The Turnbull’s population credibility collapses under Dick Smith barrage

By Leith van Onselen

Dick Smith is a national treasure. Yesterday he used his own money to fund an ad in Australia’s major newspapers challenging Lucy Turnbull – the chief commissioner of the Greater Sydney Commission (GSC) – on mass immigration, and asking her what her eventual plans are for the population of Sydney – querying whether it could be 16 or even 100 million.

Below is the ad:

ScreenHunter_16811 Dec. 16 09.49 ScreenHunter_16812 Dec. 16 09.49

The response from Lucy Turnbull’s office was pathetic. From The Australian:

The Australian sought comment from Ms Turnbull, through the Greater Sydney Commission. Commission chief executive Sarah Hill responded that Sydney’s rate of population growth was the “hallmark of all successful cities around the world”, and the group based its planning on a middle range of growth forecast, prepared by the state’s demographers.

“More than half of this growth is through natural increase,” Ms Hill said. “Our responsibility is to plan for this to make our city more liveable, sustainable and productive, rather than to debate the facts.”

So, “more than half of this growth is from natural increase”, according to the GSC? Not according to the Australian Bureau of Statistics (ABS). As shown in the below charts, net overseas migration (NOM) into NSW (read Sydney) accounted for 67% of population growth in financial year 2016, and has done so on average over the past 30-plus years:

ScreenHunter_16805 Dec. 16 07.52 ScreenHunter_16806 Dec. 16 07.52

However, the above charts significantly understate the true impacts of immigration on Sydney’s population growth because “natural increase” captures the children of migrants. That is, NOM brings with it an immediate direct boost to population as well as a subsequent boost as new migrant arrivals have children (subsequently classified as “natural increase”).

For this reason, the Productivity Commission this year estimated that Australia’s population would peak at 27 million by 2060 under zero NOM, versus 41 million under NOM of 200,000 – a difference in population of 14 million! This comes despite only 9 million of this population increase coming directly from NOM. The other 5 million comes from migrants and the decedents of migrants having children (see next chart).

ScreenHunter_15977 Nov. 09 07.44

These are “the facts”, which the GSC seems only too willing to ignore: it is primarily mass immigration that is causing Sydney’s infrastructure woes, as well as pressuring housing.

Clearly, the best way for Lucy Turnbull to make Sydney “more livable” is to tap her husband on the shoulder and convince him to rein-in Australia’s mass immigration program.

Because as far as high immigration goes, the buck stops with the federal government. If you are in local or state government then you don’t have much choice but to cope with continuing mass immigration putting an ever-increasing strain on already stretched infrastructure, housing and public services.

Lucy Turnbull is in a unique position to influence federal policy and effect change for the betterment of both Sydney and Australia. But like her husband she is a mouthpiece for the ‘growth lobby’ that gains from never-ending population expansion at the expense of the rest of us.

[email protected]

Unconventional Economist

Comments

  1. Mass immigration is fantastic when you’re the rep for Wentworth, where your only contact with the underclass is via delivery drivers and “the help”. You don’t even need to put up with the rabble on Saturday night anymore thanks to Baird!

    • @Tony real estate banker Malcolm Bligh Turnbull has 18 months at the most left of his tenure, as for his wife Lucy maybe Dick Smith and other powerful lobby groups can unseat her and shame her corporate identity to the benefit of the Australian people.

      • 18 months ! He’ll be lucky to have a job after Christmas as the economy tanks while the eagle soars.

      • Can’t understand why he’s going after Lucy and not Malcolm. Of course she’s only going to say she doesn’t set immigration policy only going on what demographers tell her etc.

  2. To be fair, Malcolm is not the only man to feel some apprehension when faced with a barrage of Dick.

  3. proofreadersMEMBER

    “But like her husband she is a mouthpiece for the ‘growth lobby’ that gains from never-ending population expansion at the expense of the rest of us.”

    Prima facie, Chairman Mal and CEO Lucy are conducting the orchestra and unforgivably, it knows only how to play one tune?

  4. Yeah, I saw this in the paper yesterday. I knew the “more than half” claim was a bald-faced lie. But, to be honest, I’m surprised that it’s as high as 33%. And yes, the first generation of immigrants definitely have more children than average (whether they are Catholic, Anglican, Hindu or Muslim).

    • But the response specifically stated they aren’t there to debate the facts. So top using facts, they don’t care or want to know.

      • “…………rather than to debate the facts.” Hmmmm.

        “It is difficult to get a man to understand something when his salary depends upon his not understanding it.”

        Upton Sinclair

        “Truth is mighty and must prevail, and if any body of men believe that they have discovered a valuable truth, it is not merely their privilege but their duty to disseminate that truth. If they realize, as they quickly must, that this spreading of truth can be done upon a large scale and effectively only by organized effort, they will make use of the press and the platform as the best means to give it wide circulation. Propaganda becomes vicious and reprehensive only when its authors consciously and deliberately disseminate what they know to be lies, or when they aim at effects which they know to be prejudicial to the common good.”

        Edward Bernays

  5. Dick a national treasure! The guy has the attention span of a pre schooler. Where does this hero worship come from?

    This sounds like more of the spruiking we heard in this place about the early Di Natale or the youngish Turnbull ………. and they’ve worked out so well as we got a good look at them. The dick might look good on the surface, but you might not like what’s underneath that carefully manicured public persona. Searching for a Messiah is prone to disappoint!

      • Sorry for butting in but when I see Spanish mangled it grates me. It is spelled “cojones” not “cajones”. The latter would be drawers. Other synonyms for the first word are, “pelotas” and “huevos”.

      • Fair enough Leith, I’ll answer your question. And the answer is NO. Satisfied?

        My point is that the guy has a confected nerdy persona and can hardly be considered a “serious” commentator on public policy. There are plenty of valid commentators without having the need to deify a market driven talking head. If you like him then I’m happy for you, but I thought this site was a venue for considered discussion and not a spruiker for the next runner for a cushy Senate seat.

        I recall in months past you were inviting your readers to sniff the undergarments of Turnbull, Di Natali and Bob Day until they became the latest festering piece of road kill on the political block. I for one would appreciate it if your worshipped in private thanks.

        BTW, why do you lower yourself to name calling? Is this a character flaw or are you just an edgy individual?

      • Malcom please list the actual names of other commentators on “The Drum” or “The Conversation” who put their money behind such notable causes which absolutely do not benefit Dick.

