Australia’s skilled migrant visa system rorted

For well over a decade, Australia’s business lobby has argued that a strong intake of skilled migrants is required to overcome perceived chronic shortages in the labour market.

However, the data has never supported this assertion.

First, the Productivity Commission’s (PC) 2016 Migrant Intake into Australia report showed that while the majority (two-thirds) of Australia’s permanent migrant intake is comprised of the ‘skilled’ stream, roughly half of this category is in fact made up of secondary family members of the primary skilled migrant. Accordingly, the overwhelming majority of Australia’s immigration program is actually unskilled (note: the below PC chart does not include the 16,000 strong unskilled humanitarian program):

…within the skill stream, about half of the visas granted were for ‘secondary applicants’ — partners (who may or may not be skilled) and dependent children… Therefore, while the skill stream has increased relative to the family stream, family immigrants from the skill and family stream still make up about 70 per cent of the Migration Programme (figure 2.8)…

Primary applicants tend to have a better fiscal outcome than secondary applicants — the current system does not consider the age or skills of secondary applicants as part of the criteria for granting permanent skill visas…

Second, according to the federal government’s own data, skills shortages across both managers and professionals are running near recessionary levels:

This is important because three-quarters of ‘skilled’ permanent and temporary visas issued in 2017-18 were for managers and professionals, meaning that Australia’s skilled visa system is adding further capacity to an already heavily oversupplied labour market.

To highlight this farce, the top five occupations granted skilled permanent visas in 2017-18 were:

  • Accountants (3505)
  • Software Engineer (3112)
  • Registered Nurses (1561)
  • Developer Programmer (1487)
  • Cook (1257)

None of these professions was deemed to be in shortage over the four years to 2017, according to the Department of Jobs and Small Business.

Third, the pay levels of so-called ‘skilled’ migrants is ridiculously low, and is unambiguously contributing to Australia’s historically low wage growth.

According to the Department of Home Affairs, the median full-time salary of skilled visa holders 18 months after being granted the visa was $72,000 in 2016, which was below the population average of $72,900 (which comprises both skilled and unskilled workers).

In a similar vein, the salary floor for Temporary Skill Shortage (TSS) visas has been frozen at the ludicrously low level of $53,900 since 2013-14. Accordingly, TSS visa holders earned a median income of only $59,436 in 2016, which is $13,464 below the median full-time Australian salary of $72,900 in 2016.

Finally, the latest Characteristics of Recent Migrants survey from the ABS showed that skilled migrants (as well as all classifications of migrants) experienced higher rates of unemployment in 2016 than the Australian born population:

With this data in mind, SBS News published an interesting case study highlighting how Australia’s ‘skilled’ visa system is being systemically rorted:

When 37-year-old Karnvir Singh was offered a full-time job as a chef at a Gold Coast Indian restaurant he couldn’t believe his luck…

The father-of-one migrated from Punjab in India to Australia in 2007 to study hospitality management.

“Cooking is my passion. Sometimes I cook at home because I can’t stop myself,” he said.

He married in 2014 and he and his wife, who also moved to Australia, had a daughter three years ago.

But after working at the restaurant for more than three years, his life was turned upside down when his employer requested that he work without pay. He said his boss initially promised him it would only be for a few weeks.

“When I asked him to pay me, he started blackmailing me… I had my [visa] application with the Immigration Department from his restaurant, he said if I am going to ask him more and more about wages he is going to withdraw my [sponsorship] nomination,” he said.

Mr Singh was working on a 457 visa and his employer promised to sponsor him for permanent residency under the Employer Nomination Scheme (subclass 186 visa). But it didn’t happen…

Carina Garland, assistant secretary of the Victorian Trades Hall Council said those on temporary visas are particularly vulnerable to exploitation, especially when their employer is their sponsor.

“There’s a whole range of cases where employers use the power they have in Australia over those on temporary work visas to steal their wages,” she said.

