 in January but look after myself health/diet wise.

          “But PLEASE unbutton your suit when you sit down
          And consider wearing a tie
          And orange is not the best choice of shirt colour”

          I had no idea that’s how I looked on Camera given I couldn’t see myself. I’ve also only got one suit and one shirt that fits. That’s the joy of working from home and losing 10 kgs by giving up refined carbs.

      • “You know what you need to do to make yourself look beautiful Leith”

        Buy more investment property?

      • What on Earth did you do to Bolt?
        He was calm , measured, even reasonable , up to a point.
        Never seen him like this before.

      • @Coming: I rarely criticise comments here (or on any site) because it just detracts from the quality of conversation BUT you are just totally wrong on the question of appearance.

        Leith’s appearance projected: capable / no BS / sincere / knows exactly what he is talking about / not beholden to any particular interest group.
        Dressing up like Bolt did, for example, would just signal obsequious / not to be trusted / second rate hack / AM TV chat show panelist wannabe.

        However, I agree completely that Leigh’s voice is an enormous plus.

      • Coming and d672c,

        Thinking like this is part of the problem, it shouldn’t matter what UE’s voice sounds like, it should be the substance behind what he says that matters. It never fails to amaze me that people will be more accepting of an argument based on image over substance.

      • reusachtigeMEMBER

        Please, no tie and fancy suit, I see enough of that at the property seminars (and I’m the only one around here that’s good looking enough to pull off a bow and no shirt!) Dressing up too much would make you look like you are better looking than you really are and you don’t want that. For your angle you were spot on.

      • @Dennis, you are right of course BUT if anyone is trying to get any airplay in trying to communicate ideas and persuade they have to accept this admittedly flawed thinking that elevates image over substance. And with respect, surely you have observed this wretched phenomenon enough by now to temper your amazement somewhat each time you encounter it? It has been around since the dawn of time.

        I would love to fix it, but I first want to see the widest possible exposure for the message that we are f#cking this country with current levels of immigration and from that hopefully a change to public policy. Then I want three new teaching hospitals in Sydney. Then I will be 100% on board with trying to get the masses to look for substance over style…

      • Evolis might do the trick for you, UE. Getting good vibes from consumers. And it is an Australian-owned product to boot. Give it a try.

    • fitzroyMEMBER

      +1 good to see you putting it out there. Now see if you can say the same thing on SBS. Then try Q&A, Lateline and Background Briefing.

      • ErmingtonPlumbingMEMBER

        I’m most looking forward to seeing Leith on ABCs “the Drum”,… preferably with Sarah Hanson-Young also as a panelists.
        I’d be videotaping that one for sure!
        😘

      • fitzroyMEMBER

        They sure are! EP has a good suggestion about the Drum, and I personally would like to see UE and SHY in a mud bath together. I’m sure it would rate well.

  1. Bloody good. You lads need a regular spot on commercial free to air to bring factual points to the masses of sheep.

  2. UE, my hero. The perception of growth, ergo the perception of wealth. Got to keep the dream alive!

    • I asked this website to stop publishing juvenile images – that surely helped to make this website more acceptable to more people.

  3. sydboy007MEMBER

    love how bolt makes this a labor issue. it’s both parties you fracker. toss in the greens to make the salad tastier.

      • sydboy007MEMBER

        it’s what annoys me with the modern political and media set. you can’t say anything negative about your team. Maybe if you actually criticised them when it’s a valid criticism they wont be making the same stoopid mistakes year after year.

    • I never voted for the Federal LNP but the ALP should offer an alternative.

      I get that Howard privatised SYD airport. But why did not the ALP buy it back? Why did Gillard not give me a carbon compo cheque?

      No wonder social media produced images saying “Liboral Party”.

  4. I think TV interviews should be made copyright-free after 7 days. The guests generally do not get paid to appear but the TV show makes money by having guests.

    • sydboy007MEMBER

      Do you mean like what Antifa were saying during the G20 protests – “Everything for Everyone”?

