Public service shuns Australia’s youth

By Leith van Onselen

Just when you thought things couldn’t get much worse for Australia’s youth, where unemployment is already at its highest level since October 1998 (see next chart), The Canberra Times is reporting today that the proportion of under-25s in public service roles has halved since 2007, due to outsourcing and changing hiring policies, which has sought to employ older workers:

ScreenHunter_6044 Feb. 12 15.00

Only 2.5 per cent of federal public servants are under 25, the latest figures show, and their numbers are shrinking fast – down from 5 per cent in 2007…

Meantime, the Commonwealth’s 55-plus brigade is the only age group in the bureaucracy that is growing.

Public sector workforce expert Linda Colley, of the of Central Queensland University, says changes in hiring practices and policies have resulted in the public service abandoning its traditional role of training Australia’s young workers.

According to the latest Statistical Bulletin from the Public Service Commission, some departments risk becoming “Dad’s Armies”, with nearly 60 per cent of Defence bureaucrats and nearly 55 per cent of Veterans’ Affairs staffers over 45…

“The 60-and-over age group had the largest growth, 0.4 per cent, in ongoing employment this year, followed by the 55- to 59-year age group, increasing by 0.2 per cent,” the bulletin read.

“All other age groups decreased in size.

“The proportion of employees 50 years of age and over has grown strongly over time, increasing from 20 per cent of all ongoing employees at June 2000 to 31.4 per cent at June 2014.”

Chalk this up to yet another loss for Australia’s youth, who are already having to deal with the Government’s open-slather approach to foreign work visas, tougher access to unemployment benefits, rising university fees, not to mention extortionate housing costs.

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Comments

  1. This is chicken and the egg stuff.
    Is it that the youth have made themselves unemployable, or the employers dont want young employees.?
    My call is that is the former.WW

      • UE you are arguing with the facts not me, I agree with the facts, and add the rider, youth today are more and more unemployable.
        Project ths out 5 years and you have a disaster, I have called that all along.
        The issue is what do you do about it.
        Could you hazard a guess at the median age of the respondents to this site. My call is 40 plus. I would say there are zero respondents under 20 yrs of age. How come, your response?? WW

      • WW, i usually agree with most of what you say, but that’s quite a generalisation there. I’m mid 20’s have been a reader for well over a year and subscriber for almost a year.

        I disagree that youths have made themselves unemployable, companies don’t want to hire people with zero experience, and when coming out of uni you have zero experience.

      • My call is 40 plus. I would say there are zero respondents under 20 yrs of age. How come, your response??

        Probably because most under the age of 20 are flipping burgers, studying at uni or pulling cable. Not sitting on their arse in a cushy office job spending hours of work time commenting on online blogs.

      • “UE you are arguing with the facts not me, I agree with the facts, and add the rider, youth today are more and more unemployable.”

        Why? You’ve provided no reason as to why they are less employable.

      • Could you hazard a guess at the median age of the respondents to this site. My call is 40 plus. I would say there are zero respondents under 20 yrs of age.

        What is your basis for arguing it would have been any different in an equivalent forum twenty years ago ?

      • 19 here, and frankly, the reason we are ‘unemployable’ as some so adamantly claim, is due to the fact that our predecessors (and the state of the current media trends) messed up. As the article points out, wages as a cost to business’ here in Australia have become too high, leading to outsourcing, and the ever-growing housing bubble, seems no signs of stopping, as a result of adult greed, driving housing prices up. The government don’t seem to give a damn, and seemingly enjoy killing off the future hand that would have potentially fed them. What more, the government seem to be attempting to privatize tertiary education, and following the American model. I can only think of this is down right stupid. You do not copy America. We don’t need another country creating some non-sense system like the petro-dollar.

        We have a serious aging population, and focusing employment in the upper age-groups isn’t a solution. Take a bullet now, and train your youth, or let that bullet turn into a nuke. It;s their choice.

      • “Every generation
        Blames the one before
        And all of their frustrations
        Come beating on your door

        So we open up a quarrel
        Between the present and the past
        We only sacrifice the future
        It’s the bitterness that lasts”

        I am so over this generational war bullshit that passes for informed debate on this site some correspondents can’t seem to see past it.

        WW says that youth today are “unemployable” Clearly a nonsense generalisation. Wh1te blames his predecessors for the problems of the world. Also clearly a nonsense generalisation.

        Let’s do without the hyperbole as focus on the key issue here. Youth unemployment is a disgrace REGARDLESS OF THE REASONS FOR IT.