        Further you raise The Conversation – there is literally no media outlet with more vested interests and deeply, profoundly misguided intentions as that rag. Its commentary is so deluded – it is a echo chamber of the most captured far left social justice warrior zealots I have ever come across.

        The Conversation is truly embarrassing with the odd fantastic article. It really, truly does represent the absolute bench mark of why the centre and the left have abandoned their traditional roots for Trump, Brexit, Le Penn, Hanson etc, etc.

        If you can’t see the problem with The Conversation, and are here bagging the shit out of Dick without any real reasons or concrete examples then I suspect you are just as out of touch with the Zeitgeist as the rest of the self anointed demi-gods of the left who are quite literally embarrassingly out of touch and ill informed as they wallow, bathe and drink in Narcissus Pond.

      • Kurt, I hardly see the Conversation as lefty when the IPA apprentices like Daly and Grattan post to the site on a regular basis. If you mean the Profs from study centres are lefty then maybe your the one who should provide the proof? Articles on the Conversation are not always the be all. but they tend to be a somewhat more balanced view and let’s face it, Leith doesn’t hesitate to cross post from the Conversation when the mood takes him.
        And now you want me to name authors? Hey buddy, do some of your own leg work. I’ve provided the sources so maybe if you want to comment then you can do your own research and provide me with your conclusions. Unlike many readers in this place, I don’t take things on face value. But here’s a tip. Search the individual and if you come up with one negative piece of journalism then copy it here ….. but you will find none .. why? Because any negative stories get very quickly squashed with a phone call to the editors who are all bum buddies crafting this squeaky image. And try to get any comment …… any comment on him as an individual and you’ll see plenty of the philanthrophic fluff, but nothing negative. Almost too good to be true huh? Reminds me of the personality crafting of Bush and Obama, not to mention the parasite Reagan.

        Some people might be taken in by this public persona, but I remain sceptical.

        http://theconversation.com/the-ugly-story-of-dick-smith-from-float-to-failure-55625 Work backwards from there.

      • Malcolm,
        You may not appreciate that tax deductions are applicable to earnings. If you don’t make a taxable income, then there are no deductions allowed. If you have a problem with people getting a deduction for making donations to qualified organisations, take it up with the tax office.
        People don’t give away money to make money from deductions. You should try a short course in mathematics.

      • You’re a bit confused Pete, but I’ll pass on your views to my professional body. It will probably become a keynote address on light humour before we break for lunch. Keep up the good work.

      • @Malcolm. Having read part way down the comments I have one Question only:

        Why do you have a Hard on over Dick ?

      • Jumping jack flash

        As far as Dick’s capability for being a pollie goes, I’d rate him higher than Gerry Harvey.

    • “Where does this hero worship come from?”

      Gee, maybe because he sticks it to the establishment, puts his money where his mouth is, and is about the only rich guy in the country willing to challenge Australia’s population ponzi.

    • A long long time ago, when I was in Year 10, my work experience was at the Salvation Army office in Granville. One of the task given to me is to file the calling card for people who made significant donations (no computer systems back then). Going through the list of donors, one of the card shocked me with the amount : 100K. That was back in the late 80s, and 100K is enough to buy a house. The name of the donor? Dick Smith.
      I know there is a general ‘tall poppy syndrome’ with Australians, and many people disagree with him on aviation policies. Nevertheless, he genuinely cares about those less fortunate than him.

      • He’s just basically gifted the proceeds of the sale of his jet to a number of charities;

