Coalition to age Australia with elderly parent visas

By Leith van Onselen

As if 15 years of rampant population growth (immigration), clogged roads and public transport, unaffordable housing, and degrading public services wasn’t enough. During the federal election campaign last year, both major parties committed to doubling-down on the population ponzi by allowing parents of Australian residents to migrate here on five-year visas. From SBS:

The Coalition has promised a continuous five-year visa for parents of Australian residents, currently offered to only to those applicants on a case-to-case basis who have lodged a concurrent permanent parental visa application.

If re-elected, the Coalition will remove the requirement for these parents to have lodged a concurrent permanent parental visa application.

“The Coalition recognises that many Australians, including our growing South Asian and Chinese communities, face particular pressures through the separation of children from parents and grandchildren from grandparents,” Peter Dutton said…

Unveiling its ‘Long Stay Parental Visa’ policy, the Labor last week promised a parental visa that would allow parents of migrants a continuous stay of three years. Labor’s proposal also has the conditions a mandatory private Australian insurance policy and a $5000 bond for each applicant.

At the time I argued that this was an utterly stupid proposal that would be detrimental to existing residents. This is because these migrants would add pressure to an already strained system and would not work, pay taxes, or contribute in a meaningful way to the economy. Moreover, existing residents would be required to foot the bill for the additional federal government investment in hospitals and infrastructure to keep up with the expected migrant influx.

Now, The Guardian reports that the Federal Budget will announce measures that will grant 15,000 visas a year to elderly parents of migrants at a cost of only $10,000:

Aged parents of migrants will get access to 15,000 five-year temporary visas at $10,000 each under changes expected to be announced in next week’s budget.

Parents will need to hold private health insurance and have financial support through a bond from their children before the visa would be approved…

Peter Dutton, said the government wanted to help families reunite without adding extra cost to the health system.

“The Coalition recognises that many Australians, including our growing south Asian and Chinese communities, face particular pressures through the separation of children from parents and grandchildren from grandparents,” Dutton said. “We want to help families reunite and spend time together, while ensuring that we do so in a way that does not burden Australia’s healthcare system.”

Sure, the policy will require these migrants to have private health insurance. But given that they would be old, and likely be heavy users of health services, they will place upward pressure on private health insurance premiums for everyone else.

Currently, an uninsured non-resident who turns up at an emergency department gets full treatment irrespective of whether they can or will pay. If they are sick enough (e.g. having a heart attack) they go to the top of the queue and everyone else waits. The costs just end up on a growing list of unpaid and noncollectable debts on a health department ledger.

These elderly migrants will also place greater pressure on health care professionals – both private and public – whose training is paid for, to a large extent, by the taxpayer.

More broadly, Australia’s infrastructure, public services, housing affordability, and overall living standards are already under strain. Adding aging migrants into the mix will only exacerbate the decline.

It’s also worth pointing out that the Productivity Commission’s (PC) Migrant Intake Australia report, released last year, recommended significantly tightening parental visas and raising their price, given they are costing taxpayers an estimated $335 000 to $410 000 per adult, or between $2.6 and $3.2 billion in present value terms (and growing):

There is a strong case for a substantial increase in visa pricing in relation to some elements of the family reunion stream. This would provide scope to recoup at least a portion of the high fiscal costs typically associated with immigrants in this category. In the medium term, the allocation of parent visas should be revised…

The contributory visa charge of just under $50 000 meets only a fraction of the fiscal costs for the annual intake of roughly 7200 contributory parents. And an additional 1500 parents make a minimal contribution. Overall, the cumulated lifetime fiscal costs (in net present value terms) of a parent visa holder in 2015-16 is estimated to be between $335 000 and $410 000 per adult, which ultimately must be met by the Australian community. On this basis, the net liability to the Australian community of providing assistance to these 8700 parents over their lifetime ranges between $2.6 and $3.2 billion in present value terms. Given that there is a new inflow each year, the accumulated taxpayer liabilities become very large over time. This is a high cost for a relatively small group.