The Fair Work Ombudsman told SBS News in a statement that in 2017-18 they assisted 2,158 workers in workplace disputes involving a visa holder. That equates to 20 per cent of the total number of disputes dealt with…

In Mr Singh’s case, he says he is deeply embarrassed the boss he trusted was from his own country…

Ms Garland said it wasn’t uncommon for exploitation to come from members of the same migrant community…

Mr Singh’s visa application was cancelled by his former employer when he left, but he is now on a bridging visa while he challenges the visa decision in the courts, separately to his Fair Work claim against his former employer.

This has all the hallmarks of a shambolic ‘skilled’ visa system, namely:

  1. A migrant employed on a TSS visa in a profession that isn’t actually ‘skilled’ (i.e. cook);
  2. Brought wife to Australia;
  3. Exploited by a migrant employer;
  4. Refuses to go home now that his TSS visa has been revoked and his profession is no longer deemed in shortage; and
  5. Stays on a bridging visa while he challenges the Australian Government in the courts in a bid to gain permanent residency.

Any objective assessment of Australia’s ‘skilled’ immigration program would conclude that it is a giant farce that is failing to meet its original intent, is depressing wages, crush-loading the cities, and is damaging overall amenity and liveability. It needs fundamental reform.

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Comments

  1. “Ms Garland said it wasn’t uncommon for exploitation to come from members of the same migrant community…”

    Bringing in the best and brightest…

    This country was more honest at the start when it was founded on the labour of petty thieves and criminals Now it’s run by thieves and criminals for thieves and criminals.

  2. Proves that there is a sucker born every minute. The same thing has been happening since 2006 or earlier:

    A man trafficked from India under a sham 457 visa arrangement was held in conditions “akin to slavery” for 16 months

    Dulo Ram lived, ate and slept in the kitchen of Mand’s Indian Restaurant in Eastwood, NSW, working 12 hours a day, seven days a week, enslaved by the restaurant’s owner Divye Trivedi.

    The shocking thing that hits home is that this is happening under our noses in suburban Sydney. Slavery is alive and well in 21st-century Australia.

    Sure is. And the fake Greens are busy ranting against a non-existent coal mine instead of, um, slavery in Sydney.

    Manjit Singh arrived in Australia on a 457 temporary visa in February 2006 with hopes of becoming a chef in Australia but was instead forced to work 8am to midnight 7 days a week at Darlinghurst’s North Indian Flavour restaurant in appalling conditions.

    a chef at the very modest Vivek International Hotel and it’s there that he met Gurjit Singh, who would go on to sponsor Manjit’s Australian 457 visa application.

    Gurjit Singh, said the applicant would be paid $43,000 a year.

    he had to sleep in a storeroom and was locked in overnight.

    A cook in a nondescript hotel in a nondescript town thinks he will be paid $43k/year? He was paid absolutely nothing and was literally kept under lock and key! There is an endless supply of gullible fools.

    Put a massive $1000/week tax on every 457 visa. That would allow genuinely high wage staff to keep coming in while keeping out the cheap third world labour that is willing to work here for $10/hour.

    • ErmingtonPlumbingMEMBER

      An Indian restaurant in Eastwood?
      Are you sure?

      Every shop up there is Chinese on one side of the railway tracks and Korean on the other.
      I was surprised to see an Indian couple walking down the street on the Korean side when going into Eastwood Plumbers CoOp the other day,….they didn’t look like they were slaves though.

      • There is one, but it’s not actually in Eastwood itself, it’s a bit further out on Balaclava Road. It opens at 5pm this afternoon if you’re in the mood for a Jalfrezi.

      • I do not live in NSW but a quick search reveals that the restaurant was at 255 Rowe St, Eastwood, NSW.

        Another one:

        AJ’s Indian Restaurant
        58A Balaclava Rd, Eastwood NSW 2122

        You are correct. That is the only Indian restaurant remaining in Eastwood!

    • this is the same demographic who make up 97% of the 127 matters currently on appeal at the AAT from the VET regulator….it really makes you think.

  3. Hanno Son of Bomilcar

    the entire classification of which professions are in ‘shortage’ or not is itself probably farcical, since i would assume it is based on employer reporting, and employers are full of sh1t. when employers claim they can’t find somebody to fill a particular role it isn’t because they can’t find ===anyone===, it’s because they can’t find anybody with 5 years or whatever of existing experience, a perfect resume, etc.