        The societal cost will be immense if it is not addressed – it already is but it will get worse.

      • Man hands on misery to man.
        It deepens like a coastal shelf.
        Get out as early as you can,
        And don’t have any kids yourself

      • Youth unemployment is a disgrace REGARDLESS OF THE REASONS FOR IT.

        The reasons can’t be disregarded if they are to the only people with the power to fix the problems.

      • @mander

        ….. So your argument is as follows: “-I have none”

        It would appear the key to economic survival is to ignore the very reason a crisis might occur, whilst one side steps the issue, and directs his attention and effort towards a battle of words.

        Oh my, this seems to rather ring some bells. Per-chance, could a certain group of individuals supposedly running a country be doing this?

        You have hypocritically generalized our arguments as homespun slander, yet not offered any logical import, nor a solution, even going as far to accent it’s lack of requirement.

        This… is why we cannot have good things…

    • Isn’t the point that the government gives them a chance when other employers won’t, turning unemployable greenhorns into useful contributors, such as UE seems to be saying happened to him at Treasury? Employability is learned.

      • Ah Stat, should employ-ability be learnt, the numbers show the Govt is doing less and less of it. So who is going to undertake that.
        MSM news around today says the small business sector of the economy is expecting record tough times, especially here in QLD where we now have a number of greenhorns running the state economy. What do you think is going to happen,
        The LNP says we are headed for a nose dive,I agree.WW

      • Well, no one.

        We don’t need employable youngsters, we have 457s, at least for as long as our terms of trade hold up, and we can outbid other English speaking nations for quality English speaking candidates.

    • Good call WW.

      The youth of the day need to stop playing their pacman video games and hit the bricks like I did back in 1976.

      Slap dash electronic resumes just don’t hold a candle to giving the manager a firm hand shake and direct eye contact.

      • Funny, since I remember one HR manager telling me that “any resumes I receive in paper I bin instantly”. Okay so, what businesses are we talking about? Small businesses where you’re going to have access to the manager? In that case, sure, although tell me how that’s going to work in say, public service, or large corporations.

      • @Hixtar

        Of course they walked 50km barefoot through the snow. They didn’t have this fancy global warming back in the day.

      • Funny, since I remember one HR manager telling me that “any resumes I receive in paper I bin instantly”.

        The real irony here is that they probably print out the ones they do receive electronically…

    • “Is it that the youth have made themselves unemployable, or the employers dont want young employees.?”

      neither WW… you’re missing the third and most likely cause for the stats:

      Could it be that the Boomer institute that run the country (and effectively control the public sector) are shaping policy that make it unfairly attractive to hire over-50’s in place of Australia’s youth? think the $10,000 hand-out to companies hiring over-50’s announced by our d#%*head gov’t around last year’s budget as an example of this. many many more sly incentives I am sure exist that are not widely publicised…

      anyone able to share any more examples of Boomers scratching their own backs at the expense of our youth?

      this is the sell-out of the century for Aussie youth

      • I don’t think it’s necessarily a picnic to get employed as an over-50, unless you know someone or are a super-expert in that field.

        The single biggest contributing factors has to be the high immigration rate and longer careers. Australia has a very high standard of living which attracts a high immigration rate and high quality of life meaning longer working lives.

      • No reason to think a single additional person over 50 has been hired by the APS. Based on numbers, very high probability they were existing staff who got older.

      • Bendy, you are probably correct, plus what Jason adds about immigration.
        Whoever endorsed these immigration polices has much to answer.

        Jason, I set up my own companies longer ago than you have been in work, unless you get off your arse and head off over seas you will never be able to retire.
        and Hixtar, my first job was in a sawmill at Rocklea and I used to walk from Mt Gravatt. About 10 miles,,,,each way. WW

      • Old Geezer Baby Boomers + Government Worker = Very Slow Service

        All those geriatrics shuffling around in their Zimmer frames, while running off to the toilet every 5 minutes to deal with their leaky bladders, not to mention constantly searching for that file “that they just put down” is going to do nothing for the efficiency and productivity of Australia’s public service.

        See WW, very easy to make generalisations.

      • It isn’t that they’re hiring more over 50’s insomuch as the workforce itself isn’t being replenished by younger stock.