      Property rights are the cudgel the neocons keep the masses subjugated by /sarc

  5. Pay tv has declining subscribers and Bolt sounds like infomercial host
    BUT
    the story was cohesive and well composed bar for Bolt 3x mentioning stigmatising “ethnic crime”

    Well done!

    • GeordieMEMBER

      Yeah, that really irked me as there was no evidence presented to support it, just snide remarks. Instantly undermines his credibility.

      • drsmithyMEMBER

        I think you might be misunderstanding the basis of the Bolter’s “credibility”.

      • You don’t believe some identifiable immigrant groups have disproportionately (i.e. statistically different from the population mean) higher crime levels?
        Or is everyone who is fresh off the boat a clean slate, an innocent white sheet of cloth, sullied only by our society subsequently?
        If there was a betting algorithm that predicted the likelihood of criminal activity of an individual migrant based on the performance of earlier migrants with similar characteristics, it would make money.
        We could (hypothetically) even outsource migration to private sector companies that pay a fine for every migrant that commits a crime. The private sector companies would then start discriminating in accepting applications in order to maximise profits.

      • drsmithyMEMBER

        You don’t believe some identifiable immigrant groups have disproportionately (i.e. statistically different from the population mean) higher crime levels?

        I believe that pretty much everyone making that claim hasn’t done anything remotely close to a comprehensive analysis of all the factors relevant to crime, nor has any interest in addressing root causes.

        Heck, I’d be staggered if they’d even tried something as obvious and basic as adjusting for income levels. Let alone fancy stuff like education, employment, medical history or family arrangements.

        Or is everyone who is fresh off the boat a clean slate, an innocent white sheet of cloth, sullied only by our society subsequently?

        LOL. Punish the straw man. PUNISH HIM !

        If there was a betting algorithm that predicted the likelihood of criminal activity of an individual migrant based on the performance of earlier migrants with similar characteristics, it would make money.

        Why just migrants ? Why not use an algorithm to bet on the likelihood of criminal activity across the whole population ? Precrime FTW !

      • GeordieMEMBER

        @drsmithy

        Yeah, I’ve never even seen a half-arse attempt to back up claims that some immigrants increase levels of criminal activity. Everything always comes back to socio-economic fundamentals; if you’re in poverty, you’re more likely to resort to crime to survive.

      • @ Ashley

        “You don’t believe some identifiable immigrant groups have disproportionately (i.e. statistically different from the population mean) higher crime levels?”

        “ethnic crime” undoubtedly implies indiscriminate and an innate inclination of a certain ethnicity/ies towards crime.
        it pretty much means that a person of a certain ethnicity will resort to crime even if isolated from own peers and brought up in unrelated non-criminal environment.
        Sort of like… all the descendants of the convicts in Australia (Irish?) *must* have crime inclination.

    • Yeah it’s statements like “ethnic crime” that mean I can’t take bolt seriously, makes him look like that Muslim lady on SBS that’s off to London after saying all Aussie’s are racists!

      But excellent that LVO is getting the facts out to Bolt’s supporters

  6. Good interview, the only improvement that I’d suggest would be to tie in the point about Japan shifting to Automation to maintain their productivity despite the effects of an aging population. Unfortunately Australia would be unable to follow Japan’s lead without specific targeted immigration aimed at dramatically increasing our intake of skilled Automation Engineers AND a federal government led program to ensure that these Immigrant engineers are not wasting their time by coming to Australia. Both of these would be expensive undertakings over the short term and require political, social and economic buy-in from the average Aussie battler. This is about the point that I give up on this ever happening, Menzies faced a similar dilemma wrt the industrialization of post war Australia and succeed in selling his vision to the Aussie people. His visions were the economic green-shoots that gave birth to our Automotive industry, I suspect that modern day Aussies can only see the follies of their parents / grand-parents generation and have little desire to rinse and repeat today.
    Without a solution to this dilemma it’s a little disingenuous to even suggest that Australia can follow Japan’s lead, if you can tie up this loose end then imo you’ll have a much stronger argument.