  4. Hanno Son of Bomilcar

    the entire classification of which professions are in ‘shortage’ or not is itself probably farcical, since i would assume it is based on employer reporting, and employers are full of sh1t. when employers claim they can’t find somebody to fill a particular role it isn’t because they can’t find ===anyone===, it’s because they can’t find anybody with 5 years or whatever of existing experience, a perfect resume, etc. australian employers are uniquely lazy fvckwits who refuse to hire anybody who they may have to spend time training for more than five seconds, hence the constant cries of ‘shortage’ even after throwing thousands of submitted applications in the trash can.

  5. Same as my profession. I know many employers who scream….we can’t get anyone! What they mean is they can’t get anyone for the amount they want to offer

  6. Professor DemographyMEMBER

    Australian business leaders are trying to maintain living standards for themselves and competitiveness via labour importation and wage reductions.

    The government is helping ensure we can’t improve this via the cheaper energy and land and mineral wealth the country could work with.

    That is the sad frustrating thing to watch.

    • It’s a matter of adopting Lazy Economics 101.

      Our politiicans are too short-term focused to do anything that requires effort and proper consideration.

  7. McPaddyMEMBER

    What is so pernicious here is that an entire ecosystem is created that is unprofitable unless the exploitation and rorting continues. The minute you try to right the wrong, people start bleating about jerbs and the body blow to the economy, blah blah blah. WTF happened to this country?

    • What country??

      Haven’t you been reading Stewie’s posts? There is no nation. Just a collection of self-serving communities, collocated on one continent.

    • Strange Economics

      Totally Correct – the business model for so many places is now dependent on underpaid workers. With the high rents from the property bubble how many shops and restaurants can compete with full wages with the exploiting businesses.
      And at the skilled end its the same –
      Including in IT (e.g. Banks) where local new graduates are unemployed, while foreign graduates of Australian untversities on 2 year work visas and 10 year experienced 457s are willing to work essentially as interns for less than a salary with a free Permanent Residency..

    • If we know exploition is endemic in the hospitality sector, particularly businesses run by migrants in exchange for a visa, surely a review of the granting of business visas needs to be examined?

    • I think Woolworths is next in line for a class action suit, bought on by staff not given shifts or hired in the first instance, because they aren’t of a particularly ethn1c background.

      • What’s your issue with Woolies and demographics?

        As an English-speaking immigrant, I’ve had to cross a couple Woolies off my list because of the customer-service-incompetent (due to being non-English-speaking) self-serve checkout workers they employ. Presumably this is their version of Coles “local neighbourhood friendly products” — “local neighbourhood friendly staff” who don’t alienate locals who haven’t learnt English yet … nevermind about the actual English speakers who eat various East Asian cuisines.only a couple times a month. I had trouble at one Woolies with two different self-serve clerks of Asian backgrounds, who felt that the way I used the scanner made me a “mark” for being a shoplifter and watched me carefully and started running my items through the scanner for me, even when I tried to push the away and say no thanks, when really i was just an officeworker with an efficient system for scanning my goods resulting in the least strain for my mobility impairment. Crossed that one off. At another Woolies, I had a similar issue with another woman of a similar background. All, unable to functionally communicate with me in English, but all oddly suspicious of me. (Curiously, Aussies and those of other backgrounds simply aren’t suspicious of me at the self-serve, leading me to believe that there’s some cultural misunderstanding at play, on their part.) All the ONLY staff available at the time at their self-serve area, so I didn’t have an option to deal with an English speaker.

        Don’t have time for that. I stick to the Woolies in the ever-decreasing number of primarily-English-speaking suburbs now.

      • Stores that have shift, assistant store or store managers, that are from the subcontinent, you’ll notice the frontline staff are therefore mostly from the subcontinent. Staff that aren’t helpful, that point instead of talking, and just plain ‘cold’ and unfriendly.

        It use to be local kids worked there, whilst at school or uni or TAFE, but now, it’s new arrivals helping other new arrivals. Sad.