        The donations include:
        A donation to the Historical Aircraft Restoration Society ($125,000) For the completion of the restoration of the Southern Cross Replica aircraft.
        Royal Flying Doctor Service Canberra ($100,000) To improve the safety of night operations at remote aerodromes.
        Major donations to Institutions in Canberra and Sydney
        • The Australian War Memorial ($50,000)
        • National Museum of Australia ($50,000)
        • National Library of Australia ($50,000)
        • National Film and Sound Archive ($50,000)
        • Museum of Applied Arts and Sciences (Powerhouse Museum) ($50,000)
        These donations will be given with the suggestion that the money be allocated towards protecting, and possibly expanding, aviation related material.
        Arabunna Community South Australia ($25,000) To assist the Arabunna community to employ people in the aviation tourism industry. Perhaps constructing an airstrip near Marree Man so tourists can be taken to the site by the original landowners.
        Australian Museum Trust ($25,000) Towards scientific expeditions and furthering the Museum’s work.
        NSW Police Legacy ($20,000) Towards assisting Legacy’s air transport and other purposes.
        Angel Flight ($50,000) To assist country people to access medical treatment through flight.
        Careflight Westmead ($50,000) For helicopter rapid response and rescue services.
        Southern Region Westpac SLSA helicopter ($50,000) For helicopter rapid response and rescue services.
        Southcare Helicopter Fund ($20,000) For helicopter rapid response and rescue services to people in ACT and SE NSW.
        AMREF Flying Doctors Africa ($25,000) Flying Doctor Service in Kenya who service the whole of Africa with emergency and Primary Health Care.
        The Salvation Army ($20,000) Flying Padre and outback services to assist people in remote areas of Australia.
        Uniting Church in Australia Frontier Services ($10,000) Flying Padre and outback services to assist people in remote areas of Australia.
        State Library of NSW Foundation ($20,000) To assist with aviation related projects including the possible digitisation and rehousing of the Sir Hudson Fysh pictorial collection.
        Clamback and Hennessy Aviation ($20,000) For exemplary services to the aviation training industry while being opposed by formidable forces.
        Able Flight USA ($13,412 or $10,000 USD) To assist people with disabilities to learn to fly.
        FunFlight ($5,000) To inspire underprivileged children through the exhilaration of flight.
        QANTAS Founders Outback Museum Longreach ($5,000) To maintain the collection and inspire through aviation.
        Temora Aviation Museum ($5,000) To maintain the collection and inspire through aviation.
        Central Australian Aviation Museum Alice Springs ($5,000) To maintain the collection and inspire through aviation.
        Goolwa Air Park ($5,000) and four other small aerodromes ($5,000 each – total $25,000) To improve safety and participation levels at smaller aerodromes.
        Donations to Improve the Safety and Participation levels in Aviation
        • Aircraft Owners and Pilots Association ($30,000)
        • Recreational Aviation Australia ($30,000)
        • The Royal Federation of Aero Clubs of Australia ($20,000)
        • Australian Helicopter Industry Association ($20,000)
        • Australian Aviation Hall of Fame ($10,000)
        • Scouts Air Activity Centre Camden NSW ($10,000)
        • Scouts Air Activity Centre Moorabbin Victoria ($10,000)
        • Australian Business Aviation Association ($5,000)
        • Australian Ballooning Federation ($10,000)
        • Australian Women Pilots Association ($10,000)
        • Hang Gliding Federation of Australia ($10,000)
        • Sport Aircraft Association of Australia ($10,000)
        • Australian Air League Air Activities Centre Camden NSW ($5,000)
        Primary donation of $1 million to the Rotary Australia Benevolent Society Note: This amount was initially allocated to promoting and sponsoring an air race to commemorate the 100th anniversary of the Vickers Vimy flight from London to Australia by Ross and Keith Smith in 1919. Dick’s idea was the race should be commemorated 100 years later – this time with electrically powered aircraft.
        Unfortunately, after much toing and froing, Dick could not get any positive Government support for the project, so it was decided to reallocate the money. Following a proposal by Bob Cleland of the Rotary Club of Port Macquarie, this money was allocated to the Rotary Australia Benevolent Society. Bob is an old friend of Dick Smith from the Coal and Candle Rural Fire Brigade days.
        This donation has the potential to generate another $1 million, making a total of $2 million – similar to a previous donation to the Lions on 23 April 2013. The aim will be for individual Rotary Clubs to use this funding to in effect double any money raised for important social causes to help those in need.
        A major donation of $1 million to fund the Wilberforce Award. A number of years ago, Dick announced the Wilberforce Award, which is to go to a young person under the age of 30, who has the ability to show leadership in communicating an alternative to our population and consumption growth-obsessed economy.
        This amount will be set up with the plan to hopefully present the award within the next 12 to 15 months.
        Scouts Australia ($100,000) For the World Development Fund.
        Wild Care Tasmania ($100,000) Continue funding for 2017 – replacement of Lake Tahune Hut.
        Australian Indigenous Education Foundation ($120,000) To provide scholarships that enable Indigenous students to attend leading Australian schools and universities, as well as mentoring and career support.
        Wayside Chapel ($100,000) Care and support for the valuable work performed by the Wayside Centre.
        The Prince’s Charities Australia ($100,000) To further Prince Charles’ vision for a society to live in balance.
        Prosperity Without Growth ($100,000) Sustainability think tank initial funding.
        Exodus Foundation ($100,000) To continue with the important work under the direction of the incredible Bill Crews.
        UTS Health Psychology Unit ($50,000) Continue funding the vision of the late Dr Tony Kidman.
        Shepherd Centre for Deaf Children ($50,000) Specialising in teaching deaf children to speak.
        Mahboba’s Promise ($50,000) This is a further year’s sponsorship to take the funding to October 2017, after the Dick and Pip Smith Foundation funded the original construction of Panjshir Valley Hope House in Afghanistan.
        Muscular Dystrophy Association of NSW ($25,000) Working towards a world without Muscular Dystrophy.
        Clean up Australia Environment Fund ($20,000) Clean up and conserve our environment.
        Regg Dodd ($12,000) To further Reg’s work at Marree in communicating Aboriginal culture and knowledge to nonAboriginal people including school students.
        Pennicott Wilderness Journeys Nature Conservation Trust ($10,000) To further programs for the removal of feral species from remote islands.
        Ted Noffs Foundation ($10,000) To provide life management programs to equip youth at risk.

        Total donation: $4,170,412 so far – Christmas is the time for giving!

        http://www.pprune.org/pacific-general-aviation-questions/587903-dick-smith-donates-proceeds-his-cessna-cj3-citation-charity.html

      • Ronin – one of the truly necessary things for Dick to do if he ever gets into parliament will be to flush out the corrupt management group at Air Services Australia. If you think the RBA covered up bribery scandal at the Mint was something, wait till the lid gets taken off the cesspit at ASA

    • Dick Smith spends his own money on this, and other philanthropic causes. Amongst other things, he helped pay some ransom to get some Australian journalist out of some African country, his Dick Smith foods helps Australian farmers and manufacturers – all profits go to charity. And on the population Ponzi, his consistent, articulate exposure of the rentier classes foisting of high immigration on us to our detriment has provided a little more hope to us that see our children’s future going down the tube unless the TRUE effects of this mass population growth scheme are exposed. Dick Smith is a great Australian.

      • @Malcolm – even if some of his donations are tax deductable (I’m sure the ransom contribution wasn’t) he’s still paying 60% or so of the donation amounts that are tax deductible. That’s a lot of money out of his own pocket. I don’t understand why you’re so down on someone who seems to care about the future of Australia and puts his money where his mouth is. Seems like tall poppy syndrome against someone who has brought the population ponzi back into discussion, which can only be a good thing. Not to mention the array of other donations listed in another post by jimbo

      • I disagree completely with tax deductible donations. When some one donates from post tax earnings then they are a humanitarian. When someone makes a tax deductible donation they are reducing their taxation bill.

      • So when someone with a marginal rate of 40% gives $100 to the salvos (tax deductible) the $60 of their own money they’ve donated doesn’t count according to you. Do you not understand this basic fact or are you just trolling? (Not a rhetorical question.)

      • “When someone makes a tax deductible donation they are reducing their taxation bill”

        at the expense of a cost that is much greater than the tax saved. Doesn’t sound like a net saving to me.

      • Malcolm,

        Is that all you have to say? Tax deduction? Is that your argument? He sold DSE to Woolies a long time ago, if it’s relevant please be extremely blunt and point it out for me.

    • I think you’re right to be sceptical if recent history is to be used for newcomers to political leadership.
      In Dick’s case, for the moment, he has remained true to his narrative and brought it forward under his own power. He’s always supported sustainable population, and continues to support sustainable population. He’s no Messiah, but at least we can be reasonably sure his convictions aren’t bought, but true and honest.

      • Ok Simon but let’s test that shall we? Two weeks ago he came out in strident support of that lunatic Hanson’s policies. This week he’s telling people not to waste their vote on her. Does that sound consistent to you?

        • “Ok Simon but let’s test that shall we? Two weeks ago he came out in strident support of that lunatic Hanson’s policies. This week he’s telling people not to waste their vote on her. Does that sound consistent to you?”

          What planet are you on Malcolm? Dick only supported Hanson’s immigration intake level and her aviation policy. But he was at pains to state that he did not support her racial views on immigration or her other policies.

          Way to go (deliberately?) misrepresenting what he said. Quit trolling.

