Weekly COVID-19 (Coronavirus) statistics and analysis flipbook

See our Coronavirus data Dashboard for individual country data.

COVID-19 statistics and cases around the World

     

 

Europe

 

 

United States

 

Death Rates

COVID19 Highest Death Rates per capita

More COVID-19 Statistics and Analysis

See our latest blog posts or podcasts here. See our Coronavirus data Dashboard for individual country data

Data sources

This is a list of some of the main data sources we use:

https://www.worldometers.info/coronavirus/ Probably the best source of the latest COVID-19 statistics

https://medium.com/@tomaspueyo/coronavirus-the-hammer-and-the-dance-be9337092b56 Tomas Pueyo has written a number of very good summaries of the strategies to overcome coronavirus

https://www.capitaleconomics.com/the-economic-effects-of-the-coronavirus/ Good source of fast-moving China economic stats.

https://bnonews.com/index.php/2020/02/the-latest-coronavirus-cases/ If you want to be bombarded with every breaking news story, this is the place

https://ncov.dxy.cn/ncovh5/view/pneumonia  Faster than worldometers for Chinese data, but slower on rest of the world data. I don’t think China cases matter anymore.

https://www.who.int/emergencies/diseases/novel-coronavirus-2019/situation-reports I’m less enamoured of the WHO data now than I was at the start of the crisis. They are providing less information now than they were at the start of the crisis, and it sometimes contradicts country-level data.

https://gisanddata.maps.arcgis.com/apps/opsdashboard/index.html#/bda7594740fd40299423467b48e9ecf6 The prettiest pictures, but one of the slower sites to update. I don’t find the charts that useful.

https://www.youtube.com/user/MEDCRAMvideos has a daily youtube wrap-up

https://www.youtube.com/user/ChrisMartensondotcom has a daily youtube wrap-up

https://www.ecdc.europa.eu/en/covid-19/surveillance/weekly-surveillance-report

https://covidtracking.com/data/download/national-history.csv

https://ourworldindata.org/coronavirus-testing#tests-per-confirmed-case

 


  Denise O’Sullivan is a Data Scientist at the Macrobusiness Fund, which is powered by Nucleus Wealth.

 

 

The information on this blog contains general information and does not take into account your personal objectives, financial situation or needs. Past performance is not an indication of future performance. Nucleus Wealth Management is a Corporate Authorised Representative of Nucleus Advice Pty Ltd – AFSL 515796.

Comments

    • NoodlesRomanovMEMBER

      That or the ‘what if that doesn’t work, work is the plan then?’ brigade. The public gets confused enough with 3 dot points, if the government talked about contingency for everything then jeesus

          • It is just another version of the same policy as always, kick the can down the road and make it someone else’s problem after they’ve left.
            The reason we have so few cases has very little to do with their management and much more to do with geography.
            Funnily enough the non government of antarctica has been exceptional at keeping covid out.

          • Arthur Schopenhauer

            There has been an enormous effort by the Australian Government to stop Covid getting to any Aussie base in Antarctica. E – n – o – r – m – o – u – s.

          • FUDINTHENUDMEMBER

            Well the virus is still spreading there. So yeh, ipso facto, humans ain’t socially distancing. It’s a virus, it ain’t magic, if you’re swapping air (or surfaces) with another mammal who’s infectious, your likely to get it.

          • Humans living in a city are virtually unable to distance enough to not spread a virus. A mask is nowhere near enough to provide 100% prevention of infection.

        • Big numbers aren’t so scary when you put them in context. Has nothing to do with masks and social distancing (that is the least of what is actually being done).

          • You should be scared about the UK and Ireland. There is no way Europe or the USA will be able to handle B117 with a live with it mentality. This variant is significantly more spreadable, is airborne and has an r0 somewhere between .4 and .7 higher than the current best variant (The Milan or 2nd Wuhan variant).

            Epidemiologists around the world are already sounding the alarm, 2021 could very well be significantly harder than 2020. Leave the hubris at the door. Comments from sum are it would be harder to stop 10 cases of the new variant than a 1,000 of the old.

            Hopefully our leaky border can keep it out until the next to useless AstraZeneca vaccine is dribbled out.

    • Shades of MessinaMEMBER

      Well looking at those UK and Ireland graphs – in hindsight it worked perfectly well over Summer. Now, not so much….

      Weird how those graphs are all so different to each other as well. Classification differences ?.

  1. RobotSenseiMEMBER

    Anecdata from physician mate of mine in SoCal: 20 bed ICU, currently 60 patients ventilated; he estimates an extra 20% in cases and the whole thing comes crashing down – people are just left to their own devices as they are out of BiPap and vapotherm, don’t have any more coming, and have physically run out of space to put people.

    Sounds like a dumpster fire inside a trainwreck inside a plane crash inside a Trump rally.

  2. So, the problem seems to be that if a country doesn’t do much genome testing ( UK 10%….US 0.3% ) then in the background cases you leave running the new variants increasingly takeover and that low level in cases you thought you could live with end up crippling your country ( are you listening NSW )

    If we manage to train the virus to hide with our botched vaccine roll outs then next year we will probably be using saliva tests much more than we do now as they give more information. Last couple of days though the US and UK vaccine programs are starting to improve. Still need to give that second shot at the right time because the difference between life and death is decided in the first two weeks antibody production by the body

    https://twitter.com/VirusesImmunity/status/1348289299469500417

  3. A friend of mine in Colorado has been in lockdown since March. That’s how long its been since her kid has seen another child. No going out, no mingling with other people, no school. Has it made any difference? Colorado has a Covid death rate just slightly below Sweden, so the answer is no.

    • I agree, Japan, and Korea have also not locked down and have very low rates of death per million. Whether alot of people die in a country is mostly due to the demographics, economics and how they deal with their elderly. Lockdowns have no observable effect.

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