  8. And how much money did Mr Singh sent off to pay for his original study, or to support family members?

    Any claimed ‘economic benefits’ of having these migrants here, is surely offset by remittances and infrastructure costs.

    Let’s factor in all the money being drained from the Australian economy via remittances.

    Scrap the bulk of occupations on the skilled visa list.

    Scrap business visas for setting up or buying food outlets that we don’t need, that encourage wage theft.

  9. Add child into the mix, paying probably nothing in tax – overall, Mr Singh has been a drain on the Australian system.

    And for what, so we have another price-sensitive ‘consumer’ sending out remittances, and so that an ethn1c restuarant (to which, we have enough already), can exploit their staff?

  10. Gold Coast Indian restaurant case-study: completely unacceptable and I trust this will be addressed.

    That said, unpopular opinion: Australia needs lower salaries and skilled migrants. This needs to start with lower living costs – cheap energy, cheap water, cheap food etc. I find food here to be expensive and mediocre quality.

    I am a Software Engineer and I can tell you that I have to earn 10x what my overseas colleagues earn. This leaves me vulnerable and makes me feel uneasy. From a business perspective we can make 10 mistakes overseas for 1 mistake here. Australia buys iPhones – it doesn’t make them…it doesn’t develop them. If it doesn’t invest in the profession then it will lose out longer term.

    Atlassian here is (rightfully) viewed as a success – but is no Github (now Microsoft) and it certainly is no SpaceX or Tesla.

    Also not popular: there are professions that maintain value (existing standards such as chefs, plumbers etc.) and there are professions that add new value and capability (drug development, automation systems etc.). As a fresh migrant, I don’t see so much of the latter…and at a personal level it feels lonely here compared to, say, London, Singapore and the like.

    So whilst some may bash the government for encouraging professions “not in need” – they are right imo to at least try to entice folks over here…because those seeds may later create a viable industry. New Zealand imo has done a good job there with respect to encouraging technology development.

    Thoughts of one.

    • Most of Atlassian’s Sydney staff is populated by 457’s. They appear to prefer Vietnamese slaves as they do computer science from primary school.

    • Hi Ollie. Excellent to hear the perspective of a skilled migrant. I’m one myself (an Aussie in HKG).

      Here are my responses to your thoughts/questions:
      • Rather than import people, many of whom are not paid as if they have very much in the way of special skills (so I’m assuming they don’t really have very special skills), would it not be better to invest in our own people via training? That’s how we should be “investing in the profession”. Sadly our magnificent captains of industry have fallen into the trap of believing that’s not necessary and the corrupted govt allows them to get away with it.
      • Agreed, there is precious little of “the latter” in Australia. The majority have convinced themselves that this is not necessary. A massive mistake that will have (and is already having) absolutely dire consequences.
      • If you are looking for people who have an innovative and adventurous mindset, I’m not surprised you feel lonely. These people are generally hounded out of Oz, or silenced, one way or another.

      • Thanks McPaddy for sharing your thoughts – I certainly appreciate it.

        > Rather than import people, many of whom are not paid as if they have very much in the way of special skills (so I’m assuming they don’t really have very special skills), would it not be better to invest in our own people via training? That’s how we should be “investing in the profession”. Sadly our magnificent captains of industry have fallen into the trap of believing that’s not necessary and the corrupted govt allows them to get away with it.

        A few comments:
        1) so essentially what I do can be done anywhere where folks have a computer – I have to compete against a global talent pool. That is hard. They are cheap…they are getting very good….there are many folks out there.
        2) It takes ~10-15 years to become proficient in my profession…Australia investing now will take a long time to acquire the human capability…and there is a good chance that new value will come from other areas in ten years (e.g. blockchain, machine learning etc.)
        3) It is too expensive here to compete globally in software development – sure if we were the leaders then we could set the price…but Australia isn’t…and higher quality talent can be acquired overseas at lower cost. At a personal level, software engineers love the environment here…but I have known business managers to liken the move as “career suicide”. I hope that some of us can make a difference.

        Education is one thing… but it is the overall efficiency of the operation here. We desperately need lower costs to ease pressure on the demand for higher salaries. In terms of supermarkets, I wouldn’t normally use Aldi _but_ I try to spend money there because I think they are good for the Australian economy – you can get organic produce and low costs…and that trend must continue if for the simple fact that others are (automating processes and gaining efficiencies).