    • fitzroyMEMBER

      Local engineers are competing against sub continental waged via 457s. It is total BS. We have just closed the new Toyota factory. We can do whatever we want if we chose to do so. It just requires slaughtering a few sacred cows. The Japanese have a much more cohesive society and look after their own. Our society is less cohesive to start with and is falling apart

      • Local engineers are competing against sub continental waged via 457s
        No doubt about it, they call this a dilemma for good reason.
        Interestingly China faced a similar inflection point back in the mid 1990’s. They had sent many Chinese Engineers and Scientists abroad to study and wanted them to return to China and help China grow. Trouble was there really weren’t that many jobs for highly skilled Engineers in China (and even less opportunities for their Scientists) each returning Engineer stole the job from someone that had labored long and hard in that position. Growth is the only solution to this problem, as a government you need to invest your limited resources wisely and look at other unconventional means to achieve your objective. wrt China one of the unconventional means was the Government allocation of land to these newly established companies led by returning Chinese. Often this took the form of land for the factory and housing for all the senior executives both of which they got to keep regardless of the outcome. A similar program in Australia would go a long way towards ensuring its success.

    • “without specific targeted immigration aimed at dramatically increasing our intake of skilled Automation Engineers”

      You keep repeating this idea. The lack of innovative engineers is NOT the problem. The problem is that the economic and social conditions in Australia are hostile to innovation. We had great universities and they turned out great engineers, and then we trashed them. The idea that you just bring more in from OS and innovation will flourish is just wishful thinking.

      I suspect that you have no practical experience in this field. To support innovation you need a network of various skilled people, and once that collapses, it is very hard to replace. The other thing is that you probably need to take a close look at some of the “experts” that come into Australia with a CS or Engineering degree, especially from the sub-continent. In cases I have seen they have no practical experience at all. How about an honours student in mechatronics that had to be taught not to cross thread screws?

      Yes, Mr BlackFella, just bring in more automation engineers and that will fix everything! Magic Pudding solutions to fix a Magic Pudding economy.

      • The problem is that the economic and social conditions in Australia are hostile to innovation. We had great universities and they turned out great engineers, and then we trashed them.
        No argument from me, no argument at all. That is indeed exactly what happened but understanding how hopeless we are does absolutely nothing to address the likely productivity gap that will develop as a result of our aging population. Broad spectrum Immigration is one solution to this problem. Automation is another….Simply ignoring blindingly obvious demographic problems is not usually considered a solution, however we are talking about Australia….

      • Broad spectrum Immigration is one solution to this problem. Automation is another…

        You are not making sense. You are just repeating yourself. Why is broad spectrum immigration a solution? We are currently importing several hundred thousand immigrants a year and no turnaround yet. In fact, we are clogging up the cities and making it even harder for anyone to do a tech startup. If the lack of automation engineers is a problem, why don’t we just fix the universities we have already established and revive the engineering courses? That would have a determined outcome and not involve pot luck from a 200K immigrant intake.

        Part of the answer to these questions is that the world of innovation doesn’t work like it did in the past. No more Nicola Tesla types coming off the boat and changing the world. Now, if you have a good idea, you would probably KickStart it, get it prototyped with 3D printers and small fabs in China and go from there. You would look at a world market. There is no Australian market – apart from a rounding error.

        Unfortunately, your magic pudding ideas about immigration “fixing” things are a prime example of the enormous problem people like UE are facing addressing this issue. It is like a religion. A cargo cult fascinated by the novelty of endless new faces coming off the plane and straight into the cities.

