Victoria records 445 COVID cases, 2 deaths

Victoria has recorded another 445 locally acquired COVID cases and two deaths:

Most are mystery cases. Of the local cases, only 129 are linked to known cases and outbreaks.

The next chart plots Victoria’s daily cases:

Daily cases continue to run well ahead of NSW’s at the same point in their outbreak:

Victoria’s active cases have risen to 3799:

And they are running ahead of NSW’s active cases at the same point in time:

Yesterday, Victorian Health Minister Martin Foley described the current outbreak as a “pandemic of the young and the unvaccinated”. He noted that 87% of the state’s active cases are people under the age of 50, while 585 are less than 19 years old.

Some 157 people are in hospital with COVID-19, and Foley says 89% of them have not been vaccinated.

Unconventional Economist
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Comments

  1. Some 157 people are in hospital with COVID-19, and Foley says 89% of them have not been vaccinated.

    By the same logic he could say:
    “Some 157 people are in hospital with COVID-19, and Foley says 89% of them have not been blck.”

    it is the simple nature that when majority of plebs are not treated for covid are going to be the majority in every metric and statistic. Like in Eesrael where majority are jabbed majority of hospitalisation will be from the jabbed pool. Now that begs another question…

    now UE will delete this comment in 3, 2, 1….

  2. Australian government seems to be suffering from “man with a hammer syndrome”.

    The public is being hammered with powerful vaccine messaging. If only the vaccines were as powerful as the marketing.

    • Until they’ve both peaked you can show whichever you one want is growing slower or faster by changing the start dates – particularly as in both cases speed of growth has fluctuated.

      For example, 7 day average cases rose 50% per week from 4th August to 18th in NSW (Victoria had the same 7 day average NSW had on 11th of August last Saturday, 11th of September), but in the week to 25th of August the 7 day average rose 66% and then rose by only 38% in the week to 1st September.

      Choose which weeks you want to compare and come up with any answer you want until Victoria exceeds NSW’s peak or peaks before it does so.

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