      • • “what I do can be done anywhere where folks have a computer” – Then why would we give people a visa to do it from Australia? Why not just import the product?
        • “It takes ~10-15 years to become proficient in my profession…Australia investing now will take a long time to acquire the human capability” Then we should exit the market or invest for what will result 10-15 years from now. A mistake in the past is not a reason for inaction now.
        • “It is too expensive here to compete globally in software development” It’s expensive in Japan and Germany too. But they manage. The Nordics are not cheap, but they manage to create a lot of great stuff. Why should Oz be incapable? Perhaps software isn’t possible (it’s so frictionless), but then why would we do it onshore?

        Lowering costs. We all agree, just as long as it’s not the cost of ourselves….

      • > • “what I do can be done anywhere where folks have a computer” – Then why would we give people a visa to do it from Australia? Why not just import the product?
        Sure, so I would liken the ability to write software to reading and writing. Essential for many new technologies and something Australia certainly needs to develop further. Clearly, however, there is no point in training Computer Scientists for them to just move overseas because there is no local industry to keep them. Automated mining, solar, farming etc. all seem like strong industries for development. We can certainly buy from overseas…but clearly the population are concerned for their jobs and wages..so they need to add value.
        
> • “It takes ~10-15 years to become proficient in my profession…Australia investing now will take a long time to acquire the human capability” Then we should exit the market or invest for what will result 10-15 years from now. A mistake in the past is not a reason for inaction now.
        Agreed…although it is hard to say what will be particularly valuable in 10 years…we can guess…but it has been *many* intelligent people that have come up with *some* useful software…and there isn’t always a correlation with investment. Bitcoin, for instance, is fundamentally changing things (first time we cannot rewrite the history books etc.)…appeared to come out of nowhere…and was a gift to the world.
        
> • “It is too expensive here to compete globally in software development” It’s expensive in Japan and Germany too. But they manage. The Nordics are not cheap, but they manage to create a lot of great stuff. Why should Oz be incapable? Perhaps software isn’t possible (it’s so frictionless), but then why would we do it onshore?
        Sure, I was thinking that given the limited capability there should be incentives for software developers to reside here….and without a critical mass it is very difficult. One or two developers are unlikely to be taking on Google any time soon…but we have to start somewhere (rather than giving up).
        With respect to competing – a population that can compete globally know they are adding value. Long term subsidies / protectionism ultimately give the illusion of success at the expense of us all. With respect to the countries you mention – sure I can think of software from those countries _but_ they are still largely insignificant compared to the US. I would say that Israel has a surprising capability and, of course, has the likes of Intel there with an ongoing operation.

        So I don’t mean to sound like I am in disagreement – it is just that the topic is nuanced. Wages don’t necessarily correlate well to value esp. in new technologies….and chefs, medical doctors etc. don’t necessarily correlate well with the value of research scientists.

        As I stand here – I’ll give it a go…if an ongoing operation here is viable…I am taxed fairly (given that I have to compete globally) then I would certainly like to explore that and possibly create opportunity for others. If not then I would guess that I might end up in the US…and I suspect that I am not alone.

    • Ollie, as Australia stands at the moment, we don’t need people to come here.

      You are simply a new consumer to grow GDP, and in part, helping to suppres wages for employers. You’re also helping to keep property prices up.

      I’m sorry to burst your bubble, but we were right before you and the rest came along.

      • Hi Chase, I take your point. In my case, I am completely self sufficient. I set up a company here…I pay tax…I don’t work for anyone (locally)…I only spend locally…and my family are Australian. I don’t have any strong desires to buy property because I see it as overvalued.
        My hope is Tesla will work to reduce fuel costs and that Australia can better align its skillsets with future technologies. When working at a local university, I sigh sometimes at the attitude of some students…often coming from very privileged backgrounds (e.g. mining money)…believing they have the right to earn high wages. They might be a little more humble if I introduced them to the folks I have supported in developing countries.

