Murdoch still backing Abbott

By Leith van Onselen

In the lead-up to the September 2013 Federal Election, Rupert Murdoch’s tabloids ran a feverish campaign backing Tony Abbott as Prime Minister:

ScreenHunter_9151 Sep. 02 10.35

With all of the stuff-ups and gaffes that have occurred since becoming Prime Minister, one would have though that Mr Murdoch might be having second thoughts. Not so, with Murdoch taking to the Twittersphere to slam The Greens:

ScreenHunter_9218 Sep. 04 09.44

And continue backing Tony Abbott:

ScreenHunter_9219 Sep. 04 09.45

Mr Murdoch’s attacking of the Greens makes little sense. Since Senator Richard Di Natale took over as leader, the Greens have been a small beacon of light in an otherwise dysfunctional parliament.

It is the Greens that supported the Government’s Aged Pension reforms, whilst also advocating for fairer superannuation concessions.

It is the Greens that have implemented as policy reform to Australia’s inefficient and inequitable housing tax concessions.

And it is the Greens that almost single handedly opposed the Government’s draconian and expensive metadata scheme.

Perhaps it is the last point where Mr Murdoch owes Tony Abbott the biggest debt. As an owner of Foxtel, he stands to benefit from the crackdown on internet piracy via metadata and the Government’s draconian Copyright Amendment (Online Infringement) Bill 2015.

[email protected]

Unconventional Economist

Leith van Onselen is Chief Economist at the MB Fund and MB Super. Leith has previously worked at the Australian Treasury, Victorian Treasury and Goldman Sachs.

Comments

  1. Excellent! This will help Abbot stay in to wear the coming storm, and also further demonstrates that News Corp is totally out of touch, and nothing but a tool for manipulating political outcomes.

    It’s a best case scenario for the dis crediting of Rupert and Tony’s broken world view.

  2. Two dinosaurs.

    The NRL has put feelers out for Foxtel alternatives. Without the NRL, payTV is unviable in Australia.

    It’s rather fitting these two are sitting the same side of the room.

  3. Yep, follow the money. Murdoch is a climate denier because he is a major shareholder in a fossil fuel company, and he backs Abbort because of this and his pro-Foxtel moves.

    PS love the re-use of the Abbort-Murdoch reach-around tryst snap 😉

    Wish we had a shot of Tony Blair bonking his ex-wife, lol

  4. One of the things I learnt yesterday from that Halall article and the selective publishing of its details by selected medial was just how much media controls the info which reaches the public.
    An advantage of sites like this and social media in general, is that unbiased reporting from social media is getting a run, indeed some are saying the traditional media are being bypassed for feeds direct to social media to get news out. (news corporations are being directly bypassed)
    Uncle Rupert is losing money hand over fist over here with his media, investments, and Fox sport may have just bitten much more that it can chew with the deal for live sport.
    Murdoch will be well aware of the threat to the monopoly of media bias social media poses and the last thing he needs for his commercial empire is the “vandals” of Labour in the castle. I’m sure he is a very worried man.

  5. Murdoch is also backing Brooks to tackle the BBC although she is stained in UK public life. As loyal and stubborn as Abbott.

  6. “Mr Murdoch’s attacking of the Greens makes little sense. ”

    From my experience most critics of the Greens haven’t even read their policies. They just regurgitate Murdoch and friends lines.

    • Also, it makes plenty of sense given who Murdoch is. In fact, if he did NOT attack the Greens, I’d be very concerned

      • He bumped into Richard di Natale in the street. Blood started running from his nose, and he loudly declared GGGGNNNNTTTHHHHHRRRGLGLGLGLGLGL, before vomiting up 4 litres of bile and falling in front of a passing bus.

        His last words were ‘the greens did this to me’.

      • He bumped into Richard di Natale in the street. Blood started running from his nose, and he loudly declared GGGGNNNNTTTHHHHHRRRGLGLGLGLGLGL, before vomiting up 4 litres of bile and falling in front of a passing bus.

        His last words were ‘the greens did this to me’.