      • Just for accuracy sake, I wasn’t the one that proposed Automation as a solution LVO’s you’re man and it’s his solution.
        All I’m saying is that the Automation solution is only even imaginable IF you have the skills to implement this solution, IMO Australia (as it is today) lacks the skilled human capital and the engineering/manufacturing/supply infrastructure to even contemplate this path, which leaves us with….
        Australia of the late 1990’s was a very different country and who knows where we’d be today if the Technology greenshoots from that era had been properly nurtured. We all know that this didn’t happen instead we found that our economy had a Technology reverse gear so we selected it and hit the accelerator hard…the rest is history.
        Your solutions all seem to be post growth, which is great, but that reality will itself herald a new beginning, complete with its own Magic pudding problems.

      • We are not talking about Automation being important – it is inevitable. It is the idea that we can fix our problems with immigration that just doesn’t make sense. How will importing people replace all that lost technology infrastructure?

        It comes down again to a faith based argument that the immigrants will somehow repair the damage we have done by shooting ourselves in the foot.

        Your solutions all seem to be post growth, which is great, but that reality will itself herald a new beginning, complete with its own Magic pudding problems.

        What?? Post growth? I have no idea what you are saying.

        Also, ” as a solution LVO’s you’re man” – you’re is a contraction of “you are”, so this sentence also doesn’t make sense.

        So far most of what you are saying is an irrational belief in the magic of growth. Perhaps you should be a politician?

      • @DM Sorry if I made no sense I was in a hurry to post
        Lets dissect the choices that come with the looming demographic boomer aging problem
        1) All genYers decide to have 3 kids and we create our own future work force
        2) we import people to do the necessary jobs to maintain our economy and the well being of our aging population
        3) We find Automated solutions that enable Aussies to deliver greater productivity across the tasks that we expect in the emerging economy
        4) We all scale back on our expectations and standard of living, aka post growth/smaller GDP possibly with higher per capita GDP (and possibly not)

        I don’t know of any other solutions.
        Of the above
        1)seems highly unlikely especially given the insane mortgages they’re expected to take on.
        2) is the current Big Australia solution
        3) Is impossible to execute without importing the request talent
        and 4) is a post growth utopia…maybe
        Logically as an economy we have to pick one or a combination of the 4 sections and implement/execute the tasks or suffer the consequences that arise from our failure. That’s all I’m saying.
        As for LVO’s suggestion that Automation will be a part of the solution, I’m not convinced that we can count on the Benefits of Automation being there for us unless we invest heavily in it now. To suggest a solution exists that you know full well you can not execute is a tad deceptive, so if LVO wants to include it in his solution space then he needs to flesh out how it will happen, what tasks are necessary what people are needed stc, or risk BS being called out on this point.

      • Why would we need to import talent? We just buy the automation. The idea that we have to import engineers to make the automation happen is not sensible. Most of the “experts” we are bringing in are fake. They have no real skills. This is the thing you just don’t seem to grasp. It is not just a paint by numbers broad spectrum immigration utopia.

        The idea that immigrants are going to solve our problems is just silly. We have run high immigration for well over 5 years , and according to your doctrine, that should have solved the problems in automobile manufacture. Nope. There is just no evidence that high immigration solves anything, except ticket clipping. Why don’t you just present to us a real, measurable example of how open slather immigration has made a real difference.

    • DM, I find I write “you’re” instead of “your” all the time, only after I post (if using an I pad with smaller writing). I would like to think its the autocorrect…, maybe I’m just careless..

    • There is plenty of scope for shifting real estate agents and banksters over to automation, the only difficulty will be stopping some ethical fo from programming the robots with Asimov’s three laws.

  7. Looking at many Bolt segments on youtube … you can expect to get anywhere between 300 – 10,000 views of your segment. The more controversial topics (Islam) get around 60,000.

    I don’t reckon you threw enough bait into the discussion to get to 60,000 … but well done nonetheless … and agree with earlier comment about tipping point. People are waking up, joining dots and want to know what the hell is causing our degradation in living standards AND what the hell are our politicians doing to address it (we know the answer to that).

  8. Tassie TomMEMBER

    Great interview UE.

    I’m glad you got in the point about how Australia’s export wealth is largely from a fixed pool of resources, which is being diluted.