    • In 1960, Australia had less people than Holland. Now, Australia has 8 million more people than Holland!

      How does every other country get by without being 29% foreign born?

      We do not need more people – especially if they are working for illegal wages.

      Singapore? The population of Singapore did not grow from 2016 to 2017.

      There was a slight decline in foreign employment, of around 10,000 people, in the 12-month period ending this June.

      Singapore gave citizenship to 22,076 people last year

      https://www.straitstimes.com/singapore/total-population-564m-with-number-of-citizens-up-1-to-347m

      Australia imports 160,000 people per year!

  11. What’s the difference between Australia’s economy and a lady of the night?
    The former sells herself to all and sundry while believing she’s chaste and honourable. The latter knows what she is. At least there’s a sense of integrity in that knowledge.

  12. It’s all rorted.

    Every visa category is totally corrupted.

    The third world unskilled migrant influx pouring in,thru every visa category, churning, extending, the foreign criminal syndicates and onshore black market rorting& racketeering every loophole.

    That’s why we need an Australian people’s initiated Royal Commission into our totally broken border controls and visa system.

    To take control of our visa system & migrant intake.

    Strip that from any government of the day and place it in the hands of a people’s representative authority.

    -/-

    Let’s face reality.

    We allowed in 1.9 million migrant PR in the last decade.
    They were ubiquitously third world & unskilled.
    Asset poor. Non assimilating.
    78% as unskilled and highly dependent. Their 2nd and even 3rd generation offspring continue (on average) to remain poor, unskilled, low income and the epi-centre of crime, welfare and health care fraud.

    The Australian ‘experiment’ in mass immigration resulted in importation of third world needy who exploited our borders, visas & intake settings.

    Who continue in successive generations as an underclass and will be a welfare & health care burden for many decades.
    (Not a bigoted statement ‘drsmithy’ – face up tofacts),

    The average GDP per capita of the average unskilled PR is $56,300 v $85,600 per Australian. (ABS).
    The migrant PR form a $83 billion sub economy as part of Australia’s $AUD 2.1 trillion overall GDP.
    They degrade our overall Australian GDP per Capita by 2.8% Negative.

    ➡️ Our PR intake filters are all wrong & highly corrupted.

    But that’s not the most serious issue.

    On top of the PR mistake – we then have allowed in another 2.561 million non residents Temporary visa holders. (March 2019). Details below.

    That is equal to 16 years of the current PR third intake (160,000 annually) as an even worse burden.

    The average GDP per Capita of a TR is even lower than a PR. $43,700 is the Treasury Estimate or only 51% of the Australian born citizen average GDP.

    The 2.561 million TR form a $144 billion GDP sub economy but reduce Australian GDP per Capita by 4.1% Negative.

    TR / SCV by category.

    1,866,089 are as a non Resident TR, the vast majority are third world unskilled & at least 1.4 million work & live illegally.

    Plus another
    695,760 NZ SCZ with 278,304 of those as non NZ born third world unskilled.

    Total 2,561,849.

    Source: VisaSure & DHA quarterly tables.

    Visa category, the 2018 number, the 2019 number & yearly growth rate.

    🔹Overstayers permanent stay
    2018: 63,000
    2019:66,150 +5%
    Negative GDP per Capita

    🔹Visitor long stay, repeat stay many working illegally.
    2018: 395,000
    2019: 414,750 + 6%
    Negative GDP per Capita

    🔹Bridging/protection, 5 year plus stay as they exploit the appeals process with full work rights.
    2018: 195,000
    2019: 211,600 +7%
    Negative GDP per Capita

    Foreign students & partners – note the actual total of all foreign students in Australia is now 712,070 across a number of visa categories. International student and post graduate add to 653,000, 59,000 are ‘partner visas’ & the rest as special or scholarships as below.