      • From memory, Mr Smith came out in support of Ms Hanson’s policy to cap immigration, nothing more. When questioned whether he supported her stance which focuses on Muslim immigration, he was quick to dissociate from that perspective more or less stating that he takes no issue with an immigrants creed.
        Now, you’ve stated ‘policies’ he’s supporting, but I’m still only aware of that single Hanson key ‘policy’ of immigration. I’m sceptical, if not cynical of the motivations of people’s political motivations and I’m therefore more than willing to join your side of the argument, but I’m unable to verify what you’ve claimed with regards to this sudden change of gait you are describing in Smith’s support. If you can link your source I’ll definitely read it.

      • You’re wrong again Leith. What he said was he did not support Hanson’s view on Muslims. https://www.theguardian.com/australia-news/2016/dec/06/dick-smith-backs-pauline-hanson-on-immigration. At no time did he say that he disagreed with her other policies. Weasel words see below where he came out in strident fashion only to cut back when pushed on other policies.

        Simon, he did change his mind as I described https://www.theguardian.com/australia-news/2016/dec/06/dick-smith-backs-pauline-hanson-on-immigration

        I remain sceptical. I don’t trust people who groom their persona on the web. Check out earlier views on economic policy, about nuclear energy or about crashing the political system. Sounds almost evangelical. Remind anyone of a Family First Senator who said he had no interest in the construction industry while pontificating on a Senate Committee? I was po- pood then and it turned out to be correct …. thanks for the non apology Leith …. and my nose is smelling the same chlorine with this bloke.
        http://www.smh.com.au/federal-politics/political-news/dick-smith-eyes-bid-to-unseat-bronwyn-bishop-20160120-gma385.html
        http://dicksmithpopulation.com/

        So I’m really sorry to crash the party, but I’ve seen it all before.

      • a Family First Senator who said he had no interest in the construction industry

        Which industry does Smith have an interest in that his motivating his “pontifications”?

    • Where does this hero worship come from?

      Dick’s tapping a deep vein of resentment that will come to a head with an explosion of nationalist sentiment.

      • I agree haroldus, but the point that I’m making is that we’ve seen all of this before.. Sure, if we want to blow the place up then fine just pick your next horse (Trump) and go for it, but expect a lot of damage in the process. Just because we see a knight in shining armour, I’m saying let’s look a bit closer because we’ve been had before.

      • Yeah, but that is what Dick’s doing, despite my smartarse delivery.

        I guess you just gotta make sure it’s you in the brown shirt. (Not implying Dick is a fascist here)

      • I agree haroldus, but do we want someone to crash the place (Trump) and the and end up in a bigger mess? I would enjoy the theatre as much as the next person, but a lot of little people will get hurt which is something we should try to avoid But yeah, frustration does funny things to thinking people.

        And Jason, err no I understood completely, but thank you for your concern.

      • @ Malcolm, yes please blow ‘it’ (unsustainable Australian policy) up. Why wouldn’t you want to destroy this farce we have the nerve to call a working ‘economy’. Jaysus… sell your property portfolio already…

    • Dick also wrote a letter to Manly Daily today explaining he doesn’t agree with all of One Nation policies but that doesn’t stop him supporting them on the perpetual population issue (just like LIB/LAB supporters don’t necessarily support 100% of their policies).

      • He’s preaching to the converted with Manly Daily readers.

        He needs to be putting those ads in the Blacktown Advocate and the Liverpool Leader.

  6. I’d love to be on board with this “Immigration is the problem” meme but to be honest immigration is not the root cause of our problems, net productivity is the problem.
    1) Imagine a society that on a per capita basis creates more Infrastructure than it consumes, that excess is the legacy of the next generation.
    2) Now imagine a society (again on a per capita basis) that consumes more Infrastructure than it produces, this deficit is what the next generation inherits.
    In case 1) we logically want more people because with the addition of people we create a proportionally larger pie, in case 2) we want to shrink the population in an effort to slow our demise. Personally I dont want an Australia that’s locked into a declining economic future with everyone fighting over the scraps that they inherited, what’s stopping us taking the opposite path? the path that results in each additional person producing more than they’ll ever consume.
    When last I looked Australia was a much larger country than just the sum of Sydney’s and Melbourne’s land areas, yet our policies largely ignore this bounty, this abundance has become our mill-stone, phrases like “the tyranny of distance” lock these Syd/Melb centrist ideals into our minds and into our policies. It’s sad truly sad when we blame outsiders for not being able to contribute when in actual fact it’s the system into which they’re being inserted that desperately needs overhauling. This economic system practically guarantees that the average person will consume more infrastructure than they can ever hope to produce, it’s this reality that’s shaping our collective conscientiousness and nurturing our xenophobia.

    • On the other hand, if everyone made more infrastructure than they used we would runout of the rescources of this finite planet even faster than we are now.
      The problem is overpopulation, of this country and the planet.
      We should ivestigate doing enough with less.

      • That’s so wrong headed that it’s hardly worth commenting on
        The exact Infrastructure that a population needs depends on so many factors, it’s not simply a matter of more freeways delivering more people to a more crowded city.
        Think about the structure of some productive US cities, lets take Dallas Texas as an example. The Downtown Dallas commercial district has scarcely grown since the 1980’s oil boom however outlying urban centers like Plano have expanded 100 fold (Plano is about 30Km North of Downtown Dallas) This expansion of Plano businesses went hand in hand with an expansion of the Plano schools, hospitals etc etc and naturally an expansion of the Plano residential areas. Productivity is all about the society creating work/life solutions that expand with population, most people living in Plano also work in or around Plano so their commute times are of the order of 10 to 15 min, even less in many cases. Think about what this means, what commute options it opens, there is no doubt in my mind that a bicycle consumes less resources than a car, so if a bike becomes a viable mode of daily work transport than the society consumes less resources and delivers a higher quality of life.
        Contrast this with Sydney where average commute times are measured in hours, think about how much road area is required just to hold than many cars for that length of time, you don’t need higher level math to see that this is self limiting system.

      • “The problem is overpopulation, of this country and the planet.”

        Nothing that nuking China and cutting off aid to Africa won’t fix.

    • Unfortunately, the dynamic innovative Australia that is the envy of the world does not exist and collectively we just don’t have the imagination or the skills to make it happen. We did have first class universities and, with our natural resources, pretty much all the other necessary ingredients as well. Then we elected economics/law graduates to run the country. These people could never see the difference between making things and writing up mortgages. No, its worse than that. Our commerce/law graduates were part of a professional cast system that operated in the universities back in the 70s and 80s. Top of the heap were Medical students with Law close behind. Science and Engineering were the beginnings of the underclass with Arts students, Vets and then the scum was Physio and any of the social science ring ins. I know this because I was there at the same time as Swan and Rudd. Wayne Swan was over at one of the residential colleges (Emmanual I think).