      • agreed — Ridiculous immigration levels have a large effect of displacing Aussie youth from jobs…. and forcing them to compete for support services and the like.

        but if immigration levels were to be cut dramatically can you imagine how low the auction clearance rates would go! heaven FORBID

    • I don’t know – my nephew is 18, training to be an AFL umpire which means three sessions a week, which is great because that helps him with going to the Olympics in *** meters (state champ- wont mention the distance as you would be able to identify him), and also helps with his sports science studies as it returns him a 6 figure salary – something he has been doing since he was 15 often umpiring 4-6 games a week as an amateur.

      But yea, you know, state champ going to Olympics, trains, works and studies to fund himself ENTIRELY.

      Almost all of his mates are similar.

      Ironically todays youth are also the most entrepreneurial in all of history thanks to their incredible uptake of IT as internet natives- which makes them more employable than any other generation.

      A proliferation of alternative industries driving small business amongst youth to the highest ever as a percentage.

      But yeah – boomers with more privilege than any other generation in all of history CLEARLY work harder.

      Just the worst comment I have seen on this forum.

      • Yup. Even the young ones who don’t want to take the bait and get into mindless generational slanging matches are starting to suspect that there’s something a little bit wrong with the massively self-entitled boomer cohort.

        As for the boomers who are blaming today’s youth for the massive levels of youth unemployment, you really should know better. Why is it that the youth, who shouldn’t know better, are better behaved in this respect than those who should?

        As for the absurd ‘rocks were heavier in my day’ crowd, aside from the poor bastards who went to Vietnam or WWII, things were demonstrably MUCH easier from the 50’s all the way through to now. Anyone who attempts to argue that point is clueless, and I look forward to utterly demolishing their argument with a few simple stats.

        The way boomers are going as a cohort, they will provoke a massive anti-oldie response, which will sooner or later result in their pensions being smashed.

        I would not want to be a boomer with little savings right now.

      • “things were demonstrably MUCH easier from the 50’s all the way through to now”

        should read:

        “things were demonstrably MUCH easier from the 50’s all the way through to 2007”

    • Just my 2 cents, but I feel in suburbia no youngster is aiming for a goverment job and a lifetime of renting. They are either aiming for high paying plumbing jobs or if stupid nothing at all.

      Im sure the oldies working for the government love drinking their caters blend coffee whilst discussing their latest IP investment bought with equity mate.

      Lazy kids!

    • how does a generation “make itself unemployable” ?

      You mean that the education system has failed it ? or that some great environmental disaster has affected a whole generation ?

      They were born into the world we created.

      • Mate, in general the boomers think the boomers can do no wrong, and also think they did the hard yards when they were young and that kids these days are just lazy.

        There are some that don’t, but a hell of a lot that do, and the ones that do are by far the noisiest. A clear demonstration that the adage that wisdom comes with age is quite simply wrong.

        A mate of mine said to me about 6 years ago:
        “I’m planning to leave the country in a few years. The boomers in general believe that they’re entitled to all the wealth, and because of their numbers they will steal it”.

        Young people of Australia: leave! Australians have demonstrated over and over that they don’t give a damn about the country’s youth. Opportunities are much better overseas, you’ll get better experience, the option to return is always there if you wish it, and you get to deny tax revenue to the Australian government and associated parasites. Let them eat each other.

  2. A lack of career opportunities (unless you want to be a professional public servant), excessive and needless middle management, ridiculous micromanagement of staff, uncompetitive salaries and a technology handicap of 8-10 years behind the private sector are just the tip of the iceberg I witnessed having worked in the APS as a late twenty-something. The best decision I ever made in my life was handing in my resignation.

    The APS is a great place to work if you embrace a culture that masks incompetence (and in some cases promotes it) with extreme bureaucracy and office politics.

      • A fair and valid point. I wouldn’t be where I am now without the experience that I gained there either.

        Having said that, what I wrote previously isn’t inaccurate.

      • There is a lack of APS 1 and 2 positions mostly because the “mail boy” type role has mostly disappeared and the other simply jobs outsourced (Gardeners, cleaners etc). There used to be cadetships but now you need a degree if not something higher just to write letters.

        Plus the HR BS is horrendous, worse than much of the private sector. As a result previous exposure to that type of nonsense is a real advantage and that only comes with a previous job.

      • Acme, rude imbeciles like you are what’s wrong with the world. Since you apparently don’t value MB, I suggest you leave (or that UE bans you; either suits me).

      • Given the 2.5% under 25 stat, would you agree UE that the education requirements for entering the APS have grown to a point now that you need a Masters plus level attainment to get a look in for a role these days?

    • Interesting – perhaps you could find some more ridiculous cliches to throw around.

      Sorry you got fired.