Ultimately, every dollar spent on one social program must require either additional taxes or forgone government expenditure in other areas. It seems unlikely that parent visas meet the usual standards of proven need, in contrast to areas such as mental health, homelessness or, in the context of immigration, the support of immigrants through the humanitarian stream, and foreign aid.

Given the balance of the costs and benefits, the case for retaining parent visas in their current form is weak.

Rather than heed the PC’s advice, and reduce the burden on taxpayers, the Coalition has instead chosen to increase the quantity of elderly migrants flowing into Australia, thus adding to strains on infrastructure, housing, the Budget, as well as exacerbating the aging of the population.

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Unconventional Economist

Comments

  1. This is madness.
    $150 million in visa fees for old aged useless non contributing third world Asians and Indians with a $4.1 billion health and welfare cost.
    A $4 billion cost to Australia !
    Blatant third world dumping of their old sick useless info Australia. Sydney & Melbourne already heaving fetid third world migrant slums on welfare living in squalor.

    Where are the street protests ?
    Where are the young people or citizens angry about being sold out, this unbelievable burden placed on them.
    And how much more like this ?
    200,000 -300,000 citizen & residency grants a year
    We find out 75% are totally unskilled
    And also containing large numbers of non English speaking non assimilated useless & old & sick third world migrants only here to steal.
    Time for a Royal Commission into the whole visa and migration racket.

    • naturaltrust

      Families should be able to support their elderly.

      The problem is the majority of younger immigrants should not have been allowed into the country to begin with.

      We need a ZERO net population target and then some elderly can come in under that plan without increasing the population.


      • Families should be able to support their elderly.

        They can – by remaining in their country of birth.

      • Baruch Spinoza

        Yeah – that is just utter bullshit.

        They can send money home – if they need to be with their family physically – go home.

        If people intend to come here like that – ZERO health facilities. ZERO public benefits – absolutely ZERO.

        Completely fucking insane.

      • “Families should be able to support their elderly.
        They can – by remaining in their country of birth”

        Families who are allowed to bring their elderly relatives are more likely to vote for the party who allows this, as well as potential votes from the elderly newcomers themselves. Besides, they keep the housing Ponzi going. All good for politicians, therefore it’s a goer. Don’t ever get trapped into thinking that pollies (and governments) are doing anything for the betterment of the country.

      • Researchtime

        Happened in the UK – all of Europe arrived to get free health care and destroyed the institution…

    • Saint Matthew

      After the protestations from the Indian government about changes to the 457, and now this, it is obvious Australia is being governed by the Asian elites. Thousands of Australians died in wars believing they were defending the nation from invasion – and now Australians meekly surrender. Those that defended it did so because they valued it, because they built it. The Boomers inherited it without building anything and are giving it away as they don’t value it. Australia would have been better off letting the Japanese have it 70 years ago.

    • Wow, the migration nation is happy to take in tax paying highly skilled workers but doesn’t want them to have any ‘normal’ family support. What do you think will happen to the future generation if there is no support for these children?
      Parents are both forced to work to afford the cost of childcare and to save for a home.
      The people complaining here have never had the misfortune to be ‘forced’ to migrate because of violence like my family had to. My father was murdered, stabbed to death for his jacket and pure hatred… and I would hate that to happen to my mother who is ageing!!! We can afford the visas, and the healthcare but some in worse situations cant.
      And no I’m not from Asia! Educate yourselves, stop looking for issues, you are TOO blessed.

    • You wouldn’t offer a colossal sweetener like that if you weren’t worried the existing sweeteners had/ were about to stop(ped) working.

  2. Funny – a side effect will be to considerably increase death rates (i.e. by increasing the proportion of the population that is elderly), and in fact by breaking the health system, they will probably increase death rates twice.