      The point of this is that many of the problems which get raised on MB can be best explained by understanding the limitations of our leaders. They don’t understand why you can’t just open the doors to fix the economy. They don’t understand why the CSIRO was a national asset. For them legal arguments solve problems and finance and banking is a natural phenomenon. On the other hand, back then Dick Smith was a Radio Ham (which meant he had to have technical skills) and he saw a way to make a business from the burgeoning electronics industry. Despite the fact that DS probably understands maths where ScoMo doesn’t, in the eyes of the Liberal and Labor party, Dick Smith will always be an Untouchable. Similar to a Fish and Chip entrepeneur, but a different underclass.

      Sadly, immigration is a symptom rather than a cause.

    • I agree with you, CB. BUT … until I see the infrastructure actually deployed I’ll remain sceptical. Our rulers have been allowed to get away with vague promises and announceables for too long.

      • Exactly, Politicians profit through the promise of “fixing the Infrastructure problem” actually delivering on this promise would diminish their own worth. god forbid that they ever nurtured or grew an economy that required less physical infrastructure or one where this physical infrastructure could be efficiently created. Actually creating real world infrastructure might be a solution to your problem but it’s definitely not a solution to their problem.

    • I’d agree with this sentiment.

      But I think the point is – until we’ve shown we can manage things better, stop making the problem worse. So much of our economy depends on this meatheaded approach that until the taps are turned off, it won’t be possible for new models to emerge.

      • I would agree with this BUT I can’t actually imagine a better set of recent economic circumstances than those that Australia has just enjoyed. If we can’t provision additional infrastructure and absorb additional people, during/after such good times, than what hope do we have when things get truly challenging.

      • Yep, but our political and business processes are broken. They can’t address the need for large scale infrastructure investment, except as a rent-seeking orgy. Hence they just cream off the easy money from immigration…

      • In business managing growth is always a challenge, however by contrast managing downsizing always turns into a mindless political shit fight..Personally I know which mode of operation I prefer so I’ll take growth every time. I take growth if for no other reason than that growth delivers opportunity to the next generation, whereas a static or shrinking economy locks value into the existing businesses thereby creating generational inequality. Think about the phrases you here all the time in Sydney, I went to the bank of Mum&Dad fro a loan, eventually I’ll inherit my parents house and than I can pay down all these mega debts. These phrases are verbalization of systemic inbuilt inequity.

    • The projects that will increase the productivity of Australians requires infrastructure outside of the capital cities. It would also involve an enormous amount of sacrifice. Imagine how many died to dug the water canals in China during ancient time, the reward however is still there 2000 years later.
      The people in the city will never vote for it.

      • Spot on.
        The infrastructure has to be a plus when evaluated in terms of the effect on the external account. That means in overvalued A$ terms it will never ‘pay’to build ANYTHING outside Sydney and Melbourne.
        The first infrastructure we have to fix is education. The problems there cannot be fixed with more money and change is impossible.
        All in all we’re well and truly screwed.

        Associated with this CB is sort of correct. If the economic settings of the country were right migrants would/could be employed productively. However in the BS economy we park them in Sydney and Melbourne and call it ‘growth” Then we pay foreign workers to do any labour in rural areas. Strewth!

      • I agree, but we’re not even starting down this road, if we want to leverage Australia’s land bounty than I’d start the ball rolling by preferentially advancing our Regional schooling systems. In addition I’d be looking at self sustainable systems for Electricity, water, sewerage etc. Toady we export failed big city concepts to a regional towns the implementation of these ideals often bankrupts the towns that buy into the ideas. This stupidity serves no purpose other than to reinforce the idea that everyone needs to move to either Syd or Melb.
        If you get a chance ask Dick about the quality of the schools around Urunga NSW (I believe that the closest school district to his place) or better still check it out for yourselves
        http://bettereducation.com.au/Results/Hsc.aspx

    • China-Bob – I think the basic problem with your logic is that you assume the consumers of infrastructure & services are contributors to the cost of that, and that also it is ‘self limiting’.

      1. We have 2.4 million third world unskilled migrant guestworkers in Australia on temporary or tourist visas
      2 million temporary visa holders, 1.8 million are unskilled or very unskilled, and the vast majority are from third world countries and only here on a visa pretext to work illegally and repay an foreign agent procurer or send back remittances) and at least 400k of 8 million tourist visa holders (5% of 8 million total short & long stay multiple reentry visitors here to work illegally – ABF).
      These numbers are without any doubt & backed by abf and immigration data.

      Of this 2.4 million – 12 (TWELVE) years worth of our current immigration intake also of 200,000 a year at least one million each are in Sydney and Melbourne.

      That’s one in five people in Sydney or Melbourne consuming a job (they all work, they have no other reason or benefit or funds to not work, most illegally, they do not pay tax or social contribution).

      So they consume jobs (2.4 million jobs when we have 2.4 million Australians seeking work), housing (at least 400,000 dwellings in Sydney or Melbourne mainly low end established housing converted to shared private accomodation & sub let bunk share cash in hand no tax paid rackets.

      They consume Public transport – well over 1 in 5 on any bus or train – all subsided by the Australian tax payer
      They displace Australians in jobs, casualisation, Lower wages, higher cost of living, congestion and social impacts.

      The impact is high and increasing, not self limiting.
      Our two main cities are becoming vast sprawls of basically illegally working non tax paying fake ID false pretext migrant guestworkers sublet slums occupying what used to be Australia.

      2. It’s not self limiting : and the australian tax payer is forced to stump up : NRAS – $4.5 billion intended for australian homeless perverted by Tanya Plibeserk to get ‘international student’ housing instead.
      Or $10.5 billion for Sydney light rail to convey migrant guestworkers to the south east or inner west where developers plan to build even more very high density foreign purchase dog box third world slums).
      Or more tollways & congestion charges.
      Perhaps there is a self limiting factor but at a much lower level of standards than Australians expect.
      A New Delhi or Bangladeshi train or bus limit ?
      A Chinese or south East Asian slum housing level of standard we are now importing ?
      Is that the self limit we want ?

