Australian LNG

Australian LNG has a long history of pioneering investment. From the North West shelf to the first floating LNG project ever constructed.

Like other Australian commodities this history aligns with that of development economics of Asia. The first wave of Australian LNG development grew to service a modernising Japan and its demand for energy.  This bilateral relationship has a long history of cordial relations, share-equity investment and oil-linked contract pricing to satisfy both parties.

The second wave of Australian LNG was far more chaotic, matching the staggeringly swift rise of the much larger Chinese economy. It began along with the pre-GFC oil boom and Malthusian assumption that the world was going to fall short of everything as the enormous Chinese and then Indian middle classes ballooned and consumed more energy per capita.

Multitudinous LNG projects were sanctioned in Australia which found itself by 2010 developing no fewer than seven LNG project simultaneously. Needless to say this did not end well with gigantic cost blowouts for all as they competed for labour and other resources.

Yet, as the commodity super cycle peaked in 2011, demand suddenly fell well short of expectations and kept doing so over the next four years. Making matters worse, the US shale revolution suddenly turned that nation from net LNG importer to net exporter of a magnitude equal to Australian LNG. The global glut from 2015 was enormous.

The Australian LNG boom included a particularly cavalier offshoot in QLD where coal seam gas was liquefied via three projects on Curtis Island. As the boom subsided, and oil-linked prices crashed, the companies involved were all either sold or destroyed.

The legacy left by the projects was one of very high Australian gas prices with very low Asian gas prices, also delivering an huge blow to the competitiveness of the east coast economy. Thus the $200bn investment proved to be the greatest single capital mis-allocation in the history of the Australian economy (and surely global energy markets) and was little more than a monument to Banana Republic economics as tax takes failed, income fell and hollowing out transpired on raised local costs.

MacroBusiness was the only analytic house to call the Australian LNG bubble early, track it and predict its demise. It continues to cover the LNG sector with daily updates and a large grain skepticism and is a must read for anyone that needs to know the economic forces coming to bear on the sector.

Also check – Daily Iron Ore Price, Australian Dollar

19

ACCC: Gas cartel lied through its teeth to governments

Via the ABC: The head of Australia’s consumer watchdog has slammed the gas industry, accusing it of misleading governments into approving massive gas export projects that have led to soaring power prices, killing off companies and jobs. “A lot of the things that Australian governments, politicians, were told when those projects went ahead, turned out

6

Powerless Nev shrinks from low gas price targets

It’s all for bloody show, at The Australian: National COVID-19 Coordination Commission chairman Nev Power has pushed back on energy industry criticism of his $4 target for domestic gas prices, admitting the low price is a “stretch target” but saying it’s an achievable goal in the long term. “We’ve put out there some target of

4

NSW inhales cartel gas rather than producing it

This entire debate is de-anchored and now revolves around tiny, not to mention corrupt, numbers like this: Opponents of Santos’ $3.6 billion Narrabri gas project have attacked assertions from the company and the state government about its benefits for jobs and energy prices, pointing to analysis provided to the NSW government that found manufacturing jobs

5

Gas cartel rogers “gas-led recovery”

God knows why the Morrison Government is so keen to support the gas cartel. It’s not grateful. Via The Australian: “When prices are being touted that are lower than the cost of getting it out of the ground, they are just not based in the reality of today,” Shell Australia chairman Tony Nunan told The

13

Some preposterous gas cartel apologism

Yesterday saw energy boffin Graeme Bethune appear at the AFR to argue that there “is no market failure in Aussie gas”: So, is it true that higher gas prices have failed to promote new east coast supply? No. The Cooper Basin achieved the highest level of production in nearly a decade in the 2020 March

5

Propaganda heaped on Santos’ gas pillaging

Truly we are living in an alternative universe now. The AFR is one of the chief authors of the fantasy: Santos will have to satisfy independent commissioners that have form in rejecting coal projects in NSW on the grounds of their long-lasting environmental impacts and strong community opposition to push ahead with what would be

4

Another LNG import terminal emerges

With each new proposal, the far more sensible approach of gas reservations diminishes. This time Viva Energy: Interesting that Viva doesn’t even mention importing gas from other countries. Only “northern fields”. How can it possibly be cheaper to import gas from QLD via liquefaction, shipping and regasification instead of by one simple pipeline? When one

6

Aussie gas sails in circles as locals can’t get any

Via Domain: Australia’s lucrative exports of natural gas are being hit by a global supply glut and the coronavirus crisis destroying demand, with dozens of cargoes either anchored offshore or idling at sea as Asian buyers delay deliveries. While oil prices begin showing signs of recovering from historic lows, traders and analysts say the worst

8

What kind of world makes LNG imports rational?