    Bolt almost behaved himself too – you must have coached him well.

    • boyracerMEMBER

      Bolt couldn’t resist a few comments about “ethnic crime” but overall I agree he was restrained and wanted to talk about the facts and almost brought himself to say it was the fault of both sides (he just inferred the Libs while he mentioned Labor by name).

      I wish they’d delved a bit deeper into why the topic of immigration is so taboo – they danced around the edges a bit but it needs to be talked about more. Understand time was probably an issue.

      I was very happy to hear LVO talk about immigrants “hopping off the planes” rather than them “getting off the boats”. That needs reinforcing in the debate.

      Overall pretty good interview. Need more like it.

      • Tassie TomMEMBER

        Bolt almost looked naughty when he said “ethical crime” on one instance. It had no place in his sentence, but he just couldn’t help himself and had to squeeze it in, and then he knew he’d been naughty and behaved himself afterwards.

        I agree – “hopping off planes” was a nice touch. Of course, LVO would have lost all credibility if he’d said “hopping off boats”, but he could have said “arriving” instead of “hopping off planes”, but I like “hopping off planes”.

  9. Well done. Need some suit adjustment, my 2c.

    Otherwise great job, presented well and I could actually stand Bolt this time around.

    • Haha fair call! But honestly I want to see this guy get more air time and eyeballs – every little thing counts.

      • That was the first tiem I’ve seen him. I was also pleasantly surprised. PM material 🙂

  10. Great interview, well paced, structured responses. No specific blaming that would trigger Bolt.
    Is it just me, or does his tone seem to be getting smoother and smoother? It’s practically verbal cursive writing. Nothing wrong with that, perhaps a transition to smooth FM in his retirement?

    But seriously, great interview!

  11. ceteris paribus

    Great interview. Congrats.
    Of course, Bolt just couldn’t help himself. His tangential references to cultural harmony and ethnic crime. Australia would be much more harmonious with the Bolts of this world moving out. And where is his criminological data to prove that crime springs purely from the factor of ethnicity? Stupid as well as grubby.
    He was also playing the band for Abbott- of course.
    Bolt again illustrates how it is so hard to have a rational debate about immigration, sustainability and numbers alone in this nation without denigrating other people simply because they may be ethnically different.

    • But about all the riff raff caused by the Apex gang in parts of Melbourne. Lots of young blokes with dark skin doing smash and grab robberies and car jackings. The numbers of these crimes have increased dramatically over the last few years. I’m sure we don’t record the crime by skin colour or ethnic group, but anyone following the media reports knows it’s a specific group of children born from refugees from parts of Africa… I don’t think it’s racist to call it out as a problem. How we deal with it is another matter though.

      • drsmithyMEMBER

        I’m sure we don’t record the crime by skin colour or ethnic group, but anyone following the media reports knows it’s a specific group of children born from refugees from parts of Africa… I don’t think it’s racist to call it out as a problem.

        The racist part is the unsubtle implication that ALL “children born from refugees from parts of Africa” are engaging in “smash and grab robberies and car jackings”.

        (Which is, of course, the whole point of identifying them by their skin colour – so when Granny is walking down the street and some young darkie is coming at here in the opposite direction she knows to cross over so she doesn’t get bashed and robbed. It’s a great way to build social cohesion, I’ve heard.)

      • Don’t read into what is not written. The problem is your inference, not his writing. It is not racist, its honest.

      • kiwikarynMEMBER

        Just wait until they grow up a bit, when the children of refugees become the first wave of home grown terrorists. Something to look forward to.

      • #notallmen- derision, ridicule, don’t try that little trick to escape your male privilege and responsibility
        #notallchildrenofrefugees- eminently sensible point, don’t tar them all with the same brush

      • drsmithyMEMBER

        Don’t read into what is not written. The problem is your inference, not his writing.

        LOL. I’ll have to remember that the next time someone mentions “Taqiyya”.

