Michael Pettis: China easing off tightening

Exclusively from Michale Pettis’ newsletter:

Three months ago during their 2010 Q4 conference, the PBoC said that they believed that the global economic recovery would continue in 2011, although they acknowledged a great deal of uncertainty. The PBoC also said that stabilizing the price level was their top priority, and the central bank planned to control the “main gate” of liquidity inflows and to bring credit growth to “normal” levels.

Chen Long at SWS notified me yesterday of a change in tone. In their 2011 Q1 conference earlier this week the PBoC said that the fundamental basis of the global recovery is not very solid. The central bank still acknowledges that stabilizing price levels is an important task, but they only refer to “managing liquidity efficiently”.

What does this imply? I suspect it means that policymakers are becoming a little more concerned with slowing growth and a little less concerned about domestic overheating. As I argued in the past few newsletters, growth may be slowing more quickly than Beijing would like, and combined with the very volatile external environment, I suspect they are going to be cautious about too much more tightening. We will see how many more interest rate hikes and reserve requirement hikes we are likely to get in the next quarter.

Houses and Holes

David Llewellyn-Smith is Chief Strategist at the MB Fund and MB Super. David is the founding publisher and editor of MacroBusiness and was the fouding publisher and global economy editor of The Diplomat, the Asia Pacific’s leading geo-politics and economics portal.

He is also a former gold trader and economic commentator at The Sydney Morning Herald, The Age, the ABC and Business Spectator. He is the co-author of The Great Crash of 2008 with Ross Garnaut and was the editor of the second Garnaut Climate Change Review.

Did you know the MB International Shares Fund has returned an average of 17.1% per annum and the Tactical Growth Fund an average of 10.4%? Register below to learn more:

Latest posts by Houses and Holes (see all)

Comments

  1. Is this the same as his blog post but just a few days early?

    If China is jumping on the accelerator again, might be time to load up on Rio Tinto!

  2. HHmm, where have i seen another chart look similar to China’s credit inflation chart…..oh that’s right, the iro ore price chart