      By the way – you clearly haven’t worked in major corporation which now days have far more waste, needless middle management, lower salaries, technology 8-10 years behind the public sector (ANZ bank has only JUST moved off FORTRAN), and by far the worst micromanagement in any sector.

      But yeah – ludicrous generalisations and urban myths are great.

      • Yes ludicrous generalisations witnessed first hand and experienced day to day.

        Fired? Nope incorrect on that one as well. I resigned after several years in the APS witnessing sycophants jawbone their way into executive level positions. I didn’t opt for a VR prior to my departure either.

        I never claimed the private sector was free from any of my previous criticisms. Clearly your reading comprehension and grammar needs work.

        Not that it’s any of your business but I have worked in a variety of sectors (including federal, state and even a multinational company that operates in 92 countries) and the fundamental difference between the private and public sector is if you don’t perform you’re out the door. That’s hard to do with lifer public servants. If you worked in the PS you’d know that right?

        Despite my view on the APS there are intelligent and hard working people working there including in the department I used to work in.

      • You see what you do for 130k in the NBN.
        Laughable.

        [There goes any chance I ever had of getting a job there, but half a dozen apps, teleworking, ain’t ever going to happen.

        (And I know some ex colleagues in the NBN see my comments. You all work hard, but you know what I am talking about!)]

  3. I thought they just weren’t hiring?

    Growth in 60 plus, anemic as it is, I guess could just be existing staff getting older so it kind of fits.

      • It’s not dead wood, its defined benefits super. The cohort in their 50’s mostly still has it (depending where). I was going to a meeting at a NSW govt dept where I heard a worker who was 57 bemoaning his job but saying he couldn’t leave as he was hanging on for his DB.

        Those people with DB super arrangements simply will not leave until it has been actuarially maxed out. And as an aside, they usually cop a few pay rises in the last years just for a bit of cherry on top.

      • Actually, for Commonwealth public servants, the time to go is at age 54 years and 11 months. So that cohort should be decreasing if they have the old pension scheme.

    • The hiring freeze is definitely part of it.

      I also know plenty of baby boomer career public servants who are hanging around to both maximise the payout on their generous PS pensions, and also in the hope of being given enormous redudancies.

      • + 1, Just replied same to Leith.

        It is like no one actually retires from the PS anymore. Everyone wants to cop a redundancy!

      • My experience working for a manufacturer on the brink of zombie status was that older workers with plans to retire shelved those plans whenever things started looking grimmer than usual, reasonably expecting a chance to win big with redundancy lotto. Easy to imagine the same thing happening in the APS.

        Dicey game, though – not unusual for the outcome to be died on the job, or, at least, forced out by chronic illness. 100% of your retirement in a hospital bed seems a steep price to pay for a 50% chance of a windfall you won’t be around to enjoy.

      • My aunty was recently made redundant after 40+ years at the ABC – and laughing all the way to the bank!

    • Hiring freeze? I thought a hiring freeze meant no new employees.

      In the year ended 30 June 2014 the Comm Govt permanently appointed 4672 new employees.
      2141 (45%) were between 18-29 y.o.

      Not to mention the thousands of temporary employees that have been appointed in the same period.

      What hiring freeze?

  4. A lot of work miserable old people bored with their jobs hanging on for their super after an easy, oh so easy life on the public teat.

    Entertaining each other in the tea room with much idle chatter about cooking show competitions and Ceasarstone benchtops and best mileage SUVs and ….oh the public. OMG STRESS!!!

    Slowly shuffling off this mortal coil but not before one more investment property and a luxury cruise or five. Such is life. Ho hum.

    There should be a use by date on career PS.

    • There are two domains in the public sector, my friend. The biggest one, by far, is the front line operator- teachers, nurses, cops, social workers, ambos, front counter jockeys and myriad other front liners.

      Then there are the shiny pants backroomers in policy, PR, accounting, IT. In the private sector, you are in the second shiny pants category.

      How ironic for a backseat bum like you to cast a reflection on public sector front-liners at Commonwealth, State, Local Government and statutory authority levels

      • Revisit the article. It’s referring to the APS specifically (i.e. no frontline staff other than telephony operators) and his reflection albeit a sweeping generalisation is pretty much on the mark.

        Have a cheeseburger and a valium.

      • I don’t think too many in the professions you note are in the cohort discussed above. Except teachers, who have it especially cruisy.

    • Yeah, become a banker and get $100mill for organising finance for a tunnel. Now that’s the hard working private sector for you.

      I worked both sides of the fence, and there are hard working folks and lazy bums in both sectors.