      At a macro level these 2.4 million migrant temporary guestworkers are a huge financial & economic impact
      Only $7 billion comes in, and $36 billion or -2% GDP loss goes out (World Bank 2016) from the $104 billion illegal underground migrant guestworker sub economy..

      Wouldn’t it be better to face up to the real issue ?

      We have 2.4 million – 1 million in each major city of very low skilled unassimilated illegally working not tax paying or anything else migrant guestworkers on fake sham or pretext visas here only to consume jobs housing and provide little or nothing back.

      This is why we need a Royal Commission into the whole temporary & tourist visa racket.

      • In fact I know an entire group of suburbs who’s profile fits your very description… Springvale to the SE of Melbourne is a full on, illegal immigrant, working with a dodgy visa, extreme high house prices for what are basically slums which house 20 -30 people each (yes this is how a run down 50’s weatherboard surrounded by squalour can sell for over $1million) Many of the Businesses there are not dependent on underpaid ‘guest’ workers but do so to fill their own pockets and keep their family in new BMW’s etc. They also house the workers that come in to pick the crops and run ‘gangmaster’ businesses that revolve around it. Real estate agents do not advertise to English speaking locals either.
        This indeed is ‘Growth’ and I see it a microcosm of Australia as a whole and the quality of growth our politicians are desiring.
        Ps, as for my knowledge of this area of Melbourne,, I have spent half my life nearby and I am indirectly related to one of the local businessmen there who brags about not paying real wages, nor having health and safety, nor paying tax, or about having his house rebuilt but charging the entire cost to his import business.

    • In regards to productivity, consider latest ABS stats (below) which show in last 12 months a decline of 51k fulltime jobs and increase of 138k part time jobs. This is inline with MB’s recurring theme on underemployment. We have more productivity capacity with existing population and there is clearly intent not to fully utilise that capacity.

      Nobody asking for a complete stop to immigration just to slow it down and give existing aussies a better chance of gaining full employment and owning a house.

      http://www.abs.gov.au/ausstats/[email protected]/Latestproducts/6202.0Media%20Release1Nov%202016?opendocument&tabname=Summary&prodno=6202.0&issue=Nov%202016&num=&view=

      • http://dicksmithpopulation.com/contact/

        http://dicksmithpopulation.com/about-dick-smith/

        Dick Smith is one of Australia’s most recognised individuals. After a successful business career in retailing and publishing, Dick has become well known as a restless adventurer, making many pioneering and record breaking flights by helicopter, aeroplane and balloon.

        He has also been active in public service having served as Chairman of the Civil Aviation Authority and later as chair of the Civil Aviation Safety Board. He led the National Council for the Centenary of Federation and served as an Ambassador for the Council for Aboriginal Reconciliation.

        Dick is a passionate supporter of environmental and conservation efforts and since 1995 has been Chairman of the Australian Geographic Society. Less well known is his work as a philanthropist. He is a supporter of many charities and individuals in need. In recognition of this he was honoured as Australian of the Year in 1986.

        Dick has never been shy to take on controversial issues, from aviation safety to support for refugees and the campaign to return David Hicks to Australia.

        Recently he has involved himself in another contentious issue- Australia’s population future. Concerned about our expected rapid population increase, Dick is calling for a national debate on what he considers to be the most important issue facing the nation.

        Written by Simon Nasht, Director of “Addicted to Money”, 2009

  7. I’m hoping someone can explain this quote by Raymond Yeung from ANZ in The Australian yesterday.
    “Merchandise or even service trades are only a part of the story. With China expanding their foreign investment overseas, it is a golden opportunity for Australia to capture the opportunities”, he says.
    “For instance, if Chinese investors are buying a residential or commercial property in Australia, they are effectively buying raw materials. This form of export creates a lot more jobs locally than simply a shipment of bulks.”

    Am I reading this right – Australian property is now regarded as “raw materials”?
    Nothing left to sell, so we’re prostituting the place?

    • Fantastic isn’t it?

      We leverage up to employ some people to assemble some concrete and metal on some overpriced land, and then sell it to some Chinese as a Unit of Investment. They fund the purchase by borrowing against their own overpriced structures.

      What could possibly go wrong?

  8. Im glad he is pushing this population debate into the open. It would be good come election time he launched a similar advertisment on tv reaching a larger audience. People need to finally open their eyes and look around them …

    • Exactly. He is going to take a hiding from the Greens (Someone That I Used To Vote(for) sung to Gotye’s eponymous song) and other SJWs but deep down plenty of folks know he’s right.

      Good on him for taking one for the team.

      Worth the price of admission to see him flay Welterweight Wobbly Waleed

  9. “Our responsibility is to plan for this to make our city more liveable, sustainable and productive, rather than to debate the facts.” = “Our responsibility is to [make broad, vague and feel-good statements] rather than to [acknowledge] the facts.”

  10. Malcolm Turnbull.
    Achievements since becoming PM..
    0

    Oh wait….there are a couple of notable disasters.

    1)To sell out Australian children in favor of overseas interests

    2)Enabling the property Ponzi abortion to continue unrestricted via importing so-called wealth to increase property prices, keep the banks happy and decimate our locals aspiration of home ownership.

    3)Increase job casualisation of the workforce so that people now live with the anxiety of having to work multiple part time jobs just to tread water and pay ridiculous rents to cashed up investors.

    4) Go on TV and present as the smug clever bastards they are and disrespect the electorate to such a degree they don’t give a shit.

    We are being screwed and everybody knows it butt few with the power to change, are.

    Children and youth of Australia…..take note of the con your Australian government is inflicting on you.

    This is not the 1950-60s.
    There are no large snowy mountain schemes to justify large increases in population.

    Cut immigration to zero now.

    We do not have the jobs.

  11. The main problem with this ad is that it’s overly shrill. Affinity with the earth?! What about the many arguments in favour of apartment blocks, such as access to amenities, transport and entry-level housing?

    The focus on road traffic is regrettable, why not talk about public transport? Perhaps not surprising for someone that flies a Cessna to work.

    If Dick Smith wants to win the debate he has to prove how cutting immigration will help grow the economy. If he can’t do this then this ad would have been better placed in a Greens newsletter.

    • “Affinity with the earth?! What about the many arguments in favour of apartment blocks”

      Dick’s point is that housing choice has been removed. Apartments are now the only choice available to young buyers. And then only at a stretch.

      “The focus on road traffic is regrettable, why not talk about public transport?”

      Sydney’s public transport system is also under strain. What’s your point?

      “If Dick Smith wants to win the debate he has to prove how cutting immigration will help grow the economy”.