        There’s way too much direct cause and effect there for a rich42 post.

    • It’s also frustrating to read lines like “since Di Natale took over” when Greens policies have been pretty consistent for many years.

      • “It’s also frustrating to read lines like “since Di Natale took over” when Greens policies have been pretty consistent for many years.”

        Yep, but I think the likes of Di Natale and Scott Ludlum are better at communicating to a broader audience.

  7. ErmingtonPlumbing

    How many elections, would the “Liberal” party have won, without the coalition with the Nationals?

    As more and more Australians realise they are actually bog standard members of the working class and never were middle-class to begin with, a movement to the left by the electorate seems inevitable, in spite of the right wing economic propaganda, that we all get barraged eith every day and that moved the ALP to the right decades ago.

    As a life long labour voter, im voting Greens next election as the ALP seems just as captured as the LNP are by the coporate plutocracy.

    Im wondering if down the track, we might see a coalition of Labor and the Greens?

    • At some point it is inevitable.
      Perhaps not the “peas in a pod” relationship of the Libs and Nats. Perhaps more of a formal agreement to support legislation and confidence motions, as the Greens and ALP had under Gillard.

      The Greens still have a bit of way to go in their evolution into a “major” party.
      Over the next two or three electoral cycles, I expect them to solidify a base of inner city
      seats in the Melb/Syd/Bris triangle, with maybe some “sea change / tree change” seats as well if they are lucky.

      When they have base of a dozen or so Lower House seats, perhaps it will be time to talk about sharing Executive power with Labor i.e. positions in Cabinet.

    • Im wondering if down the track, we might see a coalition of Labor and the Greens?

      I hope not.

      Our system will do its best work when there are multiple independent parties.

      Also, there’s plenty that Labor and Greens disagree on. Even if we wound Labor back twenty years, they’d probably still disagree on enough to not be a “coalition”.

  8. FiftiesFibroShack

    An aging conservative ideologue backing Abbott is hardly surprising. Conservative ideologues and the aged are Tone’s strongest supporters. We’ve never really had a push for good policy from Murdoch, just a constant ideological agenda that occasionally aligns with good policy, although, these alignments are becoming increasingly rare.

    Rupe’s twitter feed sure is a hoot, though.

  9. Rupert isn’t as powerful as he once was.
    But don’t write off a rush to an election post canning irrespective of the result.
    It is possible.

    • A lot depends on whether they have been drinking their own CoolAid and they don’t see a recession brewing.

      I still think August next year is the most likely date.

  10. Rupert is probably the most influential Australian in the world today. You can accuse Rupert of many but cowardice is not of them. We need more Rupert Murdochs. People prepared to go into world and take some risks. Not just stay in Australia looking to the nanny state to look after them from cradle to grave.
    The problem is that too many Australians have gotten rich without too much effort. They just had to conform by getting some crappy job and most importantly, buying a home, maybe two, three, four homes.
    So if Rupert is dinkum about reforming Australia then he should be leading the charge to get rid of negative gearing, tax concessions on superannuation and all the rest of the middle class welfare. His should also be leading the charge in reducing corporate welfare as well as bail outs/ins. Maybe he can fight for fair trade based upon a gold standard so we would not have all these unbalances in the world. At last count we have IOUs of about $11 trillion in central bank reserves meaning the trades have not been completed.

    • But he is not Australian – gave away his citizenship for power/influence in USA.

      It is good to have a non-Australian pulling the strings on his puppets in Australia through his media dominance.

      • I think Rupert’s influence is still strong but declining to due to the internet. We can hear so many different voices these days. This website is a prime example. H&H, Unconventional Economist are doing a great job in educating people about the Australian economy. They just give it to you straight with no waffle. Whereas the MSM tend to waffle.
        Charts dont lie which is why we dont see too many of them in the MSM.

    • “Not just stay in Australia looking to the nanny state to look after them from cradle to grave.”

      We may not need to if the economic policies Murdoch advocated so hard for hadn’t helped gut and distort our economy..