      • The racist part is the unsubtle implication that ALL “children born from refugees from parts of Africa” are engaging in “smash and grab robberies and car jackings”.

        Point taken, but we also can’t mollycoddle people based on race to protect them from the reality that there is a problem within their community or ethnic group. Of course we need their community leaders to sit down with police etc.. to try and engage with them and figure out how to tackle this problem. The mere fact that so many young blokes of African decent are causing this problem is more of a problem as it stands to give the community the perception that there is a problem with African refugee’s (and there is, but of course not all turn bad and that’s important to remember too).

        The real problem though comes back to the fact that we’re creating a society of have and have not’s, so really it’s an economic problem with a lack of participation in the economic pie by certain groups who have been shut out weather by design or circumstance it doesn’t matter. The fact it’s happening is the problem.

        Therefore simply bringing in more of the same without tackling the root cause of the problem will just lead to more problems. Which is why we shouldn’t be so eager to just import more and more folks.

      • drsmithyMEMBER

        Point taken, but we also can’t mollycoddle people based on race to protect them from the reality that there is a problem within their community or ethnic group.

        I don’t think anyone is being “mollycoddled” in any systemic fashion.

        Other than that, can’t really disagree with anything you’ve written there. It’s an economic problem (poor support, wealth inequality, lack of opportunities) first, and pretty much everything else second (if not third). Which is why focussing on those second- and third-level issues won’t fix any problems, just move them around.

    • FiftiesFibroShack

      “He was also playing the band for Abbott”

      That would be a big part of why LvO was on.

      “His tangential references to cultural harmony and ethnic crime.”

      That is the main reason. It’s the real agenda of Bolt, Abbott, et al. They haven’t suddenly started to care that poor people aren’t getting a fair go.

  12. Not many clog wogs on tele. We just got two at the same time! That’s like having two Muslims on at once. Enrichment!

  13. How is Bolt in person, Leith? Does the private persona differ from the public one?
    Can he be reasoned with? Does he get it?

    • If you look very closely he has horns poking through his hair. He has the devil’s tongue. Don’t listen or read his content in case you get led astray!

    • I was very impressed with Bolt. Very nice bloke. A real gentleman. We chatted a while on general stuff and he was genuinely engaging seemed interested.

      Never judge a book by the cover.

    • ErmingtonPlumbingMEMBER

      I see Bolt the same way I see Alan Jones and Tony Abbott , all fake populist, that will run with an issues from time to time, that actually does represent the concerns of the working and lower middle class,… while at the same time, relentlessly undermining these same people, in support of those they really wish to impress and who write their current and/or future paychecks. They are paid partisan, Forked toothed sellouts.

      I applaud Leiths performance though and liked to see Macrobusiness.com.au, getting plugged and reaching out to a broader audience.
      Our Democracy is becoming increasingly imperiled by concentrated media ownership and the collapse of the journalism professions, revenue models.
      Google and Facebook are much to blame for this collapse and the resulting gap in reliable, unbiased news and information is creating a very different “News Market”.
      Sites like Macrobusiness could end up bearing a lot more responsibility,…so for the sake of our Democracy, chip in freeloaders, and pay the MB subscription, so Dave and Leith can afford some better fitting clothes, decent hair cuts and the Uber fares to the Radio and TV studios of Australia.
      Let us hope fame does not corrupt them.

      7 out of 10 young Australians say they would never pay for online news,…that’s a problem,…most of all for them.

      http://www.abc.net.au/mediawatch/transcripts/s4699615.htm

      • I think the death of the media is a good thing. Social media and groups like us will have more power.

        20 years this bubble has been going, cheered on every step of the way by all of the big media companies. Still is. They must be making at least some money. So they can just trim down, not so much entertainment and lifestyle stuff, no big deal.

      • fitzroyMEMBER

        I don’t. I think Alan Jones is appalling. I think Tony Abbott is dishonest. You may not remember this clip EP
        https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=liplU86amFI Is it seriously contended that his meeting with the Cardinal was something he forgot?
        Bolt says what he honestly thinks, which may not be correct, but he has views that do not sit well with a number of contributors to this site.