    Long funeral homes.

    • Conservatives do not care about the welfare or healthcare systems. The plan is and has always been to get rid of welfare and switch to user-pays healthcare.

      Long pitchfork manufacturers.

    • Broke my femur in January, done on the public health the next day, healing well as expected with a view to full recovery before too long.

      Side effect when coming off my road bike at time of accident was a mangled right testicle, which is ok now but unfortunately a recent ultrasound has revealed a rather large benign cyst – yeah hung like an old bull now – lol……

      But to get the job done here in Australia by a specialist will now take more than 12 months on the public health – 4 months wait just to see a specialist to discuss the matter, waiting list for an operation somewhere north of 9 months. And this thing is not getting any smaller. I reckon in 12 months time I may need a wheelbarrow to cart the damn thing around in…

      So wife and I are heading off to Bangkok in July to get it done at a private hospital – wife is Thai and used to work at the hospital we are both registered with. No waiting list fortunately and can get the job done in the first week we are there. The public hospital system is also very good in Bangers and leaves our health system which is under immense strain looking very third world by comparison.

      Long boiled rope manufacturers….

      • Ignorant comment Andrew……far safer to get the job done in the hands of true professionals than the rabble that operate at the local hospital in my home town – the 12 month lead time for a very simple operation makes me none to happy either.

        As I stated above in comparison our hospitals verge on third world status……

  3. I think this is a good idea. It allows skilled immigrants to be with family and raise families.

    The reality is, skilled immigration isn’t the boost to our economy we like to think it is, it has disadvantages.

    • Initial boost, followed by drag due to misallocation of resources (for example, resources fail to be allocated to training)

    • Initial boost, followed by drag due to misallocation of resources (for example, resources fail to be allocated to training)

    • Nobody should migrate to Australia (or anywhere for that matter) with the expectation of bringing their elderly parents.

      If they are worried about being apart from their parents, they should stay home.

      • PlanetraderMEMBER

        Totally agree UE. If these immigrants are so concerned about being close to their family, why don’t they head back from whence they came. Why should it be a one-way street?

      • LSWCHPMEMBER

        Exactly. This is fucking insane. Whenever I think our politicians couldn’t do anything more stupid than they already have, they introduce yet another visa class that makes things worse for everybody who already lives here.

        Why in gods name are we going to import jumbo loads of elderly, non-contributing and probably non English speaking immigrants. What’s the benefit to anybody? FFS, I need to drink heavily before I rupture something.

      • @LSWCHP,

        My best guess is that it’s to make it less likely that existing PRs return home to care for their parents, which would depress NOM, in turn probably to ensure the construction bubble which is all that’s left keeps going.
        So I guess the answer to the ‘who benefits’ question is ‘Harry Triguboff’.

      • Saint Matthew

        And yet the same mouths tell young Australians to move hundreds of kilometers (Tamworth) from their families…. In other words, to make room in our cities for those more important.

      • Baruch Spinoza

        Thanks Sarah Hanson-Young, can we get another colossal sook in parliament over the welfare of foreigners while completely fucking over your own constituents ?

        I voted Green in the upper house for two decades. Mind blowing – I nor anyone I know – all inner city hipster Melbournians who were responsible for the formation of the Greens will be voting for them again.

        Just outrageous.

  4. Absolutely hilarious. Especially after the Coalition raised the spousal visa cost by 800%.

    Really makes expats think twice about coming back to Australia.

  5. Hill Billy 55MEMBER

    As this is about permanent residents and their relations, there is not one vote in this for the LNP. Is the budget that fragile that it needs a $100 Mil hit to produce the magic surplus in the out years? Or is it about Reusa’s relations with the famously good looking property tycoons?

    • Mining BoganMEMBER

      Perhaps they want to overload the health system to such a level that it reaches critical failure. Then they can come out and say it’s busted and we’re chucking it out.