      • Rupert’s entrepreurship is extraordinary. However, his hypocrisy is just as extraodinary as well as his greed for power and influence. “Just like our late Fuhrer”, so said CNN founder Ted Turner in a doco about Rupert.
        We all agree that Australia is a mess, that it needs change but Tony Abbott has ruled that out. So Rupert’s endorsement of him is odd to say the least. As MB says it is probably due to something relating to his commercial interests which makes him a hypocrite.

  11. Abbot and his government are a complete joke- no one can possibly argue that they are doing a good job. The sad thing about this joke of a country is that the only thing worse than this government, is the alternative. Either way, we are totally screwed.

  12. Companies whose current Chair or CEO have overseen the corruption of public officials by their employees, should not be awarded Australian broadcast licences or Australian Govt contracts.

  13. I think Murdch is anchoring.

    He’s seen his political investment fall in value, and rather than cutting his loses and making a new investment, has decided to double down in the hopes of making good on his original Abbott bet.

    Anything to keep Tony in the job long enough to one and for all kill of the lie that the Liberals have any economic nouse is good by me. Then maybe the political process will have to move on to a clash of policies, not meaningless slogans

    Another nod to clarke and dawe

    https://youtu.be/xnqRWQxhUjc

    Love the concept of outsourcing voting near the end 🙂

  14. “the Greens have been a small beacon of light” ? I respect a lot of your views but you have to be kidding. Heard of Sarah Hanson- Young, Adam Bandt, Lee Rhiannon, Larissa Waters. This motley collection of mentally challenged midgets probably represent about 1% of the population yet prevent the Government from correcting the mess left by the last mob. The Government may not be the best we have ever had, but by God they leave the last rabble in the dust. Do people really want that shyster Shorten in the top job? Really? All the things the soft left on this site wish for would surely come true. More Muslim immigration, less jobs, more control by the CFMEU, softer on drugs and crime etc. The world will never be perfect but cereberally challenged union thugs like Shorten allied with the Greens? You are being sarcastic, surely?

    • “This motley collection of mentally challenged midgets probably represent about 1% of the population yet prevent the Government from correcting the mess left by the last mob.”

      If only there was some way of officially testing the support for a political party. We could run one every few years and maybe call it an election? A party with 1% support surely wouldn’t pick up enough seats to be a problem for the government.

      • If it’s the Australian Senate it would be, dope. Adam Bandt isn’t a problem, just the other 1%’s. Dope.

    • ErmingtonPlumbing

      Me thinks we have a paid spruiker her in djhadley,

      Its all a little, too, identical to the 2GB Alan Jones/ Ray Hadley shtick
      [email protected] the union digs are gona sound a bit old, in a decade or so, when the union virtually wont exist outside of the public service.
      In the mean time, lackeys will be lackeys, trying to impress and gain favour with their Plutocrat masters.

      • You are a dope. If my name was Smith, would I be related to Adam? Argue the facts, dope, not my name. What’s yours? Courageous coward? Hiding behind a keyboard in a western democracy but wanting change. Try North Korea, they’re still trying socialism, sort of. And if you want to argue, use English, not pidgin.

  15. You might as well dig up Sir Keith Murdoch, give him a twitter account, and ask for his opinion. It would be just as relevant. The Nats actually get half the vote of the Greens (4.3% vs 8.6% of the total vote at last Fed election), but no one seems to really question the extent to which the Nats are representative of the Australian population, or bang on about how they are holding back the country in the way the Greens (who will probably take 1 in 10 votes at the next election) are expected to answer for. Given Rupert’s world view, he could just as easily make the argument that the Nats are extremists (at least, prior to Barnaby’s neutering and change in medication). Regardless, in no universe is a half baked fool like Abbott the best option.

    • ErmingtonPlumbing

      Maybe Rupert knows an enormous, global, economic crash is about to occur and backs Abbott, knowing he will lose and leave the lesser, pro-coporate party holding the reins when the shit hits the fan, diverting blame away from the true villains, coporate plutocracy.

      Probably the same reason that, that complete tool Donald Trump is getting so much fox air time.

      This is Rupert still in controll. Still pulling the strings.