      How does mass immigration “grow the economy” in per capita terms? You will need to demonstrate this if you want your persistent comments in favour of a ‘Big Australia’ to have credibility.

      • From a marketing perspective, and appeal, affinity to the Earth is incredibly poor prose.

        It stuck right out and stuck in my head as being poorly fitting to the narrative.

        Instead of drawing a positive link to nature – I agree with him, by the way – standing atop Mont Ventoux or Golden Point at Hotham, ‘na mean? – it sticks in your mind.

        Would have been worth 1000 bucks to send it over to Drayton Bird to refine

    • “What about the many arguments in favour of apartment blocks, such as access to amenities, transport and entry-level housing?”

      Amenities – not much good if overrun with people.
      Transport – not helpful if your road is jammed with thousands of extra cars, or your train carriage with dozens of extra people.
      Entry-level housing – bugger all use if its price is bid up by hundreds of thousands of new market entrants.

      Next.

    • If Dick Smith wants to win the debate he has to prove how cutting immigration will help grow the economy.

      Doesn’t sound necessary to me. On the other hand, pointing out that high immigration reduces workers wages could be sufficient.

  12. One issue not discussed with immigration is that it is a market building issue -> ie extra immigrants with a vested interest in a party over time can slew the vote in interesting ways which strategists from the big parties well know.

    there needs to be some deeper consideration given to the issue on this basis.

    the economic arguments are already sorting themselves out -> just look to europe, trump, one nation etc

    • Young – you are correct. Immigration, as it is now done, very directly connects with the necessity to sell off our farms businesses resources and RE to foreigners.
      I reckon that connection would make anti-immigration a sure-fire winner

      • when viewed in capital terms, lets take the example of a share dilution event.

        new shares are issued -> ie new immigrants come in the voting rights are diluted as are the payoff on an EPS basis

        however, the way voting and lobbying occurs in a democracy (opt in rather than opt out) – the threshold for decision control is very different to a SH bloc-> ie the 51% hurdle is stratified

        the argument that EPS increases with immigration may hold in some sectors or for some segments due to economic growth -> yet the strategic control is not understood and is being traded away over time which distorts preferences of existing shareholders -> essentially a hostile takeover over time

        it’s certainly a trojan horse risk. Difficult to quarantine this risk as Australian’s don’t understand democracy other than as part of their entitlement to own houses.

        Australia = Troy

        Positions/Interests are dynamic -> over the long run, they need further consideration, if a system’s form of decision making is materially changed by immigration policy, this is not racism, this is simply being informed about the nature of these changes.

    • “extra immigrants with a vested interest in a party over time can slew the vote in interesting ways which strategists from the big parties well know.”

      Mark Blyth had an interesting take on this issue in recent US election. Had Clinton won and offered amnesty to millions of illegal immigrants it would have been the death of the Republicans, and subsequent policy heavily skewed in favour of migrants.

      EDIT: It might have been one of the republicans and not Blyth. Maybe Ann Coulter.

      • According to Christopher Hitchins this was a big determinant of Labour immigration policy in England. It had little/nothing to do with humanitarian or economic factors. Just it was reasoned immigrants would vote Labour and would ensconce them in power forever.

  13. Leith this is a serious question. Your statement above ‘it is primarily mass immigration that is causing Sydney’s housing. . . . woes”. Leaving aside the arguments about infrastructure, do you actually believe that immigration is the primary reason for Sydney’s housing woes? What about cheap money, negative gearing/capital gains tax benefits and tulip mentality? It seems an overstatement to me and I am interested in whether you genuinely believe immigration is the ‘primary’ concern here or if you are just letting this sort of statement slip through.

    • Blaming immigration is in vogue these days. Arguing NG, CTG and credit control fraud over the last several years just doesn’t illicit the same response. The main reason people doesn’t like to hear they themselves are the problem, they would much rather blame everything on other people. Hence NG, CTG and credit control fraud gets no traction and immigration do. But in reality immigration was our own fault as well. We purposely chose to let in the c-team of migrants to satisfy business lobbies… Think Howard’s hairdressing and cake making visas and Abbott’s low bar 457s.

      • Immigration is the basis of today’s population growth strategy. Not being in favour of high population growth rate has been in “vogue” for a long time.

  14. This conversation is just beginning. Good to see Dick raising his profile.

    Soon Dick will be on everybody’s lips.

    The whole country will be crying out for Dick!

  15. NAB Chairman today, from AFR:
    “Dr Henry said population growth of between 300,000 to 400,000 per year was putting pressure on infrastructure and housing affordability in some capital cities.

    That would require significant infrastructure investment over time, some of it in regional hubs.
    “And that means we are going to have to have a much more considered, forward-looking approach to planning,” he said. ”

    Again, population growth of that magnitude is a POLICY DECISION, so it can be changed.

  16. What the? 3% population growth and we are now at 1.4% and falling…..
    I do not think we have even been at 3%, checking…..

    I have chat with Dick and he has zero understanding that 30% of our population growth is actually our demographic momentum, or more people living longer and it is the old age years that are experiencing the highest % growth.

    • There was a one-off spike in the early seventies at about 2.7% That’s the highest it’s ever been.
      3% is higher than Nigeria’s population growth (2.8%) with TFR just under 5.0 – it would require almost 3 immigrants (net) for every baby born, which seems fanciful.

      • Spot on, Rage. If we were to believe willy, the population number is about to drop off a cliff any moment now, but the number keeps growing in the meantime, and in any case, if most people are concentrated in a few, especially two large cities, it’s not quite the same as say, the US where there is more of a spread.

    • “30% of our population growth is actually our demographic momentum”

      That is actually quite an interesting stat, thanks. Our fertility rate currently at 1.77. Do you know how far away we are from normalising? i.e. population would shrink without immigration?

      The other interesting stat would be how much of that growth is obscured by a spurt of migrants having children. Our schools are overflowing which means we have had a increase of children. These children will be listed as Australians rather than immigrants.

    • “30% of our population growth is actually our demographic momentum”

      In that case we should be trying even harder to reduce immigration.

  17. Dick Smith has the right intentions but the public debate is still not centred on the core issue :
    The temporary & tourist visa racket.
    One in five people in Sydney or Melbourne is on a temporary or tourist visa : consuming housing jobs $ usage of infrastructure. Twelve years worth of the yearly immigration intake. That’s the issue.