      Bye bye health system. Welcome medical treatment for rich folk only. It’s the only logical explanation.

  6. no thought to the separation of Australian just the propagandised notion that only Asians & Induans have any true sense of family or ‘elder care’
    Australians are too busy swallowing the voluntary euthanasia line to protest as their country of birth sold out beneath their feet.

    • I also love the way the Coalition expects young Australians priced-out of Sydney and Melbourne to move to the regions (away from their parents). But they are happy for migrants to bring their elderly parents into Sydney and Melbourne.

      • Yes UE that is exactly what I meant although my head is too scrambled with rage at the corruption & bulls$$t in Australian politics & media to articulate my point so succinctly. I come off as bitter & racist … in my heart I’m not either of these things however Political Correct has silenced recent generations of Oz educated citizens.. too scared to say boo to climate change, immigration, housing, LGBT (& i or whatever?) transgender, refugees, etc. All taboo subjects unless towing party line.

      • naturaltrust

        The problem can be solved, Leith (Dog Boxes) von Olsenen, with a ZERO net population target. Some elderly can then come in under that plan without increasing the population.

        Families should be able to support their elderly.

        The problem is the majority of younger immigrants should not have been allowed into the country to begin with. Again, we need a ZERO population growth target.

      • Young australians dont vote liberal so f#@K em.
        Rich new australians might….

      • naturaltrust

        I am not attacking you, Leith (Dog Boxes) van Onselen.

        You have earned the affectionate title of ‘Dog Boxes’ due to your biased support and promotions of Universal Land Tax and high rise small ‘Dog Box’ apartments for all Australians.

        Equally, your friend Cameron (Dog Boxes) Murray also holds that title as Cameron ‘Dog Boxes’ Murray due to his equally biased support and promotions of a Universal Land Tax.

        Further, the cute and affectionate title “Dog Box” can now legitimately be applied to every protagonist of Universal Land Tax.

        In a recent article you came out Leith…For around two years you had been refusing to acknowledge that Universal Land Tax is a deliberate economic tactic to reduce land use and put people into Dog Box high rise apartments. Then you made the admission!

        Congratulations on your honesty, Leith!

        • This is your first and last warning, NT. If you hijack another post with unrelated land tax stuff, then I will ban you. Stick to the topic at hand. Leave your land tax whining to posts about land tax.

      • naturaltrust

        You asked the question and I answered it, Leith (Dog Boxes) van Onselen.

        Your bully tactics are showing.

  7. Like allowing foreign primary school children’s guardians to buy houses here, it’s just another way we’re being punished. It would be nice to know what the crime was.

    • The crime was being dumb enough to vote these knaves, scoundrels and charlatans into power.

      And we deserve everything we get….

    • Baruch Spinoza

      In 18 months my primary school has gone from 2 Asian kids to 40…its absolutely staggering in a school with 300 kids.

      The school is raking in $5k per student.

      Sickening to watch the “smiles” on the principals face.

  8. Is the 457 / student visa into citizenship constituency really so large now that both majors have to start pandering to them? I guess it is.

      • People who said this in the past were described as racist.

        Are they still racist when they are proven right?

        Looks like ON gets a few more voters after news of this disseminates.

    • Nope. 28% of AUS is foreign born. And a lot of the foreign born hate excessive immigration.

      Immigrants who voted for Brexit:

      https://youtu.be/Fec8Ya-MhXk

      An older wiser gentleman thinking of his kids future and voted for Brexit. Young African/Caribbean female is like “it would be hypocritical for me to vote for Brexit”.

      Yeah, a smoker telling kids not to take up smoking is “hypocritical”. So what.

      • Baruch Spinoza

        90% of Chinese vote conservative.

        Say what you want but Liberal, National, Greens and Labor ALL SUPPORT mass migration.

        Its so completely fucking fucked.

        .