    🔹International Student primary, 4 year plus stay, and many up to 9 years as they churn courses, COE & visa categories.
    2018: 526,000
    2019: 573,520 +7.5%
    Negative GDP per Capita

    🔹Post Graduate, another 3-5 year stay plus full work rights as they exploit this loophole, very long stay
    2018: 65,000
    2019: 69,550 +7%
    Negative GDP per Capita

    🔹Temp partner ‘foreign student’ very long stay – 4 to 9 years
    2018: 53,000
    2019: 62,000 +16%
    Negative GDP per Capita

    🔹Temp partner other
    2018: 38,000
    2019: 43,700 +11%
    Negative GDP per Capita

    🔹Working holiday, very long stay
    2018: 148,000
    2019: 155,400 + 5%
    90% are in Sydney & Melbourne, only doing the 3 month ‘farmer or labor ring bribe rural work’ in a further extension.
    Negative GDP per Capita

    🔹Skilled Regional very long stay
    2018: 20,000
    2019: 21,500 +7%
    Again heavily frauded, third world unskilled we have 20% youth unemployment in regional & rural areas.
    Negative GDP per Capita

    🔹Other Temporary Visas, long stay including scholarships & other rackets.
    2018: 70,000
    2019: 72,800 +4%
    Negative GDP per Capita

    🔹Employer Sponsored, very long stay
    2018: 152,000
    2019: 155,040 +2.4%
    Some close to an average GDP per Capita

    🔹Business Provisional, long stay
    2018: 28,000
    2019: 28,840
    Some close to an average GDP per Capita

    ➡️ The Total TR….
    2018: 1,762,000
    2019: 1,866,089 + 5.9%
    Overwhelming Negative GDP per Capita

    🔹Plus the NZ SCV
    2018: 655,000 of which 270,000 are non NZ born born third world unskilled entering via the NZ transit lounge.
    The genuine NZ born are going back.
    2019: 675,000 with an increasing ratio of non NZ born unskilled (and another 290,000 stacked up waiting for entry into Australia). 90% one way flow to enter NZ, get the passport stamp then enter Australia as permanent stay.
    Increasingly Negative GDP per Capita
    This SCV arrangement should only be for Australian and New Zealand born. Not for NZ to let in who they like – and then use Australia as their outlet and dumping ground of third world migrants who have been banned or exited from Australia & so then go via the NZ SCV racket to later enter Australia via this loophole.

    All up
    2018: 2,431,000 non resident permanent on a very long or permanent stay visa alibi.

    2019: 2,561,849 non resident, as above & mostly third world adult unskilled who are working illegally onshore. +5.3%.
    131,849 extra TR in 1 year, getting close to the entire PR intake number!

    Concentration.
    89% + concentration or 2,280,046 in Sydney & Melbourne.

    🔻1.27 million in Sydney (pop 5.2 million)
    1 in 4 people is an unskilled third world TR

    🔻1.01 million in Melbourne (pop 5 million)
    1 in 6 people is an unskilled third world TR

    More unskilled migrant guestworkers than GaddafiZ

    The only bigots here in this forum are those that would continue to defend this social & economic lunacy.

    ➡️ It’s time the Australian people acted and petitioned the Governor General for a Royal Commission on our broken borders and corrupted visa system.

    And demand that the policy and intake settings are stripped from the government and placed in the hands of a people’s representative authority.
    Neither political party in government can be trusted.
    That’s why the control needs to be taken away from them.

    • Jumping jack flash

      Good analysis but sadly nothing can be done. Apart from the fact that the last RC worked so well to change the status quo, constantly cheaper labour is now required to support constantly increasing debt. If push came to shove it would be quickly revealed that the banks actually want this, so this is what we get.

      Any spare capacity in disposable income that could support higher prices to support higher wages is already being used to pay for debt (and gouged costs of living – also due to the debt!)

      One obvious solution is to wait for the next interest rate cut, but they’re pretty much at their limit, and besides, an interest rate cut of 0.25% is simply not going to be able to give you any useful amount of debt.

      So its much more effective with regards to acquisition of debt to steal 40K from some migrant’s wage, add it to your own, and take that to the bank to exchange it for debt.

    • “On top of the PR mistake–we then have allowed in another 2.561 million non residents Temporary visa holders. (March 2019)”
      Are these really temporary visa, meaning that once a certain time period is up, it’s bye bye? Or is this where the fun starts and they have the privilege of applying for PR?

      Because in reality, if Sydney had approx. 1 million less people, it’d be pretty sweet.

