ANU: Coalition’s visa reforms won’t shift migrants to regions

MB has frequently ridiculed the push by the Morrison Government towards decentralisation, noting that this is a pipe dream based on the settlement pattern of new migrants, which have overwhelmingly chosen to flood the major cities:

Well, the situation is even worse than presented above with new ANU research of settlement patterns showing that around 70% of migrants that move to Australia’s regions will subsequently move to the major cities within five years:

Professor James Raymer, who led a team of Australian National University (ANU) researchers to collect and refine almost 40 years of data, said migrants in a regional or remote area have a “very low chance” of staying in that area, and this pattern has been “very consistent over time”.

“Most will leave within a five-year period, over half, if not 70 per cent, will leave, and if they’re going to stay in Australia they’re going to go to one of the big cities, probably Sydney or Melbourne,” he said.

“What we actually see in the data, the chances of them leaving remote and regional areas has been increasing for a lot of the newer migrant groups”…

The ANU data is the most comprehensive picture of regional migration ever collected in Australia.

Across 47 regions and 19 nationality groups, the project tracks who has moved where every year back to 1981.

It finds that regions in Queensland, Western Australia and the Northern Territory have the lowest rates of retention of migrants.

Yet more evidence that the Coalition’s “migrants-to-the-bush” policy is nothing but a smokescreen and that Sydney and Melbourne will continue to be crush-loaded under the bipartisan ‘Big Australia’ mass immigration policy.

Unconventional Economist
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Comments

  1. Of course they will head to the cities.

    What fool would do otherwise once they understand that we have a banking system that has been deregulated so that credit creation is overwhelming directed to asset price speculation rather than productive new investment.

    The banking system is spraying that hundreds of billions of dollars of credit creation at asset price speculation and by definition the safest way of doing that is to spray it at the assets most likely to rise and hold their value, Its like perpetual motion only it really exists.

    This means that the best bet for any immigrant is to get themselves and their families, aunties, grandparents, cousins etc under the best sprays of bank credit creation as quickly as they can and that means Sydney and Melbourne.

    https://theglass-pyramid.com/2017/08/17/population-pressures-why-isnt-decentralisation-working-in-australia/

  2. Maybe you are missing part of the picture, those who just want to get out of the big cities and seek the rural idyll because the cities are getting too congested?

    • You don’t need to import people to find those willing to do that. Half of Western Sydney’s locally born population would be happy to leave tomorrow if they could.

      Shame about the near total lack of career opportunities in the regions though, and the redneck locals who think you’re out to steal “their” jobs. Nice place to live if your highest aspiration is to claim welfare, perhaps.

      • “.. Half of Western Sydney’s locally born population…”

        Locally born people in Western Sydney?

        • exactly. The bogans & skippy’s have largely gone.
          Just a few old battlers left in their fibros and when their now adult kids drive out to visit, the cars locked in the driveway.

          the entire suburb full of bearded jihadi, Chinese, Vietnamese, south East Asians, Indians, Nepalese & Bangla or African gangs.
          No English ever.
          Rubbish everywhere.

          Sydney western suburbs is now a vast fetid heaving non assimilated set of migrant slums.
          Many are TR migrants or Tourist visitors working & living illegally.
          Or get the train.
          Play spot the Aussie on the Leppington line..
          maybe 10 people of say 800 or 900 on the train.