Via The Australian: The developer of a major LNG import terminal, backed by mining billionaire Andrew Forrest, has warned that NSW and Victoria risk running out of gas by 2022, with the industry paralysed by regulatory uncertainty and low oil prices delaying urgent ­investments needed to cover a supply shortfall. …However, the developer said the

17

Santos to poison NSW for thousands of years as it steals from it

And the outrage goes on, at the AFR: Santos’ $2 billion-plus Narrabri gas project is set to proceed for assessment under NSW’s independent planning process after the lower house of the state government voted down a bill on a moratorium on coal seam gas that controversially secured Labor’s support in the Upper House. Chief executive

10

Nev Power’s great gas fakening

It didn’t take long for Nev Power’s boondoggle to descend into farce, at the AFR: Former Fortescue Metals boss Nev Power has distanced himself from plans to dramatically increase public spending on gas infrastructure, saying a leaked document does not represent the view of the government’s COVID-19 commission. A manufacturing taskforce established as part of

4

Shell has a good laugh at manufactruing rennaisance

At least it’s honest about gutting the economy, via The Australian: The National COVID-19 Co-ordination Commission, chaired by former Dow Chemicals boss Andrew Liveris, recommended the federal government take immediate action to create an gas market that could deliver globally competitive results similar to the US with gas available at just $4 a gigajoule, more

3

Andrew Liveras disgorges dog’s vomit on energy

At the AFR the bogus debate rolls on: The controversial proposals from the Andrew Liveris-led manufacturing taskforce would take government involvement in the gas supply sector to a new level in Australia and have set the scene for a renewed clash between manufacturers and gas producers over prices. …Engendering most debate in the draft report

6

Qatar turns the LNG screw

More excellent news for Australian energy prices. Qatar is flooding the global market, at the AFR: Qatar is forging ahead with the expansion of the world’s largest liquefied natural gas project and eyeing investment opportunities overseas despite a slump in global energy demand and the collapse of oil prices. Saad al-Kaabi, the country’s energy minister

11

There will be no Australian manufacturing recovery

Via The Guardian: Australian taxpayers should underwrite a massive expansion of the domestic gas industry – including helping open new fields and build hundreds of kilometres of pipelines – according to a group advising on Covid-19 recovery. A leaked draft report by a manufacturing taskforce advising the National Covid-19 Coordination Commission (NCCC) recommends the Morrison

26

The Coalition has stolen Australia’s energy future

Big news, at the AFR: Domestic gas will play an increasing role over coal in backing up the growing renewable energy sector over the next decade. But, beyond that, cleaner technologies including concentrated solar thermal power, hydrogen and even small-scale nuclear reactors could be used instead. The federal government’s long-awaited technology road map, which charts

12

Mirabile dictu! China to target Aussie LNG next?

Let’s hope so, via Platts: The latest flare up between Australia and China has ensnared more commodities but the likelihood of LNG being impacted is relatively low, despite vulnerabilities stemming from an oversupplied market and China’s growing options for gas imports, experts said. In the past week, China suspended Australian beef imports and threatened tariffs

1

Australia’s gas chance is NOW

Rio wants it fixed, at The Australian: Rio Tinto boss Jean Sebastien Jacques says sorting out Australia’s long-term energy policy should be a key plank in the federal government’s plans to bring the national economy back from the coronavirus crisis, saying cheap and reliable power is one of the keys to economic recovery. Speaking to

0

Shell cuts LNG ouput

Via Argus: Shell expects to reduce LNG production by 8-17pc this quarter as global LNG demand slows because of the Covid-19 outbreak. Shell may need to reduce oil and gas production, LNG liquefaction, and utilisation of refining and chemicals plants as a result of demand or regulatory requirements or constraints in infrastructure, the firm said,

2

Energy chaos to destroy Scomo’s reform agenda

Via The Guardian: Independent MP Zali Steggall has asked the auditor general to investigate a Morrison government scheme to underwrite gas, hydro and coal power, saying it lacks transparency and citing legal advice that the Coalition had no constitutional or legislative authority to introduce it. Announced in late 2018 after the government abandoned Malcolm Turnbull’s proposed national energy

8

Oil prices lowest in 150 years

Via Deutsche: Monday’s remarkable session for oil still resonates through markets with the May WTI contract trading at -$37.63 per barrel at the end of the session. Although we’ve bounced since, this still marks yet another extraordinary chapter in the history of financial markets. We thought it would be interesting to raid our long-term database