  14. So, I guess the only segment of society that won’t support your point of view on all of this Leith, is well, the millions of Boomers who own the vast majority of the country’s real estate assets. After all, it would be unthinkable to take any action that would devalue these assets even slightly, no matter how great the net positive impact to the quality of life of all the nation’s citizens! Greedy old pricks!

    • Not necessarily. Gen y is cucked to the bone. Just look at all the tippy toeing around here, gotta be PC, cant hurt anyone’s fee fees, that puts the issue very much on the defensive straight away, you can’t win in such a position.

      Therefore, in the absence of a crash, big Australia will continue and it will happen by force, people will just get fed up with how hard it is in Sydney and Melbourne and move somewhere else.

      • boyracerMEMBER

        Tania,

        Given the apparent rise in “rentvesting” by gen x/y it might in my opinion be more useful to compare the % that owns a PPOR & an IP.

        To your point that blaming just the boomers is incorrect I agree.

      • In the 25 to 34 year age group, 34% own their own homes.

        https://theconversation.com/whats-the-key-to-home-ownership-for-gen-y-60637

        If all the Gen Y investment property owners are “rentvesting” (which I doubt), that means that 56% of Gen Y own at least one property (PPOR or investment). Roughly 80% of baby boomers are home owners, and there is no question that it was easier back in the day when houses were going for 3-4 times the median wage. The current inflated house prices are the fault of the politicians, most of whom aren’t baby boomers, as Houses and Holes has clearly explained today, and the top 0.1% of the population who pull their strings, not retired postmen or hospital cleaners.

  15. Singapore has had higher population growth and rising per capita income. If we have competitive tax rates and attract companies to Australia and allow them to bring who they need to operate competitively on a global level, we will experience rising per capita income. Next time you write on this subject, please include Singapore in your charts.

    • reusachtigeMEMBER

      Yeah lets be like Singapore where a large percentage of their dog boxes are provided by the government and the likes of me have a hard time getting rich off property. Commie!

  16. CatfishwolfMEMBER

    Really well done Leith.
    The more you do of these the better you’ll get too.

  17. Great work LvO! I realise this data may not exist but what would really tip the balance in this discussion would be to segment the GDP growth per capita by net worth or even income. The big end of town, real estate parasites and specufestors etc will have grown their % of gdp significantly and if growth overall is near zero, then the other 90% must have gone backwards in a big way?

  18. Regarding the point about Japan, what everyone seems to forget (or maybe never knew) is that Japan is yet to cash in on the so-called demographic dividend of women entering the workforce en masse. This is something that happened in most developed/Western countries in, what, the 80s and 90s(?) and while it is obviously something you can only do once, it sure does juice economic growth (in the form of increased household earnings, savings, consumption etc.)

    In Japan’s case, the US has been urging Japan for years to take measures to keep married women/mothers in full-time permanent employment and the country has only recently finally got around to it, to the point where it was one of the “three arrows” of Mr Abe’s Abeonomics policy.

    Of course, the Japanese patriarchy would prefer to keep women whatever the Japanese equivalent of “barefoot and pregnant” is just as it would prefer to keep immigrants out of the country, but in view of the incredibly fast population shrinkage plus two decades of deflation they are finally coming around to the proposition as it is still preferable to importing lots of migrant workers. But don’t worry, like I mentioned above, it only works once. Once the effect has worn off, Japan will be importing migrants just as fast as every other developed country.

  19. Leith, is the ponzi too important for you to go dipping your toe in the Loon pond?

    Serious qurstion as it could wreck your credibility with sane people.

  20. one million people every 2.5 years?! where are the jobs for those mass migrating to Australia? Australia doesn’t
    even have that many industries. Are there any research on where most recent immigrants work/what kind of jobs they have or what kind of businesses they start?