    • The bigger implication is that someone in government doesn’t think that what was on offer was an enticing enough deal to convince people to keep coming here, maybe because for reasons that are hard to fathom, wage aren’t rising.
      Otherwise, why would you need to offer an off the books parental health payment to get them to keep coming?

      • Yeah that’s what I’m thinking. Once you strip the spleen-venting away (as completely justified as it is) and start to work on how this has been justified by the apparatchiks…

      • The kind of intriguing part is why is it so important to keep those people coming? What do they think is going to fall over if their undeclared NOM target gets missed by 10k, or if business finds that it can’t get away with paying blow-ins less than half the local going rate?

        Actually, reading it again, I wonder if it is to stop people who have got here, and obtained PR, moving back home when their folks get on too much, which would eat away at NOM over time as the proportion of O/S born increased, and which I think has been seen to some degree in the US with respect to Mexican migrants.

      • drsmithyMEMBER

        The kind of intriguing part is why is it so important to keep those people coming?

        Must keep GDP increasing.

    • Ronin8317MEMBER

      It’s not the Chinese voting block : most of them don’t vote because China doesn’t allow for dual citizenship, and getting your inheritance from China as a foreign citizen can be a nightmare.

  9. I actually do not want immigrants to work here. I want the work/job.

    Can rant against them clogging up the roads, hospitals, trains though.

    Leith, I think you should leave out the bit about them not working. Otherwise you will sound like Peter Dutton: “if refugees get a job, it is bad and if refugees do not get a job, it is also bad”.

  10. Even StevenMEMBER

    This is seriously bad policy.

    The two big parties (usually at loggerheads) in agreement on perhaps the most obviously bad policy I’ve seen. You can’t make this stuff up.

    • This policy is terrible but not as bad as printing 457 visas like mad. Not as bad as dumbing down Aussie degrees. Not as bad as mass immigration from the 3rd world where a great chunk of the population smokes and where cousin marriage is accepted (resulting in disabled kids).

      Not to mention the wages these 3rd world immigrants are working here for ($10/hour).

    • DodgydamoMEMBER

      Don’t be fooled by arguing between the two heads of the same (two headed) LibLab beast

      • I think she’s very satisfied with ‘I told you so’. Good for her. She doesn’t owe anyone jack.

      • Probably right Owen and since she’s only in it to dip her snout further into the trough, it simply makes her the same as the rest of them. They all say I told you so at some stage……generally as they walk out the door with a golden parachute and never whilst they’re in a position to effect change.

  11. This is so nursing homes and private hospitals can get more money?

    You lot keep on thinking, I do too, that this country is going to become smart somewhere down the track. I don’t think it will.

    At least this Autumn weather is nice.

    • Yep, Australia will never be the smart plucky country it used to be about 15 years ago ever again, ever, I mean fucking real estate agents are celebrities and role models now…. totally gone to the dogs with no chance of coming back, we can’t afford to build the roads and hospitals, it’s all gone

  12. Ronin8317MEMBER

    This is really bad policy. They also need to factor the increase in divorce rate, because there are substantial pressures on the marriage when you live with in-laws. >_<

    Not everyone age gracefully like Prince Phillips. When the parent starts to suffer from dementia, the pressure on the public system would be immense. The cost to get a place for a private provider is 400K : that should be how much the bond needs to be.

    • Nailed it. My Chinese Australian friends, or Aussies who married Chinese are all under significant family stress due to having to bring the olds over. It’s a nightmare really. And the oldies usually are not happy here.

  13. TailorTrashMEMBER

    Those old folk from China and India have put their money in Strayan houses (by helping their kids bid up the prices ) ….now time to get their return ……come and retire to them and get full healthcare …………………..what irony when the boomers who sold out their children’s homes are now croweded out of hospitals …….well done Straya ….nice bit if nation and society building there ……..

    • Gotta post those pics on wechat and make the people who count (those still back home) green with envy!

