No joy for tourism

The ABS released its September Overseas Arrivals and Departures report today and sadly there is no joy to report for tourism with arrivals down 2400 and departures up 2100:

We saw in the export figures earlier that manufacturing exports has bounced quickly on the back of a falling dollar. It is perhaps no surprise that holidays take longer. After all, not many of us jump on a plane overseas on one month’s notice.

David Llewellyn-Smith

Comments

  1. Does this mean that with respect to ‘residents’ there are more people leaving than arriving ?

    • It may have looked even worse without the publicity gained from Oprah.

      Not trying to defend the $ spent on or hype generated over Oprah, just pointing out you have no idea what the alternative reality would look like if we didn’t, just from looking at those numbers.

  2. Diogenes the CynicMEMBER

    If (When) the Aussie dollar goes back below $0.80 you will see a change in these figures. But until then it is O/S time. The price disparity for equivalent holidays is 30-70% cheaper.

    We had some Canadian visitors last month, they were shocked by how expensive everything is in Australia (transport, restaurants, groceries, ticket prices to tourism hotspots). If Canadians find us expensive then we must be way out of line.

    • “We had some Canadian visitors last month, they were shocked by how expensive everything is in Australia (transport, restaurants, groceries, ticket prices to tourism hotspots). If Canadians find us expensive then we must be way out of line.”

      I wouldn’t have though Canada, with its proximity to the US, would have a particularly high cost of living ?

      Having recently returned to Australia after spending a few years living in Switzerland, however, I can confirm the cost of living here is ludicrously high at the moment and has increased noticably since ~2006 when I left.

          • bingo bongo.

            ridiculously high minimum wages dont help either (one of the reasons why our service staff are so pathetic in comparison to many other countries).

          • it’s all about huge credit bubble driven money creation

            We had a huge credit bubble in 2003 but the dollar was less than 60c. By international standards Australia was cheap.

            Today with the dollar hovering around $1.05, Australia is very expensive.

            Its all about the dollar.

        • Its down to our minimum wages, our superannuation costs our payroll costs, Landlords charging way too much for business leases/rentals, its price gouging (Just recently some US companies have dropped prices for goods, such as Cannon to reduce people buying over seas) and our high Australian dollar. I dont think its much to do with our geographical isolation because we are closer to China than both Europe and the USA.

        • I’m inclined to say it’s a combination of those, plus a large dash of massive real estate bubble thrown in.

          We have fairly strong labour laws (which I am largely in favour of), so labour here is never going to be as cheap as it is in, say, the US.

          I think the actual effect of Geographical Isolation (ie: transport costs) is fairly small in and of itself, but combines “well” with limited import avenues to result in price gouging. Cars are one place where this is most visible, with some manufacturers like BMW and Mercedes charging outrageous premiums (tens of thousands of dollars – 30-40% – if not more) for their vehicles compared to similar countries like the UK.

          And sitting behind it all is a real estate bubble, driving up prices across the board.

  3. Ticket to Eiffel Tower costs about $10-$15 AUD.

    Ticket to Rome Colloseum costs about $10 AUD.

    Ticket to Sydney Harbour Bridge about $150

    Ticket into Uluru National Park is about $30

    It’s not hard to work out why people don’t come here.

    • “Ticket to Sydney Harbour Bridge about $150”

      In fairness, the Bridgeclimb is actually a hour or so guided tour rather than a “walk around on your own” situation, and the liability insurance premium is probably mind-boggling.

  4. Check out the Pascometer’s article on this today:

    “everything is great, its just that Tourism Australia are sh%t”

    I’m paraphrasing of course, but then he shoots himself in foot by showing the numbers from 2001 to 2011.

    Average growth rate= 2.1%

    Last years growth rate = 0.08% (400 more visitors)

    But don’t worry, the Chinese are coming!!!

  5. ceteris paribus

    I reckon the prices for the northern tourism markets (N-W Aust, Darwin/Uluru and Far North Queensland) are comparatively outrageous.

    What do others think?