    We have 2.4 million third world unskilled migrant guestworkers in Australia on temporary or tourist visas
    2 million temporary visa holders, 1.8 million are unskilled or very unskilled, and the vast majority are from third world countries and only here on a visa pretext to work illegally and repay an foreign agent procurer or send back remittances).
    We have at least 400k of 8 million tourist visa holders (5% of 8 million total short & long stay multiple reentry visitors here to work illegally – ABF).
    Thats 2.4 million and these numbers are without any doubt & backed by ABF and Immigration data.

    Of this 2.4 million – 12 (TWELVE) years worth of our current immigration intake (plus the 200,000 a year of immigration.. ) at least One Million Each are in Sydney and Melbourne.

    That’s One in Five people in Sydney or Melbourne consuming a job (they all work, they have no other reason or benefit or funds to not work, most illegally, they do not pay tax or social contribution).

    So they consume jobs (2.4 million jobs when we have 2.4 million Australians seeking work).
    They consume housing (at least 400,000 dwellings in Sydney or Melbourne mainly low end established housing converted to shared private accomodation & sub let bunk share cash in hand no tax paid rackets.
    In fact they are nearly half the renters in Australia.
    (Btw Corelogic completely misses this $24 billion underground sub let industry of which only $8 billion or so if rental is ever declared. That’s why their stats and rental yields to dwelling value are so incorrect)

    The migrant temporary visa guestworkers heavily consume Public transport – well over 1 in 5 on any bus or train – all subsided by the Australian tax payer

    They displace Australians in jobs, casualisation, Lower wages, higher cost of living, congestion and social impacts.

    The impact is high and increasing.
    Our two main cities are becoming vast sprawls of basically illegally working non tax paying fake ID false pretext migrant guestworkers sublet slums occupying what used to be Australia.

    The Australian tax payer is forced to stump up : NRAS – $4.5 billion intended for australian homeless
    perverted by Tanya Plibeserk to house ‘international student’ housing instead. 279,000 Australians now homeless or seeking housing. (MB yesterday)

    Or the $10.5 billion for Sydney light rail to convey migrant guestworkers to the south east or inner west driven by Developers plan to build even more very high density foreign purchase dog box third world slums).
    Or more tollways & congestion charges.

    Perhaps there is a self limiting factor but at a much lower level of standards than Australians expect.
    A New Delhi or Bangladeshi train or bus limit ?
    A Chinese or south East Asian slum housing level of standard we are now importing ?
    Is this what we want ?

    At a macro level these 2.4 million migrant temporary guestworkers are a huge financial & economic impact
    Only $7 billion comes in, and $36 billion or -2% GDP loss goes out (World Bank 2016) from the $104 billion illegal underground migrant guestworker sub economy..

    Wouldn’t it be better to face up to the real issue ?

    We have 2.4 million – 1 million in each major city of very low skilled unassimilated illegally working not tax paying or anything else migrant guestworkers on fake sham or pretext visas here only to consume jobs housing and provide little or nothing back.

    One in five people in Sydney & Melbourne..

    This is where the public debate needs to be focused.

    This is why we need a Royal Commission into the whole temporary & tourist visa racket.

  18. Government logic:

    > Destroy family unit and gender relations through Marxist & feminist propaganda

    > Make it impossible for you to ever afford a house through market manipulation & utterly insane student loans that most people should never be allowed to get in the first place

    > Tax the shit out of you to redistribute wealth to immigrants so you’ll never be able to afford children even if you do manage to get a house and a significant other

    Haha birthrates are falling so we better fund more immigration to make up for it! :^)

  19. This was supposed to be an easy outing High Tea for Lucy Turnbull. Many first wives work for causes, Lucy does charity work for Golden Sachs and other disadvantaged banks.

    Stand up Dick, time to trump Australian politics. Build the base, build the base, build the base.

    Go heckle them from the visitors gallery at parliament house. Call em out from the gallery. Throw chinese RMB bills into the air over them.

  20. Maybe we could honour our national treasure with a lifesize statue?

    Nothing would express Aussie pride more than a giant bronze Dick next to the Alamein fountain at the top of the Cross.

  21. The children of migrants are hiding the true impact of immigration? Are you f…..ing serious? That is about as weak an argument one could possibly make to dismiss ABS immigration data. Leith, you are sounding more and more like a classic right wing nut case, and are in danger of being cast as such. Stay on message and deal with the facts or this whole website will be dragged into the gutter by your anti-immigrant ranting!

    https://www.theguardian.com/commentisfree/2016/nov/28/alt-right-online-poison-racist-bigot-sam-harris-milo-yiannopoulos-islamophobia

    • Now, now.

      Leith could/should have explained this better but this is explained by others in this post,

      I’d still like to see the data though. Does ABS publish data that examines and then explains Leith’s point?

    • Hi BigBaka, I am also concerned that MB now tolerates the Hansonites and the population posts are now overrun by pro-Hanson comments. That’s not to say that the population Ponzi isn’t a real issue, it is, and I am very disappointed that the left in Australia refuses to touch it. Indeed, amongst my left-wing friends Dick Smith’s recent decision to support Hanson’s plan to reduce immigration intake was painted simply as “Dick Smith is a racist”. Five years ago the left was allowed to express an opinion that a Big Australia was undesirable. The Greens used to have a sustainable population policy. Bob Carr said Sydney is full. Kelvin Thomson was allowed to speak his mind. Gillard said she didn’t believe in a Big Australia. Why is this now a taboo topic on the left? Can the left afford to simple cede the issue to the Hansonites given the rise of right-wing populism and abti-globalisation around the world?

  22. Bill and Hillary.
    Malcolm and Lucy.
    Francis and Claire.
    All House of Cards.
    Too much power under the one roof.
    People will wake up one day….. unfortunately it is always too late.
    Overpopulation is the silent cancer destroying our great lifestyles. We are slowly (or quickly) adopting Asian style living. Go there if that’s what your looking for.

  23. Big population = big market for consumption.

    Theoretically means businesses will prosper…. but much much later, when infrastructure adapts to the population as well as the corporations sees benefits in bringing more of their businesses over.
    Meanwhile, the CURRENT population WILL suffer unemployment, significant reduction in living standards, congestion, affordable housing etc.

    However the boomers, or the population with established wealth and assets will benefit significantly.

    The decision making and occurrences are too ILLOGICAL and DUMB to be based on IGNORANCE…. its by design. Its intentional.

  24. At the next federal election, I am putting a number 1 next to Dick Smith on my ballot paper. If his name isn’t on the ballot, I’ll write it on. #DickSmithforPM