  14. I don’t know why everyone seems so surprised by this obviously bad policy. What did you expect from Turnbull and co? They are all complicit and captured, they no longer give a rats arse over what is best for Australia.

    They will continue to serve the vested interests that clearly control them and they won’t stop until our country slips into the third world. At least then immigration should slow, I mean what would be the point of coming here then.

  15. reusachtigeMEMBER

    I love this idea because it will help keep the housing boom cranking upwards! It’s what is needed. I just hope these imports don’t ruin the relations parties. I’m into some weird shit but not that weird! Can’t knock it until I try it I suppose…

    • Well I think you’ve probably nailed the real reason for this visa, so that’s a start.

      Lets face it. If Chodley Wontook’s of this world illegaly buy established houses in Australia for their children to live and study in, it’s only fair we sell em a $10k visa to help them escape embezzlement and corruption charges in their mother country.

  16. As said before on this blog I’m the spouse of a 457 worker, have been here nearly 9 years, son went to private school-small fortune, rented- large fortune, paid tax- large fortune, private health care- small fortune, new car, daily living, holiday here. I also spend my time working volunteering in the arts as your government keep cutting. We have had a great time in this beautiful country. We never had the intention of staying. We are going home in 6 weeks for good. Back to a country where my son will get free 3rd level education (European fees, which are minimum) Get a job when he leaves, and get this, be able to afford his own home! The thing is he has done his growing up here, his best friends are here, his social life etc. at some point he may want to come back and good luck to him. He is my only child and I would want to be with him. I will fight all the way to stay in my own country and hope he stays too. I just wonder if any of you have ever moved from this large island at the arse end of the world. And yes; jokes aside I am just passing through!!!! Unlike the rest of you, lodged and festering. Large islands, small minds.

    • where is this paradise you speak of that we can all escape this shithole for, I’d love to leave

    • Yep, emigrated to Sweden for a while. Loved it and wish I could have stayed but the job market wasn’t so flash in 2004. I took ANY work I could get. But the number one problem I found was trying to house ones self.

    • 9 years passing through and being treated equally like any other Australian; at least show some gratitude. You obviously was here for the money and now complaining that your son will loose his friends because you are leaving. You brought that onto him so blame yourself.

      • Being treat equally. You are kidding aren’t you! Did you not read; we were renting, and my son will not LOSE (not loose) his friends he will be able to Skype them on virgin media with a speed of 320 Mbps. Happy out.

      • Not sure what you’re smoking… Most of the population rents and we pay the same taxes that you payed. You even get medicare. Anyways, good luck with it all.

    • If like me you have lived abroad for many years and made intermittent trips back you can almost catalogue the destruction of Australia as a civil society. One issue after another has been set up to divide us and create hatred in both directions, all issues of course radiating out from the vested financial interests of those in power, mostly from the right wing nut jobs who have developed an extreme religion based on neo liberalism. In turn the victims have developed their hatred against these policies and also the benificiaries, for eg immirants who are bought in in such numbers to undermine their wages and job security, or being kept outof housing so that landlord’s can get rich. Anyone who now apears to be getting a good deal whether real or imagined will be a target for hatred.
      Because of these policies, both my wife and I have both become long term victims from both the 457 visa cult in IT jobs and in housing problems. However we focus our hatred on our business leaders and their pet politicians, and are more nich in our hatred of the beneficiaries, like housing speculators and employer practices wherby once an ethnic group has power it becomes a closed shop to the rest of us. I can understand where your ideas for small mindedness comes from and it is becomming a bigger problem as we regress into the rigt wing nut jobs nirvana.
      The new incentives for parental visas is for cash up front, buy som votes and push money towards private health insurance, and the fees can be massive.

    • Gill, in all earnesty, my heart goes out to your son – the real victim of this scenario. Your departure otherwise sounds like a win-win, for you and for this nation. He will never know a life as great as he enjoyed growing up with his blissfully myopic mates on this blissfully myopic continent. I hope one day he forgives you for cutting off his roots and transplanting him in an old, miserable continent like Euro-poor, but I wouldn’t bet on it. Thanks for coming, thanks even more for leaving.