  5. Don’t worry about it. Tony has just learned and fallen in love with the phrase “intergenerational equity”. I am sure a world of opportunity and prosperity awaits the younger generation. Tony wouldn’t have it any other way.

    It is really tough for the younger generation. Broadly, they have neither time nor resources to obtain a broad, non-vocational education, to gather, discuss and get organised. We layabouts had free education and the Caf.

    Who says we don’t need another Whitlam, this time hopefully with a numerate Treasurer. I maintain that the books can be balanced at the same time as preserving the treasures of health, education and civil society. Just give me a go at the Expenditure Review Committee.

  6. The closure of the old Super Scheme with the anomaly that meant many left at just before 55 means that there is a much stronger incentive to hang on until 60 or 65 which is why the 55-65 demographic can be expected to grow.

    As they don’t leave, there is less opportunity to employ younger people. The trend might reverse and go back to near normal once the 55-65 demographic has gained its fair share of employment (given the incentive to be gone at 55 is gone).

    Permanent teachers under 25 are also increasingly rare but for the reason that maternity leave means the slightly older women are not resigning when they have their first child, but are returrning for a year or two then taking more maternity leave for their second child. That means many young teachers can’t get a permanent role and instead spend a few years doing maternity leave replacement roles. The same thing probably impacts other sectors too.

    Dough Short at Advisor Perspectives does updates which show the same issue in the US workforce. The seniors have increased their representation and the youth have had theirs reduced:
    http://www.advisorperspectives.com/dshort/commentaries/Stuctural-Changes-in-Employment.php

  7. Even if you make it in you’ll be facing a complete lack of career pathways due to

    a) policies mandating “merit-based” application procedures, which seem to rule out internal promotions, at least without going through the whole circus of job applications.

    b) an unmoveable top layer of babyboomers clinging madly on to their job and keeping others well at bay.

    (Although you can’t really blame the poor buggers, wouldn’t want to face retirement either with everything depending on IPs…)

  8. Mmmmm, UE you may be missing something here. yes the PS is top heavy with the aged, however they must retire eventually, leaving a big gap to fill in the PS.

    • That’s probably the next government’s problem.

      Of course, today’s young people who didn’t work for 80% of their twenties while the hiring freeze was going on will be totally unemployable by then, and tomorrow’s young people won’t have anyone to learn from, the boomers having retired.

      Get ready for a big influx of bureaucrats on 457s.

      • Problem is, all Western nations will be competing for those 457 bureaucrats. Germany is short 8 million workers by 2030.

      • Totally agree.

        But that’s tomorrow’s problem, amiright? Maybe we’ll have dug up the next China by then, and Iron ore will $200/ tonne.

      • Perhaps, but we do know where our health and pensions expenses will be at. 67,000 new pensioners over the last 12 months and over 50% get the full pension. Like this now for the next 15 years or so…

      • We are within a generation, two at the most, of 50%+ of jobs being done better/faster/cheaper by robots and AI.

        Why do you think all those retiring workers will need to be replaced ?

      • Jobs are being replaced now by automatication and have been for some time. bank tellers, checkout chicks and the list goes on…

      • @drsmithy,

        I suppose my answer is that automation requires an upfront investment, and our government tries to avoid that sort of spending, automation of the APS will only happen in earnest once a labour shortage exists.

      • @drmsithy,

        Also, the timeframe you give is that automation required is available within 20-30 years (what I infer from one or two generations used in your comment) but the shortfall arises in about fifteen years, when all boomers are over 65 y.o.

      • Jobs are being replaced now by automatication and have been for some time. bank tellers, checkout chicks and the list goes on…

        Yes ?

      • I suppose my answer is that automation requires an upfront investment, and our government tries to avoid that sort of spending, automation of the APS will only happen in earnest once a labour shortage exists.

        On current trends, most of the APS (from a functionality perspective) will probably have been outsourced by then, and the outsourcers will be automating.

        Also, the timeframe you give is that automation required is available within 20-30 years (what I infer from one or two generations used in your comment) but the shortfall arises in about fifteen years, when all boomers are over 65 y.o.

        There’s a builtin assumption there that all the jobs even need to be replaced/automated. I’m sure the bullshit job is as prevalent in the public service as it is in private industry.

        Boomers aren’t going to be all retiring at 65, either. Most of them are not sitting on real estate goldmines and will need to work well past 65 to survive the rest of the lengthening lifespans.

        In short, the idea that the boomer retire-/die-off will produce a massive employment opening (or drop in productivity) is ridiculous in the context of rapidly improving automation technologies.