      • They churn the Tourist & visitor visa
        Indians & Chinese ‘love you long time’ long & repeat stay – 8.8 million tourist visitors, 440,000 or 5% or more only here to live & work illegally (ABF 2015 Parliamentary report) or ‘health tourism’ aka matches Medicare card fraud & also PBS drugs to resell in Asia or India.
        To visit & live with ‘family or friends’, few are genuine tourists staying in hotels (declining) or doing ‘tourist activities. Nope – out in Granville, using the borrowed opal concession card, the Medical centre on the borrowed Medicare card, working in the restaurant or brothels or factories, or the old Indian mothers & her sisters in at home childcare, cooks & cleaners or ‘helping’ the family..
        Or running off to the Appeals Tribunal for a ‘protection visa – Muslim etc on a tourist visa – suddenly discovers Christianity or some excuse to stay – 5 years full work rights.

        Then we have the foreign students & ‘partners’
        Most living & working illegally in visa breach.
        (75% states the Sydney Uni & UTS studies SMH)
        Often a 9 year stay on an original 4 year nonsense course. Progression to a high income professional vocation? 3.9%, 96% fail that. Exposing the farce it is.

        The working holiday- but 90% in Sydney or Melbourne with the farmers & labour rings taking bribes for a 3 month make work nonsense job to extend the stay.

        The 270,000 non NZ born SCV : Winston Peters “NZ only sells 2 things – milk powder to the Chinese and passport stamps to the third world to get into Australia”
        The spousal rackets.
        The business visa rackets.
        The regional visa rackets.
        The skilled visa & partner rackets (article).
        The DFAT ‘scholarship’ & overseas visa rackets.
        Or just overstay – 65,000 of those as well.

        It’s basically pseudo permanent residency.

        2.561 million TR / SCV
        90% in 2 cities.
        1.3 million plus or 1 in 4 in Sydney a TR/SCV
        1 million plus or 1 in 5 in Melbourne a TR/SCV
        Wonder why both cities feel like vast third world migrant slums? Because they are. Literally.

        2.561 million TR plus the 440k tourist & visitor visa holders onshore working & living illegally (5% of the 8.8 million tourist visitors)
        => round numbers is 3 million.

        That’s got to be the largest per head of pop migrant guestworker influx of any oecd country.

        👉🏻 Completely broken borders & visa control.

  13. Jumping jack flash

    Restaurant owners are people too, and people need more debt.

    Restaurants are a dime a dozen. Competition is fierce. If the prices are too high, go next door where they’re cheaper.
    Basically, nobody has any money to spend on restaurants because its all being used to pay for debt, and therefore restaurant prices can’t rise. Prices set incomes. Restaurant owners’ incomes can’t rise… oh, the humanity!

    To add insult to injury, cost of living ratchets up, gouged because of the debt the providers of these essential living costs need.
    Everyone needs debt.
    Debt is required.
    You need debt to buy all the things you can’t afford with wages alone..

    To obtain more debt requires more wages.

    Suddenly there is an impasse.. A massive, massive problem: How to get more debt, when wages can’t rise?

    Fortunately there are migrant workers. Lots of migrant workers. Stealing their wages is pretty easy, after all, they’re just happy to be here. If they don’t like it they can take their wife and daughter back to bustling, vibrant, India.

    Like restaurants, migrant workers are a dime a dozen. Literally. If the first migrant worker objects to having their wages stolen, just show them the door and wave the next one in until you find one who doesn’t mind.

    Then go to the bank and obtain more debt with your increased wages!
    So. Easy.

    • But why are we giving out business visas for Dime-a-Dozen restaurants? For the cash injection into the economy, where profits are sent out anyway, to pay back offshore lenders and support family’s overseas; to steal wages from workers and not pay proper entitlements; to prop up employment demands for new arrivals who aren’t the great consumers government wants them to be?

      • Jumping jack flash

        No, their only purpose is to be used to steal wages from so business owners can obtain more debt.

        these imported workers don’t consume, and they can’t obtain debt – they’re not paid enough. Consumption isn’t their purpose. It can’t be.