  17. I believe the late Kerry Packer said it best “Fuck off, and fuck off now”. Or maybe that was just on the 12th man tapes?

  18. d672c804897d

    “We want to help families reunite and spend time together, while ensuring that we do so in a way that does not burden Australia’s healthcare system.”

    Look, I proposed some short while ago (8-9 April weekend) that Dutton deserved to have his head flushed down a dunny, but a point of order was called by Ermington who declared the practice uncouth and I deferred at that time to his expertise in the area.

    I am at a loss now to respond to this f#cking insanity by any other means. The only way not to burden Australia’s healthcare system is to build new hospitals for migrant parents, funded exclusively by them and I can tell you it is going to take a lot more than a $10,000 visa fee (or at least the net $50 that will be left over after administration costs are deducted) and a bare bones loophole ridden junk private health policy.

    I do not mind treating any individual patient and do not give a stuff about ethnic background. Actually many overseas born patients are courteous and grateful which can be a refreshing change from your average tattooed anglo meth head. The problem is the big picture. While I am sorting out polite and courteous Mrs Elderly Non Resident for 90 minutes, the waiting room is full and Mr AngloTatts Meth Head is threatening to throw a chair at the triage nurse and reminding every one he is Hep C positive and the median wait time is blowing out to way over 6 hours. You may not believe it, but the single biggest source of stress for any ED Doctor is how long people have to wait for treatment and how inadequate you feel not being able to speed things up for everyone. This is not going to help.

    • Mrs Elderly Non Resident and Mr AngloTatts MethHead – Michael Musto would be proud.

    • blacktwin997MEMBER

      Your frustration is quite understandable and hospital funding model is sound. That said i’m sure we’d all be polite and courteous too if some other nation’s taxpayers covered our lifetime medical expenses in exchange for a one-off fee of $10K.

  19. eric.meijer66

    Curiously reactionary comments on this topic. Disappointing really. Surely a multicultural society based on migration can allow new migrants to have an extended family? Especially if the parents are supported/insured?

    • ‘Curiously’ reactionary? ‘Disappointing’? I would say venomously reactionary, and understandably so. Melting pots don’t work if you overfill them; the excess content simply overflows the vessel and suffocates the flames beneath.

      This melting pot is full, and the embers are cooling.

  20. This is awesome for the family groups that stick together and pool resources collaboratively – in this case its free childcare for the grand-kids, and a spare pair of hands in the kitchen to prepare healthy and delicious meals inexpensively. Together, this will help the young uns work more overtime and get on the property ladder sooner. As a side benefit Grandpa – a lifelong smoker can extend his life by virtue of living in a better environment and receiving healthcare at a time when he needs it most.

  21. It strikes me as something you’d do to raise the age of the population, so you could then say “look we’re aging too fast, we need to import more young people because we’re rapidly getting old”

    • I hadn’t thought of that, marked64, but good thinking – what a wonderful way to grow the population at even greater breakneck speed.

  22. So, how much of the $10,000 that the federal government collects per visa will be passed to the states to provide the health care for the visa holders?

  23. SchillersMEMBER

    Looks like the 15,000 long stay elderly parent visas are in addition to the current “family” stream of Australia’s permanent migration program, currently set at 190,000 per annum. Apparently 57,400 annual “family” migrants is not enough. We need to bring in a further 15,000 aged folk from overseas every year.
    Question without notice to the Prime Minister: exactly how is this policy “putting Australians first” ?

  24. So much for trying to fight the problem of an ageing population!
    Oh, I get it. Fight ageing with more ageing.
    Just confirms what I always thought; Australia becoming another Asian country.
    These Labour/ Liberal governments have been running this country into the ground for far too long.