  9. My 2cents. I’m a teacher and at my school, a public high school in Sydney, there are 5 teachers that I personally know who have retired at 55 on a generous super scheme one could only describe as obscene.They receive 80 percent of their retirement wage for the rest of their lives.. We’re talking about 75 k a year, and the ones retiring on head teacher wages are looking at 85 k a year and the deputy principals 100k. If this is not bad enough, after the school holidays, they are re-employed on 300 dollars a day casual wages so around 1500 a week on top of super. This denies young teachers an opportunity to skill up and hone their craft. Many young teachers leave to work overseas or leave teaching altogether. Its like living in Greece. The entitlements of the boomer cohort is grossly unfair and discriminatory. How can anyone justify paying a boomer to babysit kids (casual teaching) upwards of 160 000 k a year.

      • tmarsh
        It is if you want to tax them.
        The tax free threshold for wage earners would be $70,000 if GST was 20%.

      • GST at any % won’t change the problem of dead wood on $160k, who don’t want to be there hanging around stopping 3 graduate teachers getting a job.

        Very hard to get a graduate job in teaching at the moment – it’s like trying to break into iron ore mining for the first time right now, but it’s a bigger problem if a future shortfall develops.

    • 54 eleven is a total rort. I guess the idea was to encourage some overpaid oldies to leave, but without proper limits it’s blown up in their faces.

    • Its like living in Greece. The entitlements of the boomer cohort is grossly unfair and discriminatory. How can anyone justify paying a boomer to babysit kids (casual teaching) upwards of 160 000 k a year.

      You are wrong. Greece at least had the PS pension tied to the budget. So if the pollies+PS bust the budget, their entitlements will get cut when the IMF holds a gun at their head.

      Here, the F%@#wit Costello made a smart move. He took the money out of the budget and called it the “Future Fund” while in reality, it is just a slush fund for pollies and older PS pension.

      Very Orwellian and very greedy.. [email protected]

      • You are wrong. Greece at least had the PS pension tied to the budget. So if the pollies+PS bust the budget, their entitlements will get cut when the IMF holds a gun at their head.

        Minimum wage should be tied to politician pay in the same fashion, so they can’t raise their own wages without raising everyone else’s.

  10. Mind you, they are often re-employed in their old positions but on a casual basis. We call it a “block” of teaching.

    Its disgusting, and when you point it out to them they look at you blankly in shock I can only assume, and then comes the usual retort along the lines of ” I cant believe the hide of you to question my entitlements. I have worked hard for this and besides, it’s none of your business”

    I don’t think anyone has ever raised with them the idea that they perhaps are milking the system. They really don’t like the reflection in the mirror you point at them. A little consciousness raising is really important in life. At least for me its fun to watch them get very uncomfortable in a staffroom with other teachers who will never enjoy the same benefits and others who cant find permanent work or are facing the prospect of leaving the profession or moving OS.

    • If you ever get a chance to capture their expressions on film, I know a lot of new teachers who would enjoy seeing same.

  11. Simple answer.

    Not. Enough, Jobs.

    And it’s not just the youth.

    How;s the ICC bringing in cheap labour from OS, denying broadcast freelancers work during the world cup

  12. Frederic Bastiat

    As a 32 year old, former public servant that left my APS job and Canberra last year, I can say with some confidence that what is occuring within the APS is a disgrace.

    A baby boomer manafactured destruction of young public servants. Aimed purely at maintaing their position in the pecking order and bolstering their superannuation before they spend 30 years claiming generous entitledments and going on cruises in Europe.

    Meanwhile, young people are stuck with house price-income multiples of 8+, massive HECS debts, growing tax burden, insane childcare costs and a bunch of grey haired MPs and Bueracrats making the rules.

    The only solution is for a youth movement to form..and I am not talking about those tree-hugging hypocrites at Get Up. I am talking about a broad-based political alliance of under 35 year olds that with resist the intergenerational theft that is currently taking place.

    • You should take some comfort in the fact that most of them will either have Alzheimer’s or a spouse with Alzheimer’s requiring substantial care well before they have clocked up 30 years of cruises in Europe.

    • Fred, that is what is needed. The pot needs to be stirred, initially then well agitated.
      The situation for the young is not going to self correct, it needs to be forced.

      2 things will occur, the Status Quo will realise there is an issue, and the young will understand what is needed to take the nation forward.
      It needs to start whilst this current govt is dysfunctional. Get on to it.WW

      WW